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Relative programming newbie here. I have trouble figuring out how to plot interpolated functions over a series of iterations, where as the iteration index increases, the plot would go from black to gradually lighter shades of grey.

For example,

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d

for t in np.arange(0.,2., 0.4):
    x = np.linspace(0.,4, 100)
    y = np.sin(x-2*t) + 0.01 * np.random.normal(size=x.shape)
    yint = interp1d(x, y)
    plt.plot(x, yint(x))

plt.show()

produces enter image description here

I would like the blue sinusoidal function to be black, and the rest becomes lighter and greyer as t increases (to the right). How would I do that?

Thank you all for your generous help!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See: http://matplotlib.org/api/axes_api.html#matplotlib.axes.Axes.plot

E.g. you can set plt.plot(x, yint(x), color=(0.5, 0.5, 0.5)) for a gray line. You can set the values up however you like (0.0 is black, 1.0 is white). A simple example:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d

for t in np.arange(0.,2., 0.4):
    x = np.linspace(0.,4, 100)
    y = np.sin(x-2*t) + 0.01 * np.random.normal(size=x.shape)
    yint = interp1d(x, y)
    print t
    col = (t/2.0, t/2.0, t/2.0)
    plt.plot(x, yint(x), color=col)

plt.show()

enter image description here

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That's fantastic! Thanks! One question, however: Looking through documentations and playing around with the code, I still can't figure out the line col = (t/2.0, t/2.0, t/2.0). Why does it contain 3 identical elements? What does each refer to (e.g., starting color, ending color, etc.)? It also appears that I can add more t/n inside the parenthesis indefinitely.. What's going on here? –  user1211129 Nov 21 '13 at 11:07
1  
An element like (2, 4, 5.0, "something") is a tuple. It can have an arbitrary number of elements. In this case we are setting an RGB tuple. The first number is the red intensity, the second the blue, the third the green. When these are equal you get gray. So we are creating a tuple representing a gray colour and then using that for the line color. You can see different options for how to do this in the link I gave if you scroll down to the paragraph beginning "by default". –  Mr E Nov 21 '13 at 11:27
1  
If things like tuples are unfamiliar to you, I recommend taking a little bit of time out to go through the Python Tutorial, the first five sections or so at least. –  Mr E Nov 21 '13 at 11:29
1  
The "RGB tuple" is a thing that the plot function recognises - in this context it will treat a tuple of numbers as instructions to set the color accordingly. It's not a feature of Python in general, in case my comment made it sound like it was. –  Mr E Nov 21 '13 at 11:35
1  
Thank you Mr E! Your answers are tremendously helpful. I will start on the Python Tutorial as recommended! –  user1211129 Nov 21 '13 at 11:39

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