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def a():
    w='www'
a.a='aaa'
print a.__dict__
a.__dict__={'1':'111','2':'222'}
print a.1#error
print a['1']#error

how can i get the value '111' thanks

share|improve this question
11  
Why are you doing this to yourself? – Alok Singhal Jan 6 '10 at 7:55
    
see django.utils.functional.py – zjm1126 Jan 6 '10 at 8:22
3  
please, don't do it. __dict__ is not what it seems and is not guaranteed to be defined for any object (for example, check this: docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#slots). Just use setattr. Please. Oh, and 1 is not a valid identifier in python. – shylent Jan 6 '10 at 9:17
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You'll have to do

print a.__dict__['1']

or

print getattr(a, '1')

"1" is not a valid variable name in Python. If you did:

a.__dict__ = {'a1' : '111'}
print a.a1

it would work.

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4  
I wouldn't recommend messing with __dict__ though. :) – Sapph Jan 6 '10 at 8:01

Since you say are just a beginner, perhaps you're just looking for the even easier:

 a = {'1':'111','2':'222'}

so a['1'] returns the desired '111'

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You can access it thanks to the __dict__ member. See following code

def a():
    w='www'
a.a='aaa'
print a.__dict__
a.__dict__={'1':'111','2':'222'}
print a.__dict__['1']
share|improve this answer

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