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Say I'm writing a routine in x86 assembly, like, "add" which adds two numbers passed as arguments.

For the most part this is a very simple method:

push ebp
mov ebp, esp
mov eax, [ebp+8]
add eax, [ebp+12]
mov esp, ebp
pop ebp
ret

But, is there any way I could rewrite this method to avoid the use of the "ret" instruction and still have it produce the exact same result?

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3  
And... why would you want to write a routine without using RET? – mcleod_ideafix Nov 21 '13 at 18:38
3  
@mcleod_ideafix: this routine certainly is convenient to write with RET. However, it is quite common in assembler to have various values in the stack when the function is entered; sometime it is convenient to pick the return address out of the stack, clean up the stack with an lea instruction, and then jmp indirect. I do a lot of really high-performance assembler coding in a runtime system for a parallel programming langauge; this occurs more often then you'd expect. And if you are writing really pure vanilla assembly code, why are you writing assembly code at all? – Ira Baxter Nov 21 '13 at 22:11
    
you can do that with other instructions but the performance will not be optimize because of the reason here – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Apr 16 '15 at 17:26
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This does not need any free registers to simulate ret, but it needs 4 bytes of memory (a dword). Uses indirect jmp. Edit: As noted by Ira Baxter, this code is not reentrant. Works fine in single-threaded code. Will crash if used in multithreaded code.

push ebp
mov  ebp, esp
mov  eax, [ebp+8]
add  eax, [ebp+12]
mov  ebp, [ebp+4]
mov  [return_address], ebp
pop  ebp

add  esp,4
jmp  [return_address]

.data
return_address dd 0

To replace only the ret instruction, without changing the rest of the code. Not reentrant. Do not use in multithreaded code. Edit: fixed bug in below code.

push ebp
mov  ebp, esp
mov  ebp, [ebp+4]
mov  [return_address], ebp
pop  ebp

add  esp,4
jmp  [return_address]

.data
return_address dd 0
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1  
That works, but it isn't reentrant and would be disasterous in any kind of multithreaded code. – Ira Baxter Nov 21 '13 at 22:07
    
@IraBaxter Thanks for the advice. Appropriate warning added. – nrz Nov 21 '13 at 22:14
    
Another caution: if you modify the instruction stream, the modification may not be seen by the CPU. The implementation-dependent instruction fetcher grabs a chunk of code periodically; it may grab code that you are about to modify, and then the modificications won't be seen, and a crash will result. So as written, this is pretty unsafe. There are instructions to force the instruction stream to be refetched, to handle this case. Frankly, using the registers is small, better and faster. – Ira Baxter Feb 29 at 23:22
    
Why this could would not work on multithread? – Murillo Henrique Mar 28 at 0:15

Sure.

push ebp
mov ebp, esp
mov eax, [ebp+8]
add eax, [ebp+12]
mov esp, ebp
pop ebp

pop ecx  ; these two instructions simulate "ret"
jmp ecx

This assumes you have a free register (e.g, ecx). Writing an equivalent that uses "no registers" is possible (after all the x86 is a Turing machine) but is likely to include a lot of convoluted register and stack shuffling.

Most current OSes offer thread-specific storage accessible by one of the segment registers. You could then simulate "ret" this way, safely:

 pop   gs:preallocated_tls_slot  ; pick one
 jmp   gs:preallocated_tls_slot
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2  
Something like add esp,4 / jmp [esp-4] maybe? By the way, shouldn't the jump in your version be jmp ecx ? – Michael Nov 21 '13 at 18:36
3  
Yes, should have been "jmp ecx", fixed. Your "add esp,4/jmp [esp-4]" doesn't simulate what ret does; it is in fact completely unsafe. There is no gaurantee that an interrupt won't happen between the "add esp,4" and the "jmp [esp-4]", which would trash your return address. – Ira Baxter Nov 21 '13 at 20:09
    
@Griwes: How does that "sti" instruction get executed? The jmp happens first. And, this doesn't prevent your friendly native OS from interrupting you. – Ira Baxter Nov 21 '13 at 22:08

Haven't tested, but you may be able to do a ret without using a GPR like this:

add esp,4
jmp dword ptr [esp-4]
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3  
Not safe; an interrupt can trash the return address. If you "tested" this it would look like it works, but.... – Ira Baxter Nov 21 '13 at 20:10
    
btw: dowrd->dword ;-) – Artur Nov 21 '13 at 21:07
    
@Ira Baxter: In user space (CPL = 3) this should work because interrupts use the CPL0 stack (separate ESP) - assuming that there is no "signal" in Linux that would also destroy the stack. – Martin Rosenau Nov 21 '13 at 21:27
    
@MartinRosenau: I thought any interrupt (OS, trap, whatever) pushed at least 3 words on the current stack before any kind of stack switch for tasks tool place. Can you quote chapter and verse in some Intel document? – Ira Baxter Nov 21 '13 at 22:13
push ebp
mov  ebp, esp
mov  ebp, [ebp+4]
mov  [return_address], ebp
nop
pop  ebp

add  esp,4
iret
jmp  [return_address]

.data
return_address dd 0

The nop instruction will deviatee process of the 8080 and skip mov,ebp if the value is not valid or executable and executing the next valid command-add esp,4 and jmp [return_address].It also prevents Killer .EXE from sinking its claws in as Killer.EXE kills bad 8 and 16 bit operations.In VCPI this can be a very frustrating error to debug.Also iret will set a far point return after add esp,4. This is not necessary but in all reagrds to debugging-and that is what you are doing , you are lookign for instruction to which does not uses 8bit mnemonics and wish to exclude them - as you instates this in your first code segment push ebp which is a base pointer.If teh error is ebp 8 bit registers set the nop command under push ebp [base pointer] to which is invalid pushes esp into ebp and delete second mov ebp,esp and enter an iret to where that line existed.

These are two viable options - but I am only a FLAT assembler so what do I know of modeals to whic exceed 2-D format.i ahve merely told you teh instruction to incur the debugging of a gui gpf which is a flat model 32 bit instructionreturn.

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