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I am a 3. party SDK, which is made up from .dll, .lib and .h files. I am using the .dll's to PInvoke against. And the .h files to see the function names and parameters. (So I am not using the .lib files).

The SDK is rather complex, so making the PInvoke wrappers have proven to be a challenge. All the functions/structs/enums is defined in the .h files.

The function I am trying to wrap is called InitBaseComponent, and I can call it, but it returns a "Error In Argument" enum back. So my guess is it is marshalling that creates this problem. So the question is: I am doing this right?

Function: InitBaseComponent(...)

//C Function: InitBaseComponent(...)
ERROR InitBaseComponent(
    Method_Interface* methodInterface, //[in]
    void* methodInst, //[in]
    ErrorCallBackFunction errorCallbackFunc, //[in]
    void* ErrorCallbackInst, //[in]
    Component* BaseComponent //[in, out]
);

//C# Function: InitBaseComponent(...)
[DllImport("externalSDK.dll", EntryPoint = "InitBaseComponent", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public static extern ERROR InitBaseComponent(
    Method_Interface methodInterface, 
    IntPtr methodInst, 
    ErrorCallBackFunction errorCallbackFunc, 
    IntPtr ErrorCallbackInst, 
    out Component BaseComponent 
);

Enum: ERROR

//C Enum: ERROR 
typedef enum ERROR_E {
    OK = 0, //Everything is ok
    E_ARG = 1, //Error in the Arguments 
    E_DATA = 2 //Data error
    //And more...
 } ERROR;

 //C# Enum: ERROR
 public enum ERROR
 {
    OK = 0, //Everything is ok
    E_ARG = 1, //Error in the Arguments 
    E_DATA = 2 //Data error
    //And more...
 }

Struct: Method_Interface

//C struct: Method_Interface
typedef struct Method_Interface_S 
{
    void* (*Method1)(void* Inst, size_t size);
    void* (*Method2)(void* Inst, size_t nelements, size_t bytes);
    void* (*Method3)(void* Inst, void *pointer, size_t size);
    void (*Method4)(void* Inst, void* pointer);
}Method_Interface;

//C# class: Method_Interface
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public class Method_Interface
{
    [UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
    public delegate void Method1_delegate(IntPtr Inst, uint size);

    [UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
    public delegate void Method2_delegate(IntPtr Inst, uint nelements, uint bytes);

    [UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
    public delegate void Method3_delegate(IntPtr Inst, IntPtr pointer, uint size);

    [UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
    public delegate void Method4_delegate(IntPtr Inst, IntPtr pointer);

    public Method1_delegate Method1;
    public Method2_delegate Method2;
    public Method3_delegate Method3;
    public Method4_delegate Method4;
}

Delegate: ErrorCallBackFunction

//C ErrorCallBackFunction
typedef void (*ErrorCallBackFunction)(void* errorCallBackInst, ERROR errorCode, const char* szMessage, const char* szDetail);

//C# delegate: ErrorCallBackFunction
[UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public delegate void ErrorCallBackFunction(IntPtr errorCallBackInst, ERROR errorCode, string szMessage, string szDetail);

Struct: Component

//C struct: Component
typedef struct Component_S
{
    void* ObjPointer;    
    unsigned long number; 
} Component;

//C# class: Component
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public class Component
{
    public IntPtr ObjPointer;
    public ulong number;
}

Anyone knows what I am doing wrong?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have declared Component in the C# as a class. That means that it is already a reference. But then you passed it as an out parameter which adds an extra layer of indirection, one too many. So, you need to remove the out, just as you did for methodInterface.

[DllImport(...)]
public static extern ERROR InitBaseComponent(
    Method_Interface methodInterface, 
    IntPtr methodInst, 
    ErrorCallBackFunction errorCallbackFunc, 
    IntPtr ErrorCallbackInst, 
    Component BaseComponent 
);

Obviously you need to instantiate the Component object in your C# before you call InitBaseComponent.

Some other observations:

  1. size_t is pointer sized, so your translation as uint will fail on 64 bit platforms.
  2. C# long is 64 bits, but C++ long is 32 bits, on Windows. So your translation of the C++ Component struct is wrong. The number field must be declared with type uint.
share|improve this answer
    
I have removed the "out". And I have tried to change all C size_t / C# uint to C size_t / C# IntPtr. And I have changed ulong number uint. Sadly it didn't help. –  Mr. Java Wolf Nov 21 '13 at 12:24
    
But if I have a IntPtr(another function call which is to set a void*), I can set it to "out" and it is getting a value all nicely. –  Mr. Java Wolf Nov 21 '13 at 12:28
    
Do you think I got something wrong? What exactly do you disagree with? I suspect that you don't understand what the out is doing. That has the effect of telling the marshaller to pass a pointer to BaseComponent. Remove the out and you instead pass BaseComponent. So your out is putting an extra, erroneous, layer of indirection. –  David Heffernan Nov 21 '13 at 12:30
    
I'm wondering, do you fully understand the implication of declaring your struct translations as class rather than struct? It's fine to declare them as class, but it makes them a reference type rather than a value type. And so when you pass an instance of a class, you are passing a reference to the object, and the p/invoke turns that into a pointer. Essentially this boils down to the fact that in C# an instance variable is really just a pointer to the object. –  David Heffernan Nov 21 '13 at 12:34
    
Another way to think of this is as follows. When you pass a class by out or ref that means that you are asking the native code to modify the reference. Well, it can't very well do that. Only the managed code can synthesise new instances of a class. The only scenario where out <someclasstype> instance or ref <someclasstype> instance would be viable would be if the native code was already holding a list of possible references to managed objects that it could pick from. Or perhaps if the native code could make a call back to the managed code to get one. –  David Heffernan Nov 21 '13 at 12:39

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