Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A friend of mine ask me to make a program, to find which of the two user input numbers, was the greatest, as well as the sum of the numbers. I have all of the code, however, I am pretty sure the formatting of it is not correct. Please forgive me if I've done something stupid, as I am not too experienced with C++. Below is my code.

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
using namespace std;

int a, b;
int stats();
int sum();
int fin();

/*This handles user input for a and b*/
int main()
{
cout<<"Enter value one: "<<endl;
cin>>a;
cout<<"Enter value two: "<<endl;
cin>>b;
stats();
sum();
fin();
}
/*This finds out which  number is greater or less than*/
int stats()
{
if (a>b)
cout<< a << " Is greater than " << b <<endl;
else if (a<b)
cout<< a << " Is less than " << b <<endl;
else
cout<< a << " Is equal to " << b <<endl <<endl;
}

/*This finds the sum of a and b*/
int sum()
{
cout<<"The sum of a and b is " << a + b <<endl<<endl;
}

/*This should print which number is greater or
less than, and the sum of the numbers*/
int fin()
{
cout<<stats<<endl;
cout<<sum<<endl;
system ("pause");
return(0);
}

When I compile the code, and run it I can enter values for both a and b, however, after that, the program ends. If anyone can tell my why this is, or offer a fix, then I would really appreciate it. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask.

share|improve this question
    
Also, return something from main, like 0 in case of success. –  arne Nov 21 '13 at 13:18
1  
Function don't run automatically just because you write them (the only exception is main). Every other function must be called for it to execute. –  john Nov 21 '13 at 13:22
1  
@arne: That's optional. Running off the end of main will return zero. –  Mike Seymour Nov 21 '13 at 13:25
    
Good to have a friendly relationship with teachers ;) –  hauron Nov 21 '13 at 13:28
    
@MikeSeymour: While that's true, gcc will emit a warning if you use the proper flags -- and that's for a reason. –  arne Nov 21 '13 at 15:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think it's clear that what you intended in main is this

int main()
{
    cout<<"Enter value one: "<<endl;
    cin>>a;
    cout<<"Enter value two: "<<endl;
    cin>>b;
    stats(); // call the stats function
    sum();   // call the sun function
    fin();   // call the fin function
}

The last three lines of main are where you call the other functions you have written, this doesn't happen automatically.

Now the above will not compile because you must declare the three functions before you use them. So add these three lines before main;

    // declare the three functions
    int stats();
    int sum();
    int fin();

For every function you write you have these three aspects, declare it, define it (i.e. write it), and call it (i.e. use it). The syntax for each is different and you have to learn all three. This is about as basic as it gets for C++, so I'm quite worried where you are learning about C++ from. You really should be reading a good textbook.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback. I am not using a textbook, I'm just using what I've been able to find on the internet. Now I believe I've called these functions in int main() however, the code still isn't working. –  John Smith Nov 21 '13 at 15:26
    
@JohnSmith Well you will have to go into some detail about what 'isn't working' means. Perhaps you could edit the above question with your latest code. –  john Nov 21 '13 at 15:45
    
Don't worry, I just miss understood what you were saying before, I've sorted it out now. I forgot to call the functions in int main(). Thank you for your help. –  John Smith Nov 21 '13 at 16:06
    
Okay, the program is working fine, however, I am wondering why, it is returning two 1s after giving me int stats and int sum. It goes like this: Enter value one: 100 Enter value two: 200 100 is less than 200 The sum of a and b is 300 1 1 Press any key to continue... –  John Smith Nov 21 '13 at 16:33
    
The extra 1s are from these lines in fin, cout<<stats<<endl; cout<<sum<<endl<<endl;. Delete those and the problem will go away. Why those lines print 1 is complicated, and would take far too long to explain I'm afraid. –  john Nov 21 '13 at 16:37

You are not calling stats() or sum() from within main()

share|improve this answer

First of all, you're not invoking the methods from the main, second of all i recomend you to make the methods stats() or sum() in order to receive two parameters (the two inputs from the user) than declare two int global variables. Something like this:

int stats(int a, int b)
{

}

int sum(int a, int b)
{

}
share|improve this answer
    
a and b are global, not static. –  Anubhav Saini Nov 21 '13 at 13:39
    
i mean global not static! my mistake! –  jandresrodriguez Nov 21 '13 at 14:21

In your main() function, all you are doing is reading the user input, and then nothing else. Don't forget to call the other functions..

share|improve this answer

Hi there: in your code there are a few problems (nothing major so don't worry): to keep it short I have changed the code and added some comments(my previous answer was going to be twice as long doing it in plain text english):

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>

using namespace std;

//  Re-ordered the functions so that no forward declaration is not needed, 
//  and to make it compliant with more compilers.

/*
    Removed the return types from the functions:
    You only need a return type if the function is actually returning a value.
    As the functions were there was no return value necessary as the calculation
    and output were all handled internally to the function

    Also removed the global variables a and b and scoped them to main
    making them passed into functions as parameters.
*/

/*This finds out which  number is greater or less than*/
void stats(int a, int b)
{
    /*
        changed the 3 if statements to one with multiple branches:
        as there are only 3 possible outcomes this seemed more elegant and readable
        Normally put your most common clause at the top-most check if you want that
        evaluation to be the fastest during runtime.
    */
    if (a>b)
        cout<< a << " Is greater than " << b <<endl;
    else if (a<b)
        cout<< a << " Is less than " << b <<endl;
    else
        cout<< a << " Is equal to " << b <<endl <<endl;
}

/*This finds the sum of a and b*/
void sum(int a, int b)
{
    //  Added a bit more voluminous output to make the output easier to track and debug
    //  Also removed the extra variable, as you can do the calculation inline to save 
    //  RAM and processor instructions
    //  Negligible benefits for this program, but becomes more important as your code evolves
    cout<<"The sum of the values = "<< (a+b) <<endl;
}

/*This should print which number is greater or
less than, and the sum of the numbers*/
void fin(int a, int b)
{
    /*
        in here you only need to call the functions, if you do a cout on a function 
        what you will get is effectively garbage (has more meaning but that's for
        later learning:)
    */
    stats(a, b);
    sum(a, b);
}
/*This handles user input for a and b*/
int main()
{
    int a,b = 0;
    cout<<"Enter value one: "<<endl;
    cin>>a;
    cout<<"Enter value two: "<<endl;
    cin>>b;
    fin(a, b);
    //  have added the system pause here so that it happens whether you call fin() or not
    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}

Let me know if I have left anything out, and I will amend the answer to suit. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, thanks for that, it works perfectly, and I'll defiantly take into consideration what you've said, when programming in future. Now could I for instance, remove the void fin(a, b); function all together and replace it in int main() with stats(a, b); and sum(a, b);. Would this type of removal of functions add to the program's elegance, and overall efficiency? –  John Smith Nov 21 '13 at 15:29
    
That's a good point: mainly depends on what optimisations you have enabled in you compiler. For example unoptimised it could simply mean another function call in the code, once optimised however it would probably be removed as extraneous, effectively its just a partial deferment of main to another function. Sometimes you may want to encapsulate functions within another function however, to simply make it more readable, or perhaps to act as a placeholder for a function that will later contain more functonality. –  GMasucci Nov 21 '13 at 15:37
1  
Okay, interesting stuff, it'll be fun playing around with these ideas in future programming projects. Once again, thanks for the help. –  John Smith Nov 21 '13 at 15:50
    
You are welcome:) glad I could help –  GMasucci Nov 21 '13 at 15:57
    
cool, you can accept me as the answer if this works for you :) –  GMasucci Nov 21 '13 at 16:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.