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How to creating a Confidence Ellipses in a sccatterplot using matplotlib?

The following code works until creating scatter plot. Then, does anyone familiar with putting Confidence Ellipses over the scatter plot?

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
x = [5,7,11,15,16,17,18]
y = [8, 5, 8, 9, 17, 18, 25]

plt.scatter(x,y)
plt.show()

Following is the reference for Confidence Ellipses from SAS.

http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/grstatproc/62603/HTML/default/viewer.htm#a003160800.htm

The code in sas is like this:

proc sgscatter data=sashelp.iris(where=(species="Versicolor"));
  title "Versicolor Length and Width";
  compare y=(sepalwidth petalwidth)
          x=(sepallength petallength)
          / reg ellipse=(type=mean) spacing=4;
run;
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1  
possible duplicate of multidimensional confidence intervals –  Saullo Castro Nov 21 '13 at 16:35
2  
@ Saullo Castro have you seen the code in sas and do you think that the method implemented in sas and in the link you provided the same? –  2964502 Nov 21 '13 at 16:42
2  
@tester3 - In the example you linked to, the confidence ellipse shown is for the mean, as opposed to for another sample drawn from the same population. (This is what type=mean is specifying.) My answer that @SaulloCastro linked to shows a confidence ellipse for the entire population (in other words, the area that another sample from the population should fall inside, identical to type=predicted in SAS). Jamie's answer uses this method as well. –  Joe Kington Nov 21 '13 at 23:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The following code draws a one, two, and three standard deviation sized ellipses:

x = [5,7,11,15,16,17,18]
y = [8, 5, 8, 9, 17, 18, 25]
cov = np.cov(x, y)
lambda_, v = np.linalg.eig(cov)
lambda_ = np.sqrt(lambda_)
from matplotlib.patches import Ellipse
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
ax = plt.subplot(111, aspect='equal')
for j in xrange(1, 4):
    ell = Ellipse(xy=(np.mean(x), np.mean(y)),
                  width=lambda_[0]*j*2, height=lambda_[1]*j*2,
                  angle=np.rad2deg(np.arccos(v[0, 0])))
    ell.set_facecolor('none')
    ax.add_artist(ell)
plt.scatter(x, y)
plt.show()

enter image description here

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1  
@Jamie - +1 Shouldn't the ellipses be twice as wide and high, though? Currently, they're N-sigma wide and high, as opposed to showing the region within N-sigma of the mean. –  Joe Kington Nov 21 '13 at 19:18
    
@JoeKington Yes, I do think you are absolutely right, matplotlib makes it kind of clear they are the width and height, not the semi-width and semi-height... Have edited the code and image. Thanks! –  Jaime Nov 21 '13 at 19:55

After giving the accepted answer a go, I found that it doesn't choose the quadrant correctly when calculating theta, as it relies on np.arccos:

oops

Taking a look at the 'possible duplicate' and Joe Kington's solution on github, I watered his code down to this: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from matplotlib.patches import Ellipse

def eigsorted(cov):
    vals, vecs = np.linalg.eigh(cov)
    order = vals.argsort()[::-1]
    return vals[order], vecs[:,order]

x = [5,7,11,15,16,17,18]
y = [25, 18, 17, 9, 8, 5, 8]

nstd = 2
ax = plt.subplot(111)

cov = np.cov(x, y)
vals, vecs = eigsorted(cov)
theta = np.degrees(np.arctan2(*vecs[:,0][::-1]))
w, h = 2 * nstd * np.sqrt(vals)
ell = Ellipse(xy=(np.mean(x), np.mean(y)),
              width=w, height=h,
              angle=theta, color='black')
ell.set_facecolor('none')
ax.add_artist(ell)
plt.scatter(x, y)
plt.show()

neg slope

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