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I have python code like this:

newlist =[[52, None, None], [129, None, None], [56, None, None], [111, None, None],  
          [22, None, None], [33, None, None], [28, None, None], [52, None, None],  
          [52, None, None], [52, None, None], [129, None, None], [56, None, None],  
          [111, None, None], [22, None, None], [33, None, None], [28, None, None]]

I want the newlist like:

newlist =[52, None, None,129, None, None,56, None, None,111, None, None,22, 
          None, None,33, None, None,28, None, None,52, None, None,52, None,  
          None,52, None, None,129, None, None,56, None, None, 111, None,  
          None,22, None, None,33, None, None,28, None, None]

Is there any way to work around ?

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marked as duplicate by thefourtheye, aIKid, oefe, Lorenz Meyer, JKirchartz Mar 5 at 20:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

What you are trying to do is called flattening the list. And according to the Zen of Python, you are trying to do the right thing. Quoting from that

Flat is better than nested.

  1. So you can use list comprehension like this

    newlist = [item for items in newlist for item in items]
    
  2. Or you can use chain from itertools like this

    from itertools import chain
    newlist = list(chain(*newlist))
    
  3. Or you can use chain.from_iterable, where unpacking of the list is not necessary

    from itertools import chain
    newlist = list(chain.from_iterable(newlist))
    
  4. Using sum function

    newlist = sum(newlist, [])
    
  5. Using reduce function

    newlist = reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, newlist)
    
  6. Using operator.add. This will be faster than the reduce with lambda version.

    import operator
    newlist = reduce(operator.add, newlist)
    

Edit: For the sake of completeness, included the answers found in Making a flat list out of list of lists in Python as well.

I tried to time all of them in Python 2.7, like this

from timeit import timeit
print(timeit("[item for items in newlist for item in items]", "from __main__ import newlist"))
print(timeit("sum(newlist, [])", "from __main__ import newlist"))
print(timeit("reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, newlist)", "from __main__ import newlist"))
print(timeit("reduce(add, newlist)", "from __main__ import newlist; from operator import add"))
print(timeit("list(chain(*newlist))", "from __main__ import newlist; from itertools import chain"))
print(timeit("list(chain.from_iterable(newlist))", "from __main__ import newlist; from itertools import chain"))

Output on my machine

2.26074504852
2.45047688484
3.50180387497
2.56596302986
1.78825688362
1.61612296104

So, the most efficient way to do this is to use list(chain.from_iterable(newlist)), in Python 2.7. Ran the same test in Python 3.3

from timeit import timeit
print(timeit("[item for items in newlist for item in items]", "from __main__ import newlist"))
print(timeit("sum(newlist, [])", "from __main__ import newlist"))
print(timeit("reduce(lambda x,y: x+y, newlist)", "from __main__ import newlist; from functools import reduce"))
print(timeit("reduce(add, newlist)", "from __main__ import newlist; from operator import add; from functools import reduce"))
print(timeit("list(chain(*newlist))", "from __main__ import newlist; from itertools import chain"))
print(timeit("list(chain.from_iterable(newlist))", "from __main__ import newlist; from itertools import chain"))

Output on my machine

2.26074504852
2.45047688484
3.50180387497
2.56596302986
1.78825688362
1.61612296104

So, be it Python 2.7 or 3.3, use list(chain.from_iterable(newlist)) to flatten the nested lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Got a question. Why does this work [i for j in l for i in j] and this [i for i in j for j in l] doesn't? –  tMJ Nov 21 '13 at 4:59
    
@tMJ In the second form, the sublists are being comprehended again, not the individual elements in the sublists. Just break the comprehension and print the values of i in both the cases. –  thefourtheye Nov 21 '13 at 5:01
    
@tMJ: think about the equivalent for loops. The first is for j in l: for i in j: newlist.append(i), and the second is for i in j: for j in l: newlist.append(i). –  DSM Nov 21 '13 at 5:01
    
@DSM i thought it that way, equating it to a nested lopp structure, but the issue is that if the outer loop is for i in j: j is not initialized yet. So, what do I make of that. Even though the structure [i for i in j for j in l] would assign some value to j, IDK as to what it would be. –  tMJ Nov 21 '13 at 5:04
1  
@tMJ: In Python 2, list comprehensions leak the loop variables. Try the same thing again, but del j between the two, and you'll see NameError: name 'j' is not defined. –  DSM Nov 21 '13 at 5:11

Just the easiest one:

newlist = sum(newlist, [])
print newlist
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temp = []
for small_list in newlist:
    temp += small_list
newlist = temp

This should do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this quadratic? It may be better to use temp.extend(small_list). –  dstromberg Nov 21 '13 at 4:59
    
what do you mean by quadratic? –  tMJ Nov 21 '13 at 5:00
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/3653298/… It's slightly better to use += than .extend() –  tMJ Nov 21 '13 at 5:01
    
Quadratic means O(n^2) time. –  dstromberg Nov 21 '13 at 7:54
    
Nope. It's linear. –  tMJ Nov 22 '13 at 4:51

Try:

newlist = [j for i in newlist for j in i]
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