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I am trying to get my head around public key encryption using the openssl implementation of rsa in C++. Can you help? So far these are my thoughts (please do correct if necessary)

  1. Alice is connected to Bob over a network
  2. Alice and Bob want secure communications
  3. Alice generates a public / private key pair and sends public key to Bob
  4. Bob receives public key and encrypts a randomly generated symmetric cypher key (e.g. blowfish) with the public key and sends the result to Alice
  5. Alice decrypts the ciphertext with the originally generated private key and obtains the symmetric blowfish key
  6. Alice and Bob now both have knowledge of symmetric blowfish key and can establish a secure communication channel

Now, I have looked at the openssl/rsa.h rsa implementation (since I already have practical experience with openssl/blowfish.h), and I see these two functions:

int RSA_public_encrypt(int flen, unsigned char *from,
unsigned char *to, RSA *rsa, int padding);
int RSA_private_decrypt(int flen, unsigned char *from,
 unsigned char *to, RSA *rsa, int padding);

If Alice is to generate *rsa, how does this yield the rsa key pair? Is there something like rsa_public and rsa_private which are derived from rsa? Does *rsa contain both public and private key and the above function automatically strips out the necessary key depending on whether it requires the public or private part? Should two unique *rsa pointers be generated so that actually, we have the following:

int RSA_public_encrypt(int flen, unsigned char *from,
unsigned char *to, RSA *rsa_public, int padding);
int RSA_private_decrypt(int flen, unsigned char *from,
 unsigned char *to, RSA *rsa_private, int padding);

Secondly, in what format should the *rsa public key be sent to Bob? Must it be reinterpreted in to a character array and then sent the standard way? I've heard something about certificates -- are they anything to do with it?

Sorry for all the questions, Best Wishes, Ben.

EDIT: Coe I am currently employing:

/*
 *  theEncryptor.cpp
 *  
 *
 *  Created by ben on 14/01/2010.
 *  Copyright 2010 __MyCompanyName__. All rights reserved.
 *
 */

#include "theEncryptor.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sstream>

theEncryptor::theEncryptor()
{

}

void
theEncryptor::blowfish(unsigned char *data, int data_len, unsigned char* key, int enc)
{

    //  hash the key first! 
    unsigned char obuf[20];
    bzero(obuf,20);
    SHA1((const unsigned char*)key, 64, obuf);

    BF_KEY bfkey;
    int keySize = 16;//strlen((char*)key);
    BF_set_key(&bfkey, keySize, obuf);

    unsigned char ivec[16];
    memset(ivec, 0, 16);

    unsigned char* out=(unsigned char*) malloc(data_len);
    bzero(out,data_len);
    int num = 0;
    BF_cfb64_encrypt(data, out, data_len, &bfkey, ivec, &num, enc);

    //for(int i = 0;i<data_len;i++)data[i]=out[i];

    memcpy(data, out, data_len);
    free(out);  

}

void
theEncryptor::generateRSAKeyPair(int bits)
{
    rsa = RSA_generate_key(bits, 65537, NULL, NULL);
}


int
theEncryptor::publicEncrypt(unsigned char* data, unsigned char* dataEncrypted,int dataLen)
{   
    return RSA_public_encrypt(dataLen, data, dataEncrypted, rsa, RSA_PKCS1_OAEP_PADDING);   
}

int
theEncryptor::privateDecrypt(unsigned char* dataEncrypted,
                             unsigned char* dataDecrypted)
{
    return RSA_private_decrypt(RSA_size(rsa), dataEncrypted, 
                                   dataDecrypted, rsa, RSA_PKCS1_OAEP_PADDING);
}

void 
theEncryptor::receivePublicKeyAndSetRSA(int sock, int bits)
{
    int max_hex_size = (bits / 4) + 1;
    char keybufA[max_hex_size];
    bzero(keybufA,max_hex_size);
    char keybufB[max_hex_size];
    bzero(keybufB,max_hex_size);
    int n = recv(sock,keybufA,max_hex_size,0); 
    n = send(sock,"OK",2,0);
    n = recv(sock,keybufB,max_hex_size,0); 
    n = send(sock,"OK",2,0); 
    rsa = RSA_new();
    BN_hex2bn(&rsa->n, keybufA);
    BN_hex2bn(&rsa->e, keybufB);
}

void 
theEncryptor::transmitPublicKey(int sock, int bits)
{
    const int max_hex_size = (bits / 4) + 1;
    long size = max_hex_size;
    char keyBufferA[size];
    char keyBufferB[size];
    bzero(keyBufferA,size);
    bzero(keyBufferB,size);
    sprintf(keyBufferA,"%s\r\n",BN_bn2hex(rsa->n));
    sprintf(keyBufferB,"%s\r\n",BN_bn2hex(rsa->e));
    int n = send(sock,keyBufferA,size,0);
    char recBuf[2];
    n = recv(sock,recBuf,2,0);
    n = send(sock,keyBufferB,size,0);
    n = recv(sock,recBuf,2,0);
}

void
theEncryptor::generateRandomBlowfishKey(unsigned char* key, int bytes)
{
            /*
    srand( (unsigned)time( NULL ) );
    std::ostringstream stm;
    for(int i = 0;i<bytes;i++){
        int randomValue = 65 + rand()% 26;
        stm << (char)((int)randomValue);
    }
    std::string str(stm.str());
    const char* strs = str.c_str();
    for(int i = 0;bytes;i++)key[i]=strs[i];
            */

    int n = RAND_bytes(key, bytes);

    if(n==0)std::cout<<"Warning key was generated with bad entropy. You should not consider communication to be secure"<<std::endl;

}

theEncryptor::~theEncryptor(){}
share|improve this question
    
Note that your proposed scheme is vulnerable to this: 3a) Eve intercepts Alice's public key. 3b) Eve generates public/private key pair and sends public key to Bob, claiming to be Alice. 4a) Eve intercepts encrypted symmetric key and decrypts it with her private key. 4b) Eve re-encrypts the symmetric key with Alice's public key and sends it to Alice, claiming to be Bob. Alice, Bob and Eve (unbeknowst to Alice and Bob) now all share same the symmetric key. Eve is free to decrypt all subsequent data sent between Alice and Bob. –  caf Jan 11 '10 at 4:28
    
God, you're absolutely right. Thanks kindly for pointing it out :-) –  Ben J Jan 11 '10 at 16:10
    
I've updated my answer showing how to use the EVP_Seal*() functions - they're pretty good once you have a working example to look at, it's the documentation that's a bit lacking. –  caf Jan 14 '10 at 3:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You should actually be using the higher-level "Envelope Encryption" functions from openssl/evp.h, rather than the low-level RSA functions directly. These do most of the work for you and mean you don't have to reinvent the wheel.

In this case, you'd use the EVP_SealInit(), EVP_SealUpdate() and EVP_SealFinal() functions. The corresponding decryption functions are EVP_OpenInit(), EVP_OpenUpdate() and EVP_OpenFinal(). I would suggest using EVP_aes_128_cbc() as the value of the cipher type parameter.

Once you've got the public key loaded into an RSA * handle, you use EVP_PKEY_assign_RSA() to put it into an EVP_PKEY * handle for the EVP functions.

Once you've got this going, to solve the authentication problem I mentioned in my comment, you'll need to established a trusted authority ("Trent"). Trent's public key is known to all users (distributed with the application or similar - just load it from a PEM file). Instead of exchanging bare RSA parameters, Alice and Bob exchange x509 certificates that contain their RSA public keys together with their name, and are signed by Trent. Alice and Bob then each verify the certificate they recieved from the other (using Trent's public key, which they already know), including checking that the associated name is the right one, before continuing the protocol. OpenSSL includes functions for loading and verifying certificates in the x509.h header.


Here's an example of how to use EVP_Seal*() to encrypt a file given the recipient's public key. It takes the PEM RSA Public Key file (ie as generated by openssl rsa -pubout) as a command line argument, reads the source data from stdin and writes the encrypted data to stdout. To decrypt, use EVP_Open*() instead, and PEM_read_RSAPrivateKey() to read a private key rather than public key.

It's not really that hard - and certainly less error prone than messing about generating padding, IVs and so on yourself (the Seal function does both the RSA and AES parts of the deal). Anyway, the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include <openssl/evp.h>
#include <openssl/pem.h>
#include <openssl/rsa.h>
#include <openssl/err.h>

#include <arpa/inet.h> /* For htonl() */

int do_evp_seal(FILE *rsa_pkey_file, FILE *in_file, FILE *out_file)
{
    int retval = 0;
    RSA *rsa_pkey = NULL;
    EVP_PKEY *pkey = EVP_PKEY_new();
    EVP_CIPHER_CTX ctx;
    unsigned char buffer[4096];
    unsigned char buffer_out[4096 + EVP_MAX_IV_LENGTH];
    size_t len;
    int len_out;
    unsigned char *ek;
    int eklen;
    uint32_t eklen_n;
    unsigned char iv[EVP_MAX_IV_LENGTH];

    if (!PEM_read_RSA_PUBKEY(rsa_pkey_file, &rsa_pkey, NULL, NULL))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error loading RSA Public Key File.\n");
        ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
        retval = 2;
        goto out;
    }

    if (!EVP_PKEY_assign_RSA(pkey, rsa_pkey))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "EVP_PKEY_assign_RSA: failed.\n");
        retval = 3;
        goto out;
    }

    EVP_CIPHER_CTX_init(&ctx);
    ek = malloc(EVP_PKEY_size(pkey));

    if (!EVP_SealInit(&ctx, EVP_aes_128_cbc(), &ek, &eklen, iv, &pkey, 1))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "EVP_SealInit: failed.\n");
        retval = 3;
        goto out_free;
    }

    /* First we write out the encrypted key length, then the encrypted key,
     * then the iv (the IV length is fixed by the cipher we have chosen).
     */

    eklen_n = htonl(eklen);
    if (fwrite(&eklen_n, sizeof eklen_n, 1, out_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("output file");
        retval = 5;
        goto out_free;
    }
    if (fwrite(ek, eklen, 1, out_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("output file");
        retval = 5;
        goto out_free;
    }
    if (fwrite(iv, EVP_CIPHER_iv_length(EVP_aes_128_cbc()), 1, out_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("output file");
        retval = 5;
        goto out_free;
    }

    /* Now we process the input file and write the encrypted data to the
     * output file. */

    while ((len = fread(buffer, 1, sizeof buffer, in_file)) > 0)
    {
        if (!EVP_SealUpdate(&ctx, buffer_out, &len_out, buffer, len))
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "EVP_SealUpdate: failed.\n");
            retval = 3;
            goto out_free;
        }

        if (fwrite(buffer_out, len_out, 1, out_file) != 1)
        {
            perror("output file");
            retval = 5;
            goto out_free;
        }
    }

    if (ferror(in_file))
    {
        perror("input file");
        retval = 4;
        goto out_free;
    }

    if (!EVP_SealFinal(&ctx, buffer_out, &len_out))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "EVP_SealFinal: failed.\n");
        retval = 3;
        goto out_free;
    }

    if (fwrite(buffer_out, len_out, 1, out_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("output file");
        retval = 5;
        goto out_free;
    }

    out_free:
    EVP_PKEY_free(pkey);
    free(ek);

    out:
    return retval;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    FILE *rsa_pkey_file;
    int rv;

    if (argc < 2)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s <PEM RSA Public Key File>\n", argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }

    rsa_pkey_file = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    if (!rsa_pkey_file)
    {
        perror(argv[1]);
        fprintf(stderr, "Error loading PEM RSA Public Key File.\n");
        exit(2);
    }

    rv = do_evp_seal(rsa_pkey_file, stdin, stdout);

    fclose(rsa_pkey_file);
    return rv;
}

The code you've posted illustrates nicely why you should use the higher-level functions - you've fallen into a couple of pitfalls:

  • rand() is emphatically not a cryptographically strong random number generator! Generating your symmetric key using rand() is enough to make the entire system completely insecure. (The EVP_*() functions generate the necessary random numbers themselves, using a cryptographically strong RNG, seeded from an appropriate entropy source).

  • You are setting the IV for CFB mode to a fixed value (zero). This negates any advantage of using CFB mode in the first place (allowing attackers to trivially perform block-replacement attacks and worse). (The EVP_*() functions generate an appropriate IV for you, when required).

  • RSA_PKCS1_OAEP_PADDING should be used if you're defining a new protocol, rather than interoperating with an existing protocol.


The corresponding decryption code, for posterity:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include <openssl/evp.h>
#include <openssl/pem.h>
#include <openssl/rsa.h>
#include <openssl/err.h>

#include <arpa/inet.h> /* For htonl() */

int do_evp_unseal(FILE *rsa_pkey_file, FILE *in_file, FILE *out_file)
{
    int retval = 0;
    RSA *rsa_pkey = NULL;
    EVP_PKEY *pkey = EVP_PKEY_new();
    EVP_CIPHER_CTX ctx;
    unsigned char buffer[4096];
    unsigned char buffer_out[4096 + EVP_MAX_IV_LENGTH];
    size_t len;
    int len_out;
    unsigned char *ek;
    unsigned int eklen;
    uint32_t eklen_n;
    unsigned char iv[EVP_MAX_IV_LENGTH];

    if (!PEM_read_RSAPrivateKey(rsa_pkey_file, &rsa_pkey, NULL, NULL))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error loading RSA Private Key File.\n");
        ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
        retval = 2;
        goto out;
    }

    if (!EVP_PKEY_assign_RSA(pkey, rsa_pkey))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "EVP_PKEY_assign_RSA: failed.\n");
        retval = 3;
        goto out;
    }

    EVP_CIPHER_CTX_init(&ctx);
    ek = malloc(EVP_PKEY_size(pkey));

    /* First need to fetch the encrypted key length, encrypted key and IV */

    if (fread(&eklen_n, sizeof eklen_n, 1, in_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("input file");
        retval = 4;
        goto out_free;
    }
    eklen = ntohl(eklen_n);
    if (eklen > EVP_PKEY_size(pkey))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Bad encrypted key length (%u > %d)\n", eklen,
            EVP_PKEY_size(pkey));
        retval = 4;
        goto out_free;
    }
    if (fread(ek, eklen, 1, in_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("input file");
        retval = 4;
        goto out_free;
    }
    if (fread(iv, EVP_CIPHER_iv_length(EVP_aes_128_cbc()), 1, in_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("input file");
        retval = 4;
        goto out_free;
    }

    if (!EVP_OpenInit(&ctx, EVP_aes_128_cbc(), ek, eklen, iv, pkey))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "EVP_OpenInit: failed.\n");
        retval = 3;
        goto out_free;
    }

    while ((len = fread(buffer, 1, sizeof buffer, in_file)) > 0)
    {
        if (!EVP_OpenUpdate(&ctx, buffer_out, &len_out, buffer, len))
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "EVP_OpenUpdate: failed.\n");
            retval = 3;
            goto out_free;
        }

        if (fwrite(buffer_out, len_out, 1, out_file) != 1)
        {
            perror("output file");
            retval = 5;
            goto out_free;
        }
    }

    if (ferror(in_file))
    {
        perror("input file");
        retval = 4;
        goto out_free;
    }

    if (!EVP_OpenFinal(&ctx, buffer_out, &len_out))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "EVP_OpenFinal: failed.\n");
        retval = 3;
        goto out_free;
    }

    if (fwrite(buffer_out, len_out, 1, out_file) != 1)
    {
        perror("output file");
        retval = 5;
        goto out_free;
    }

    out_free:
    EVP_PKEY_free(pkey);
    free(ek);

    out:
    return retval;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    FILE *rsa_pkey_file;
    int rv;

    if (argc < 2)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s <PEM RSA Private Key File>\n", argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }

    rsa_pkey_file = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    if (!rsa_pkey_file)
    {
        perror(argv[1]);
        fprintf(stderr, "Error loading PEM RSA Private Key File.\n");
        exit(2);
    }

    rv = do_evp_unseal(rsa_pkey_file, stdin, stdout);

    fclose(rsa_pkey_file);
    return rv;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again caf, your input in much appreciated. However, I have looked at the EVP calls before but for whatever reason, they seem far too long winded and complicated and that actually its far easier, implementation-wise, IMHO, to call the RSA functions and in fact many of the openssl functions directly. I understand how to do this, but I don't understand how to use the EVP calls. –  Ben J Jan 13 '10 at 9:28
    
With regards to the certificate thing, that certainly makes sense. Yesterday, I read that given the original scheme I outlined above, Alice should sign her public key which can then be checked by Bob for authenticity, I also came to understand that this wouldn't oversome the vulnerability you mention above, which I guess is why its necessary to publish the public key and store it as a certificate with a trusted authority –  Ben J Jan 13 '10 at 9:29
    
Thanks for your code caf -- but again, I still think its easier to bypass the EVP functions and call stuff directly....but then, I prob just need to learn to use them...I have edited my original post with a class which encapsulates the way in which I process stuff...Cheers. –  Ben J Jan 14 '10 at 21:04
3  
If you think it's simpler to call the low-level functions directly, that's a good indicator that you're doing something wrong. It's very easy to build something that looks like it works, but is actually insecure - even trivially insecure. See my latest update. –  caf Jan 14 '10 at 22:40
1  
@Pawan: Done (sorry for the delay ;) –  caf Feb 23 '12 at 6:46

Actually, no problem, I have just read that basically, the RSA object is a structure that contains both public and private fields. One can extract the public field data and only send that to Bob.

I.e. basically, to extract the public fields from rsa and store each in two different buffers (which are char arrays and can then be sent to Bob), you do:

sprintf(keyBufferA,"%s\r\n",BN_bn2hex(rsa->n));
sprintf(keyBufferB,"%s\r\n",BN_bn2hex(rsa->e));

And then Bob, on the receiving end, reconstructs as follows:

rsa = RSA_new();
BN_hex2bn(&rsa->n, keybufA);
BN_hex2bn(&rsa->e, keybufB);

Bob can then use rsa* to publicly encrypt the symmetric cypher key which can then be sent to Alice. Alice can then decrypt with the private key

Ben.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that a very good tutorial is to be found here: rohitab.com/discuss/index.php?showtopic=28473 –  Ben J Jan 6 '10 at 12:17

Thanks @caf!

I was having problems trying to load a public key (generated with openssl rsa -pubout) while using the function PEM_read_RSAPublicKey. I keep on getting the following error:

23260:error:0906D06C:PEM routines:PEM_read_bio:no start line:/SourceCache/OpenSSL098/OpenSSL098-32/src/crypto/pem/pem_lib.c:650:Expecting: RSA PUBLIC KEY

But looking at your example the function to call is PEM_read_RSA_PUBKEY and now it works!

Now if I can only figure out how to load an encrypted private key without getting the following error: 23328:error:0906B072:PEM routines:PEM_get_EVP_CIPHER_INFO:unsupported encryption:/SourceCache/OpenSSL098/OpenSSL098-32/src/crypto/pem/pem_lib.c:484:

Have tried various encryption schemes.

EDIT: Just needed to call OpenSSL_add_all_algorithms() found in

share|improve this answer
    
For me, adding OpenSSL_add_all_ciphers(); solved the unsupported encryption error. –  Aru Aug 25 at 15:18

I write two examples around CAF's code. They are heavily modifed and uses OpenSSL's BIO container for more abstraction.

One example uses a file as input and the other example uses a string buffer. It uses RSA and DES, however you can easily change it from the code. Compile instructions are inside the code. I needed a working example, I hope someone find this useful. I also commented the code. You can get it from here:

Take file as input: https://github.com/farslan/snippets/blob/master/hybrid_file.c

Take string buffer as input: https://github.com/farslan/snippets/blob/master/hybrid_data.c

share|improve this answer

Thanks @Caf. Your post helped. However I got

The program '[7056] Encryption2.exe: Native' has exited with code -1073741811 (0xc000000d) for the line

  PEM_read_RSA_PUBKEY(rsa_pkey_file, &rsa_pkey, NULL, NULL)

I changed to

BIO *bio;
X509 *certificate;

bio = BIO_new(BIO_s_mem());
BIO_puts(bio, (const char*)data);
certificate = PEM_read_bio_X509(bio, NULL, NULL, NULL);
EVP_PKEY *pubkey = X509_get_pubkey (certificate);
rsa_pkey = EVP_PKEY_get1_RSA(pubkey);

Where data has the PEM file with only public key. My challenge was to encrypt in C++ and decrypt in java. I transmitted the base64 encoded ek of size eklen (i did not use eklen_n) and decrypted to get the AES key using the RSA private key. Then I decrypted the cipher file using this AES key. It worked fine.

share|improve this answer

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