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I am trying to write a procedure that takes a a symbol and a list and inserts the symbol at every possible position inside the given list (thus generating a list of lists). I have coded the following definitions, which I must implement:

1

(define (insert-at pos elmt lst)
 (if (empty? lst) (list elmt)
 (if (= 1 pos)
  (cons elmt lst)
  (cons (first lst) 
        (insert-at (- pos 1) elmt (rest lst))))))

2

(define (generate-all-pos start end)
 (if (= start end)
  (list end)
  (cons start (generate-all-pos (+ start 1) end))))

1 takes a position in a list (number), a symbol and the list itself and inserts the symbol at the requested position. 2 takes a start and a target position (numbers) and creates a sorted list with numbers from start to target. So far I have got this:

(define (insert-everywhere sym los)
 (cond
  [(empty? los) (list sym)]
   [else (cons (insert-at (first (generate-all-pos (first los)
    (first (foldl cons empty los)))) sym los) (insert-everywhere sym (rest los)))
           ]
         )
       )

Which results in

> (insert-everywhere 'r '(1 2 3))
(list (list 'r 1 2 3) (list 2 'r 3) (list 3 'r) 'r)

so I actually managed to move the 'r' around. I'm kind of puzzled about preserving the preceding members of the list. Maybe I'm missing something very simple but I've stared and poked at the code for quite some time and this is the cleanest result I've had so far. Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
What's the expected output of (insert-everywhere 'r '(1 2 3)) ? –  Óscar López Nov 21 '13 at 16:02
    
(list (list 'r 1 2 3) (list 1 'r 2 3) (list 1 2 'r 3) (list 1 2 3 'r)) –  user2969733 Nov 21 '13 at 16:05
1  
@user2969733 That's another form that would produce that same output. The output that you want is ((r 1 2 3) (1 r 2 3) (1 2 r 3) (1 2 3 r)), no? –  Joshua Taylor Nov 21 '13 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The insert-everywhere procedure is overly complicated, a simple map will do the trick. Try this:

(define (insert-everywhere sym los)
  (map (lambda (i)
         (insert-at i sym los))
       (generate-all-pos 1 (add1 (length los)))))

Also notice that in Racket there exists a procedure called range, so you don't need to implement your own generate-all-pos:

(define (insert-everywhere sym los)
  (map (lambda (i)
         (insert-at i sym los))
       (range 1 (+ 2 (length los)))))

Either way, it works as expected:

(insert-everywhere 'r '(1 2 3))
=> '((r 1 2 3) (1 r 2 3) (1 2 r 3) (1 2 3 r))
share|improve this answer
    
lambda: found a lambda that is not a function definition –  user2969733 Nov 21 '13 at 16:14
1  
Oops, this was my bad, I forgot to set the language, it works now. Sorry. –  user2969733 Nov 21 '13 at 16:17

Óscar López's answer shows how you can do this in terms of the procedures that you've already defined. I'd like to point out a way to do this that recurses down the input list. It uses an auxiliary function called revappend (I've taken the name from Common Lisp's revappend). revappend takes a list and a tail, and efficiently returns the same thing that (append (reverse list) tail) would.

(define (revappend list tail)
  (if (null? list)
      tail
      (revappend (rest list)
                 (list* (first list) tail))))

> (revappend '(3 2 1) '(4 5 6))
'(1 2 3 4 5 6)

The reason that we're interested in such a function is that as we recurse down the input list, we can build up a list of the elements we've already seen, but it's in reverse order. That is, as we walk down (1 2 3 4 5), it's easy to have:

rhead       tail        (revappend rhead (list* item tail))
----------- ----------- -----------------------------------
         () (1 2 3 4 5) (r 1 2 3 4 5)
        (1) (2 3 4 5)   (1 r 2 3 4 5)
      (2 1) (3 4 5)     (1 2 r 3 4 5)
    (3 2 1) (4 5)       (1 2 3 r 4 5)
  (4 3 2 1) (5)         (1 2 3 4 r 5)
(5 4 3 2 1) ()          (1 2 3 4 5 r)

In each of these cases, (revappend rhead (list* item tail)) returns a list with item inserted in one of the positions. Thus, we can define insert-everywhere in terms of rhead and tail, and revappend, if we build up the results list in reverse order, and reverse it at the end of the loop.

(define (insert-everywhere item list)
  (let ie ((tail list)
           (rhead '())
           (results '()))
    (if (null? tail)
        (reverse (list* (revappend rhead (list* item tail)) results))
        (ie (rest tail)
            (list* (first tail) rhead)
            (list* (revappend rhead (list* item tail)) results))))) 

(insert-everywhere 'r '(1 2 3))
;=> '((r 1 2 3) (1 r 2 3) (1 2 r 3) (1 2 3 r))

What's interesting about this is that the sublists all share the same tail structure. That is, the sublists share the structure as indicated in the following “diagram.”

;=> '((r 1 2 3) (1 r 2 3) (1 2 r 3) (1 2 3 r))
;        -----       +++         o   
;          +++         o
;            o
share|improve this answer
    
(list* a b) === (cons a b), yes? :) --- BTW my answer at the other question has the same sharing I think; looks like it's doing the same thing as this your version (before the appending), only you re-implement map here. :) –  Will Ness Dec 2 '13 at 18:18
    
well, obviously, not the same thing....... mine's working "by rows" and yours "by columns" so to speak. –  Will Ness Dec 2 '13 at 18:27
    
@WillNess list* is like cons when there are just two elements, but list* can take one argument, in which case (list* x) = x, and more than two, in which case (list* a b ... c) = (cons a (cons b (list* ... c))). It's available in Common Lisp and Racket. I've been trying to use it in preference to cons lately (along with first and rest instead of car and cdr) to promote list processing instead of cons-cell processing. –  Joshua Taylor Dec 2 '13 at 18:38

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