Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class test
{
private:
    class privateStruct
    {
    public:
        int m;
        privateStruct(int p){m=p;}
    };
};

void ff()
{
    test::privateStruct ps(4);
    throw ps; //Does not work.. 
}

void main()
{
    try
    {
        ff();
    }
    catch(...)
    {
    }
}

But the Following Code Works Why

class test
{
private:
    class privateStruct
    {
    public:
        int m;
        privateStruct(int p){m=p;}
    };
};

void ff()
{
    throw test::privateStruct(4); //Work why
}

void main()
{
    try
    {
        ff();
    }
    catch(...)
    {
    }
}

NOTE : I am using VC++ 6.

I need answer why the above code works.

Thanks in Advance :)

share|improve this question
1  
Using which compiler does the second example "work?" Both Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 and Intel C++ Compiler 11 for Windows fail to compile it because privateStruct is inaccessible. –  James McNellis Jan 6 '10 at 5:30
    
I'll add that gcc4.4 also won't compile either of those, for the same reason. –  Drew Dormann Jan 6 '10 at 5:32

3 Answers 3

This is an old/known bug with Visual Studio 6.0. It ignores access specifiers when constructing temporaries. No fix is available.

Raising the warning level to 3 or higher (/W3) will cause the offending code to give a warning.

share|improve this answer

The code in your second example works because Visual C++ 6 is notorious for its horrible standards compliance.

It works by accident.

share|improve this answer

Even the second code snippet won't compile. privateStruct cannot be accessed in the function ff().

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.