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sub foos { qw/foo foo/ }
sub bars { qw/bar bar bar/ }

What is a good concise way to assert that "the number of items returned by foos() is less than the number of items returned by bars()"? foos() < bars() doesn't work, nor does scalar(foos()) < scalar(bars()).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"Concise" is up to you, I guess, but the simplest way is to assign the result to arrays and compare the arrays

my @a = foos();
my @b = bars();
print @a < @b;     # prints 1 with the above subs

You can also convert the counts by using the = () = method:

my $foo = () = foos();  # 2
my $bar = () = bars();  # 3
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The following works as written, but not with the OP's function definitions. Perhaps it has something to do with how qw// behavior changed a couple of releases back. Or, there might be an issue with the function being optimized to a constant.

sub foos {(1,2,3)}
sub bars {(1,2,3,4)}

if (foos() < bars()) 
 { print 'foos returns fewer elements than bars'}
else
 { print 'foos returns same or more elements than bars'}

The following works with the OP's function (or are they constant?) definitions.

sub foos { qw/foo foo/ }
sub bars { qw/bar bar bar/ }

if ( (@g=foos) < (@h=bars) ) 
 { print 'foos returns fewer elements than bars'}
else
 { print 'foos returns same or more elements than bars'}
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The first example "works" because bars() returns 1,2,3,4, and in scalar context, that list becomes the last element, which is 4. Which is larger than 3 from foos(). This is reported if you use warnings when using non-numerical elements in the subs (Argument "foo" isn't numeric in numeric lt (<)) –  TLP Nov 21 '13 at 10:44
    
Hah! Thanks for the clarification. (That'll teach me to test code w/o warnings enabled.) –  Tom Williams Nov 22 '13 at 2:34
    
Testing code without strict and warnings is quite pointless, indeed. And also, I did the same thing -- tried it with numbers -- which is why I knew about it. :) –  TLP Nov 22 '13 at 9:16

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