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I have a file whose format is as follows:

pool1 {
  name:$NAME
  mode:$MODE
  address:$ADDRESS
  validity:$VALIDITY
     }

pool2 {
  name:$NAME
  mode:$MODE
  address:$ADDRESS
  validity:$VALIDITY
     }


pool3 {
  name:$NAME
  mode:$MODE
  version:$VERSION
  address:$ADDRESS
  validity:$VALIDITY
     }

I have a list of Addresses in another file.While I loop through the addresses file,I need to find the name of the respective address in this file.The problem is that the number of parameters within a pool is not fixed and keeps varying as is evident in pool 3 where a new parameter called version pops up..Hence I cannot do a normal grep for a address and then again grep for 2 lines above it.What I need is a command that will search for the occurrence of the line "address:$ADDRESS" and then find the occurrence of "name:$NAME" that occurs just prior to it..

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closed as off-topic by amon, fedorqui, Flimzy, jkshah, HamZa Nov 22 '13 at 16:44

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – amon, fedorqui, jkshah, HamZa
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Not very clear to me... Could you indicate the desired output? – fedorqui Nov 21 '13 at 16:08
    
i have a source file with 10 lines each having a unique address:$ADDRESS line.For every address:$ADDRESS,i need to find the name:$NAME in this file.. – Amistad Nov 21 '13 at 16:11
    
What is meant by $ADDRESS? In the above pool file, each pool have the same address if $ADDRESS is taken literally. So I guess it only makes sense if $ADDRESS is replaced by a real address.. Then the real file contains e.g. address:123 Main Street ? – Håkon Hægland Nov 21 '13 at 19:16

Is this what you're looking for?

$ cat file
pool1 {
  name:abc
  mode:$MODE
  address:foo
  validity:$VALIDITY
     }

pool2 {
  name:defghi
  mode:$MODE
  address:stuff
  validity:$VALIDITY
     }


pool3 {
  name:some other name
  mode:$MODE
  version:$VERSION
  address:bar
  validity:$VALIDITY
     }
$
$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN { RS=""; FS="\n" }
{
    split("",name2val)          # or delete(name2val) with gawk
    for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
        line = $i
        gsub(/^[[:space:]]+|[[:space:]]+$/,"",line)
        if ( split(line,tmp,/:/) == 2 ) {
            name2val[tmp[1]] = tmp[2]
        }
    }

    if ( name2val["address"] == tgt ) {
        print name2val["name"]
    }
}
$
$ awk -v tgt="stuff" -f tst.awk file
defghi

If not update your question with a better example and expected output.

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You could use range patterns with awk, and within each range, print the name if the address matches. The address can of course be passed in via the command line using -v

awk -vaddress=address3 '/pool.*\{/,/\}/{if ($0 ~ /name/)name=$0; 
    if($0 ~ address) print name}' file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
is it awk -vaddress=address3 or awk -v address=address3...Also is address3 the value of the address i want to search ? – Amistad Nov 21 '13 at 16:19
    
@Amistad, with GNU awk, both forms work with -v, YMMV depending on your version of awk. Yes, address3 is the value of the address you need to search – iruvar Nov 21 '13 at 16:21

This might get you started:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict; 
use Data::Dumper;
$Data::Dumper::Sortkeys = 1;


my $infile = 'in.txt';
open my $input, '<', $infile or die "Can't open to $infile: $!";

my (@pool, @address, @name, %hash);
while (<$input>){
    chomp;
    push @pool, $1 if ($_ =~ /(pool\d+)\s+\{/g);
    push @address, $1 if ($_ =~ /address:(.+)/g);
    push @name, $1 if ($_ =~ /name:(.+)/g);
}

push @{$hash{$pool[$_]} }, [$address[$_], $name[$_] ] for 0 .. $#pool;

print Dumper \%hash;

Which gives you a hash of arrays as such:

$VAR1 = {
          'pool1' => [
                       [
                         '$ADDRESS',
                         '$NAME'
                       ]
                     ],
          'pool2' => [
                       [
                         '$ADDRESS',
                         '$NAME'
                       ]
                     ],
          'pool3' => [
                       [
                         '$ADDRESS',
                         '$NAME'
                       ]
                     ]
        };

Now you can read in your file containing addresses and check to see if they exist in the above hash

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Seems like a good start is to just print the pool you are interested in, and that's trivial with awk. For example:

awk '/\n  address:pattern/' RS= input-file

will only print those pools for which the address matches pattern. By setting RS to the empty string, awk treats paragraphs (blocks of text separated by a blank line) as single records. In the ideal world, it would be simple for awk to reparse that record into a dictionary and print the name, but it's really simpler to pipe the output to another awk:

awk '/\n  address:pattern/' RS= input-file | awk '/^  name/'
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