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The data I have are ranges, where a score is assigned to all values within this range.

One entry of my data would look like this:

10000 177368 0.150849441498420722141

The first value indicating the start position, and the second the end position of this range. The last value the score of this range.

In the below code I plot the start- and end-positions of each range at their assigned score. Currently this connects each range with a line which is part of what I want to do, however I also want to fill the areas under each line.

I was also wondering how I can plot these positions in one go instead of having to loop through every entry in the list and then plotting each range individually.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

range_list = [(10000, 177368, 0.150849441498420722141),
          (227417, 267627, 0.148806758534977628949),
          (267628, 267633, 1),
          (267642, 267660, 1),
          (267661, 267670, 1),
          (317719, 471319, 0.125380779728419072816),
          (521368, 2634121, 0.292530330836878571521),
          (2634131, 2634171, 1),
          (2684220, 3845219, 0.332501576911355845034),
          (3995268, 13052949, 0.8),
          (13102998, 13219863, 0.304339098079899339488),
          (13319912, 13557063, 0.19949610114016369522),
          (13557092, 13557095, 1),
          (13607162, 17125609, 0.300713750216281716643),
          (17175658, 29878033, 0.306781992901534461549),
          (30028082, 103863857, 0.415235012665315250668),
          (203863857, 233863857, 0.415235012665315250668)]

plt.figure(figsize=(10, 5), facecolor='w')
plt.xlim([0, 250000000])
plt.ylim([0, 1])

for i in range(0, len(range_list)):
    plt.fill((range_list[i][0], range_list[i][1]),
            (range_list[i][2],range_list[i][2]), color='g')

plt.show()

enter image description here

UPDATE:

What I get if I follow the directions of Jakob which is exactly what I want.

enter image description here

UPDATE:

The methods below seem to work well with a small amount of ranges. However if I use a larger set of ranges (~100k) it will take too long. Is there another approach where it can be done more efficiently?

share|improve this question
2  
If you use fill_between instead of your fill the areas below will be filled –  Jakob Nov 21 '13 at 12:22
    
I've added a concept figure of what I want to do. –  Mvsm Nov 21 '13 at 12:23
    
@Jakob Well I guess that I need to read the documentation more in depth.. –  Mvsm Nov 21 '13 at 12:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's easiest to use bar for this specific example.

bar is a good fit because you want a constant y-value for all x-values within a given range. If we wanted a changing y-value, fill for fill_between would be a better fit.

For example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

range_list = [(10000, 177368, 0.150849441498420722141),
              (227417, 267627, 0.148806758534977628949),
              (267628, 267633, 1),
              (267642, 267660, 1),
              (267661, 267670, 1),
              (317719, 471319, 0.125380779728419072816),
              (521368, 2634121, 0.292530330836878571521),
              (2634131, 2634171, 1),
              (2684220, 3845219, 0.332501576911355845034),
              (3995268, 13052949, 0.8),
              (13102998, 13219863, 0.304339098079899339488),
              (13319912, 13557063, 0.19949610114016369522),
              (13557092, 13557095, 1),
              (13607162, 17125609, 0.300713750216281716643),
              (17175658, 29878033, 0.306781992901534461549),
              (30028082, 103863857, 0.415235012665315250668),
              (203863857, 233863857, 0.415235012665315250668)]

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
left, right, top = np.array(range_list).T

ax.bar(left, top, right - left, edgecolor='', facecolor='green')

plt.show()

enter image description here

Also, I'm currently plotting these with no edgecolor, so the very thin spikes in your data aren't showing up (similar to your example figure). However, it would (probably?) be better to show the "spikes" more obviously. If you want to do that, change the edgecolor to something other than an empty string (e.g. edgecolor='darkgreen'), or leave the kwarg out, and the default black edges will be shown.

share|improve this answer

Here's one quick way. My method of getting xs and ys is a bit inelegant but basically I set it up so that xs contains [range_list[0][0], range_list[0][1], range_list[1][0]...] and ys contains [range_list[0][2], range_list[0][2], range_list[1][2], range_list[1][2], ...]

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

range_list = [(10000, 177368, 0.150849441498420722141),
          (227417, 267627, 0.148806758534977628949),
          (267628, 267633, 1),
          (267642, 267660, 1),
          (267661, 267670, 1),
          (317719, 471319, 0.125380779728419072816),
          (521368, 2634121, 0.292530330836878571521),
          (2634131, 2634171, 1),
          (2684220, 3845219, 0.332501576911355845034),
          (3995268, 13052949, 0.8),
          (13102998, 13219863, 0.304339098079899339488),
          (13319912, 13557063, 0.19949610114016369522),
          (13557092, 13557095, 1),
          (13607162, 17125609, 0.300713750216281716643),
          (17175658, 29878033, 0.306781992901534461549),
          (30028082, 103863857, 0.415235012665315250668)]

xs = sorted([x[0] for x in range_list] + [x[1] for x in range_list])
ys = np.repeat([x[2] for x in range_list], 2)

plt.figure(figsize=(10, 5), facecolor='w')
plt.xlim([0, 250000000])
plt.ylim([0, 1])

plt.fill_between(xs, ys, y2=0.0)

plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This is not completely what I want, I don't want to connect different ranges. If there are gaps between ranges they should remain visible. –  Mvsm Nov 21 '13 at 12:12

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