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Let :

void foo( void )
{
    throw std::exception( "" );
}

void bar( void )
{
    try
    {
        foo():
    }
    catch( ... )
    {
        throw;
    }
}

void baz( void )
{
    try
    {
        bar();
    }
    catch( ... )
    {
    }
}

What does baz() catch ? An std::exception or something else ?

Thanks for your help !

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It catches the same std::exception that was thrown by foo. (At least, it would, if it were possible to throw std::exception like that in the first place.) throw; with no operand rethrows the exception object that's currently being handled.

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Thanks for your help. –  Virus721 Nov 21 '13 at 13:58

Yes, baz catches std::exception in this case.

But be careful when throwing std::exception because it should be used as a base class of exceptions. C++ Standard (Paragraph 18.8.1) specifies that std::exception only has a default constructor and a copy constructor, so you cannot put message into it.

Consider using std::runtime_error instead.

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It was just for the example. Thanks for your answer. –  Virus721 Nov 21 '13 at 13:59
    
std::exception is completely portable across standards-conforming implementations. There is no restriction to use as a base class. –  Pete Becker Nov 21 '13 at 16:17
    
@PeteBecker, std::exception is completely portable, but you cannot throw it as it is abstract on most platforms (with the exception of MSVC). –  Ivan Grynko Nov 21 '13 at 16:24
    
No, according to the C++ standard, 18.8.1 [exception], std::exception is not an abstract class. You may well be right that some implementations get this wrong; I haven't looked. –  Pete Becker Nov 21 '13 at 16:30
    
@PeteBecker, yes you're right, it's not an abstract class. But anyway you cannot throw std::ecxeption( "message" ) because C++ Standard (Paragraph 18.8.1) specifies that std::exception only has a default constructor and a copy constructor. –  Ivan Grynko Nov 21 '13 at 16:51

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