Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have the below SQL query that is taking an inordinate amount of time to run. Indexes have been added to all of the join fields in each table. Record counts for each table are as follows:

CRM.ASSET_PLUS:15,766,000

CRM.EMPLOYEE: 44,300

CRM.ACCOUNT: 1,180,000

CRM.DATA_NOTIFICATIONS: 500

CRM.PROD_INT: 87,800

What can I do to make this query more efficient?

SELECT D.NAME AS UP_ACCOUNT_NAME,
   B.FIRST_NAME,
   B.LAST_NAME
FROM CRM.ASSET_PLUS A, 
 CRM.EMPLOYEE B, 
 CRM.ACCOUNT C,
 CRM.ACCOUNT D, 
 CRM.DATA_NOTIFICATIONS E, 
 CRM.PROD_INT F
WHERE A.STATUS IN ('Active', 'Pending Install')
  AND E.PROD_DEF_OLD = F.X_ITEM_NUMBER
  AND F.ROW_ID = A.PRODUCT_ID
  AND C.UP_ACCOUNT_ID = D.ACCOUNT_ID
  AND C.ACCOUNT_ID = A.LOCATION_ACCOUNT_ID
  AND D.MANAGER_ID = B.EMPLOYEE_ID
  AND UPPER(D.NAME) LIKE '%BP%'
GROUP BY D.NAME,
     B.FIRST_NAME,
     B.LAST_NAME
share|improve this question
3  
What is your RDBMS? Assuming you have proper indexes, beside the fact that your join's are non-readable when you are doing them implicitly, I found no issue with your current query. What performance problems are you experiencing? – Yosi Dahari Nov 21 '13 at 19:47
    
And if it's SQL Server, then show us the Query Plan (actual is preferred over estimated). – RBarryYoung Nov 21 '13 at 19:50
    
It's an Oracle database. It just takes a very long time to run, around 5 minutes. – StephenT Nov 21 '13 at 19:51
1  
And what is the point of grouping if there is no aggregation function? You might as well use DISTINCT – Yosi Dahari Nov 21 '13 at 19:53
1  
How selective are those two predicates? What row count from the two tables match them? You also need to post the explain plan in order to get meaningful answers. – David Aldridge Nov 21 '13 at 22:07

Get rid off that group by. You are just selecting (account join employee) and using all other tables to filter it. You can get duplicated result and that's the only reason why you are using that group by.

But that's not necessary if you rewrite the query to move all other tables to the where clause.

I created a example to demonstrate it. and try to write explicit joins to separate filter and join predicates. example using SQL fiddle

share|improve this answer

First thing that I see here is that you use INNER JOIN and then WHERE statement. Use syntax table1 as t1 INNER JOIN table2 as t2 ON t1.key = t2.key.

So in where you will have only UPPER(D.NAME) LIKE '%BP%' AND A.STATUS IN ('Active', 'Pending Install') condition. It will allow DBMS to do lots of optimizations.

Also instead of INNER JOIN try to do LEFT JOIN where it possible. It will significantly decrease amount of rows in temp table.

share|improve this answer
1  
In Oracle this is unlikely to produce any change to the execution plan, and hence to the performance. Changing from inner to outer joins could change the result set, so would not be desirable -- not sure what you mean by the temp table comment, also. – David Aldridge Nov 21 '13 at 22:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.