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Am new to Perl and trying to create a hash from a text file. I have a text file external to the code that is intended to be editable by other people. The assumption is that they should be familiar with Perl and would know where to edit. The text file essentially contains several hash of hashes, complete with proper syntax, indents, etc., just like a normal Perl code would be. Keys and values will differ, but all hash of hashes will have the same depth.

Question: How do I read this file into my code and be able to use these hashes?

In learning, I tried an 'open (FILE)' then a 'while', but throwing each line into an @rray does not preserve the hashes. Or do I have to use each line to create my several hash of hashes inside my code?

Thnx for any assistance.

Rod

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3 Answers 3

It's really easy:

 my $nested_hash = do "your_file.txt";

So if your_file.txt contains something like:

{
  a => 1,
  b => [1,2,3],
  c => {
    c1 => 42
    c3 => {
      c11 => 21
    }
  }
}

Then $nested_hash can be used like:

$nested_hash->{a}   # equals 1
$nested_hash->{b}   # the array reference [1,2,3]

$nested_hash->{c}->{c1} # equals 42

You could also have more than one data structure in your external text file; just define them as a list separated by ,.

In your_file.txt:

{
  a => 1,
  b => [1,2,3],
},
{
  c => 3,
  d => 4,
}

Then you read them from your script, you use a list context:

my @nested_hashes = do "your_file.txt";

So

$nested_hashes[0]->{a}  # gives you 1
$nested_hashes[1]->{c}  # gives you 3
share|improve this answer
    
Thnx, Faiz. My fault for not being clear enough due to my inexperience. I guess what am looking for is to copy the entire hash structure in that external file into my code and work on it as a hash. Today, there is only one hash of hashes. Tomorrow, there could be two or more as others added what they want into the file. The next day, there could be none. Rod –  Rod Nov 21 '13 at 5:46
    
I see. does my last edit help? –  Faiz Nov 21 '13 at 6:16
    
Thnx, Faiz. What you posted will definitely help me in the future, but for now, I still need to find some ways to quickly slurp the entire content of that file and see it as a list of hash of hashes. I may have no choice but to hard code a sub to work on individual lines to create an internal hash from an array. One hash will be something like: key -> sub-key -> values . The next week, someone may add in: key -> sub-key -> value value -> sub-key -> value The next day, someone else may add in his with 3 sub-keys with different values. And I would have to work on all of them. –  Rod Nov 21 '13 at 6:40
    
I'm sorry, but without a better understanding of your problem I'm unable to provide any concrete help beyond what I've posted. What have you tried so far? Do you have any bits of code, for example the subroutibe you'd rather not hard-code? –  Faiz Nov 21 '13 at 6:56
    
Thnx, Faiz. Your first example, the one with the 'c' keys, is closest if not identical to my problem. Basically, I would like to copy the hash structure itself, and not just reading the keys and values, and from my limited experience, the most I have done so far is to simply read the file and put everything into an array, that is easy enough, but that does not mean I have a hash or hashes of hashes, like your first 'c' example. It just simply mean I have an array where each line contains items from a text file. –  Rod Nov 21 '13 at 7:33

Using Data::Dumper.

First, create a data structure and save it to a file.

use Data::Dumper;

my $hash = {
    'k1' => 'v1',
    'k2' => 2,
};

open my $output, '>', 'data' or die $!;
print $output Dumper $hash;

The file data should look like this:

$VAR1 = {
          'k2' => 2,
          'k1' => 'v1'
        };

It's editable by humans.

Now , if you want to get back the data to your program (after human editing for instance):

my $hash = do 'data';
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So you have a file of hashes, let's call it bar.pm :

our $hash = {
      a => 1,
      b => [1,2,3],
    },
    {
      c => 3,
      d => 4,
    } ; 

our $hosh = {
      v => 1,
      w => [1,2,3],
    },
    {
      x => 3,
      y => 4,
    } ;

1;

Now the following code in another script :

use strict;
use warnings ;
use Data::Dumper ; 

require('bar.pm') ;
our $hash ; 
our $hosh ;
print Dumper $hash ; 
print Dumper $hosh ;

Does what you want, as the print Dumper shows

You still need to know which hashes where defined in the bar.pm files though, because you need to our them into you code. To avoid that you could define in bar.pm a master hash of hashes.

I would probably never do this myself, if only because :

"The assumption is that they should be familiar with Perl and would know where to edit"

Seems somewhat dangerous. There is a number of config modules on CPAN that would probably be much better.

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