Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Am trying to hash my string and came up with the following code:

import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException;
import java.nio.charset.Charset;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.MessageDigest;
import sun.misc.BASE64Encoder;

public class JavaTest {
    public static void main (String[] args) throws UnsupportedEncodingException, NoSuchAlgorithmException {
        String rawString = "9498131529";
        System.out.println(Charset.defaultCharset());
        System.out.println(rawString);

        MessageDigest digest = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
        digest.update(rawString.getBytes("UTF-8")); 
        BASE64Encoder encoder = new BASE64Encoder();
        byte hashedBytes[] = (new String(digest.digest(), "UTF-8")).getBytes();
        System.out.println(encoder.encode(hashedBytes));
    }
}

I was under the impression that this piece of code should be platform independent, since when I try to get the bytes from the String I am specifying the encoding type "UTF-8".

But when I ran the code on my Mac, Dev environment and staging environment I got the following result: Mac

MacRoman
9498131529
XElaLD8UPzE/P1sWDz8/Pw==

Dev:

US-ASCII
9498131529
XElaLD8UPzE/P1sWDz8/Pw==

Staging

UTF-8
9498131529
XElaLO+/vRTvv70x77+977+9WxYP77+977+977+9

My config:

Mac

> sw_vers
ProductName:    Mac OS X
ProductVersion: 10.9
BuildVersion:   13A603

Dev

> cat /proc/version
Linux version 2.6.21.7-2.fc8xen-ec2-v1.0  (gcc version 4.1.2 20070925 (Red Hat 4.1.2-33)) #2 SMP Tue Sep 1 10:04:29 EDT 2009

Staging

> cat /proc/version
Linux version 3.2.0-31-virtual (gcc version 4.6.3 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) ) #50-Ubuntu SMP Fri Sep 7 16:36:36 UTC 2012

What am I missing here? Why is the hashing algorithm system independent? And I believe MD5 should be platform independent according to the specification. Am I wrong about my assumption?

Please let me know if you need any more details!

share|improve this question
3  
The step where you round-trip the digest to and from a string (new String(digest.digest(), "UTF-8").getBytes()) looks suspicious. (And unnecessary - you should probably base-64 the digest itself.) The digest might not, in fact, be valid UTF-8, and what you're seeing might be different decode error handling. – millimoose Nov 20 '13 at 23:02
    
Actually, wait, that is probably exactly where things go wrong. .getBytes() without an argument encodes the string in the default charset, and MacRoman and US-ASCII might be similar enough to coincidentally give the same result. Using .getBytes("UTF-8") should get you identical behaviour everywhere, but it's still the wrong thing to do. – millimoose Nov 20 '13 at 23:09
    
@millimoose Thanks for your inputs! :) I guess Stefan beat you to the answer. – rohit kotian Nov 20 '13 at 23:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why the extra round trip through String? Even if you add "UTF-8" to getBytes() it would still be wrong because it would treat a raw byte array (the digest) as if it would be a UTF-8 encoded string.

Change the hashedBytes line to:

    byte hashedBytes[] = digest.digest();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Make sense. – rohit kotian Nov 20 '13 at 23:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.