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So I came to this beautiful problem that asks you to write a program that finds whether a negative infinity shortest path exists in a directed graph. (Also can be thought of as finding whether a "negative cycle" exists in the graph). Here's a link for the problem:

http://uva.onlinejudge.org/index.php?option=com_onlinejudge&Itemid=8&page=show_problem&problem=499

I successfully solved the problem by running Bellman Ford Algorithm twice by starting with any source in the graph. The second time I run the algorithm, I check if a node can be relaxed. If so, then there is definitely a negative cycle in the graph. Below is my C++ code:

    #include<iostream>
    #include<vector>
    #include<algorithm>

    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {

        int test;
        cin>>test;

        for(int T=0; T<test; T++)
        {

            int node, E;

            cin>>node>>E; 

            int **edge= new int *[E];
            for(int i=0; i<E; i++)
            {
                edge[i]= new int [3];
                cin>>edge[i][0]>>edge[i][1]>>edge[i][2];
            }


            int *d= new int [node];


    bool possible=false;



            for(int i=0; i<node;i++)
            {
                d[i]= 999999999;
            }

            d[node-1]=0;

            for(int i=0; i<node-1; i++)
            {

                for(int j=0; j<E; j++)
                {
                    if(d[edge[j][1]]>d[edge[j][0]]+edge[j][2])
                        d[edge[j][1]]=d[edge[j][0]]+edge[j][2];
                }
            }


            //time to judge!
            for(int i=0; i<node-1; i++)
            {

                for(int j=0; j<E; j++)
                {
                    if(d[edge[j][1]]>d[edge[j][0]]+edge[j][2])
                    {
                        possible=true;
                        break;
                    }


                } 

                      if(possible)
                       break;

            }


    if(possible)
    cout<<"possible"<<endl;
    else
    cout<<"not possible"<<endl;

        }
    }

A professor told me once that Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm cannot find such negative cycle, but he did not justify it. I actually doubt this claim.

My question is, can Dijktstra's single source shortest path algorithm detect that negative cycle?

Of course, I can try Dijkstra's and check whether it will work, but I was excited to share this idea with you.

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1  
what you mean by infinite? –  artur grzesiak Nov 21 '13 at 14:11
    
Sorry, I think the right term is "negative cycle". In a weighed graph, a negative cycle is a cycle whose sum of edge weights is negative. –  Traveling Salesman Nov 21 '13 at 15:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You misunderstood your professor: he must have said that Dijkstra's algorithm will not work if there is a negative cycle in the graph. Positive cycles are allowed.

The reason the algorithm will not work on graphs with negative cycles is that the shortest path in such graphs is undefined: once you get to a negative cycle, you can bring the cost of your "shortest path" as low as you wish by following the negative cycle multiple times.

Negative cycle

Consider the example above: you start at the vertex Start, and arrive at A with the cost of 1. Then you go to B with the total cost of -1, to C with the total of -4, and now you can go back to A with the total cost of zero. By extending the sequence Start-A-B-C-A-B-C-A-B-C-...-Finish you could reduce the cost of a path from Start to Finish to as small a negative number as you wish.

Note that the negative cycle restriction applies to all algorithms for finding shortest path in a graph. The restriction on Dijkstra's algorithm is even stronger: it prohibits all negative edges.

It is certainly possible to modify Dijkstra's algorithm to detect negative cycles, but there is no point in doing so, because you have a stronger restriction of having no negative edges.

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I agree. This is what he said. But can you justify why Dijkstra's algorithm will not work if there is a negative cycle in the graph? –  Traveling Salesman Nov 21 '13 at 14:14
    
I'll check it. Many Thanks. –  Traveling Salesman Nov 21 '13 at 14:16
    
@Traveling: once you mark a node as "visited" (or "out", as in this animation), you need to be sure that this really is the lowest possible cost of reaching that node. If there were negative cycles, then there would exist a cycle which would result in a smaller cost for an already processed node. –  Groo Nov 21 '13 at 14:20
    
Why does wikipedia says that Dijkstra's algorithm works with non-negative edges (not mentioning negative-cycles)? Do you mean you can convert a graph without negative cycles into one without negative edges at all? –  Andrei I Nov 21 '13 at 14:37
2  
@AndreiI I used draw.io to make an image. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 21 '13 at 15:37

No algorithm neither dijktra nor bellman ford nor floyd warshall work on graphs with negetive cycle but the latter two can detect one whereas dijktra cannot because dijktra is greedy whereas others use DP. Moreover dijktra doesnt work on negetive weights even without negetive cycle.

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