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I'm programming a piece of software that uses message queues. I have a problem with it:

The main process creates 16 sons (with fork) and each son write a message for the next son. Then, they're waiting to receive their message. (The son "0" sends a message to the son "1", ..., the son "15" sends a message to the son "0").

It works well most of the time but sometimes, something weird happens... A process is never receiving it's message despite it was send by the corresponding son ! I would say that it occurs once after 10 successes.

I've been able to write a piece of code that has the bug:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <termios.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h>
#include <sys/msg.h>

struct buf
{
    long mtype;
    int data[32];
};

int main(int arc, char** argv)
{
    int son = 0;
    int pid = 0;
    struct buf msgbuf;

    key_t key;
    key = ftok(argv[0], 'O');

    int qid = msgget(key, IPC_CREAT | 0666);
    if(qid < 0)
    {
        printf("Error\n");
        return -1;
    }

    //Creates 16 sons
    for(int i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {
        pid = i;
        son = fork();
        if(son == 0)
            break;
    }

    if(son == 0)
    {
        msgbuf.mtype = ((pid + 1) % 16) + 1;
        for(int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
            msgbuf.data[i] = pid;
        printf("Writing %d\n", ((pid + 1) % 16) + 1);
        msgsnd(qid, &msgbuf, 32 * sizeof(int), IPC_NOWAIT);
        printf("Waiting for %d\n", pid + 1);
        msgrcv(qid, &msgbuf, 32 * sizeof(int), pid + 1, 0);
        printf("Got %d\n", (int)msgbuf.mtype);
    }

    sleep(3);
    printf("----- END -----\n");

    msgctl(qid, IPC_RMID, NULL);

    return 0;
}

So, the expected behavior is something like that:

Writing 2
Writing 3
Waiting for 1
Waiting for 2
Got 2
Writing 4
Waiting for 3
Got 3
Writing 5
Waiting for 4
Got 4
Writing 6
Waiting for 5
Got 5
Writing 7
Waiting for 6
Got 6
Writing 8
Waiting for 7
Got 7
Writing 9
Waiting for 8
Got 8
Writing 10
Waiting for 9
Got 9
Writing 11
Waiting for 10
Got 10
Writing 12
Waiting for 11
Got 11
Writing 13
Waiting for 12
Got 12
Writing 14
Waiting for 13
Got 13
Writing 15
Waiting for 14
Got 14
Writing 16
Waiting for 15
Got 15
Writing 1
Waiting for 16
Got 16
Got 1
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----

But sometimes, i've got something like that:

Writing 2
Writing 3
Waiting for 1
Waiting for 2
Got 2
Writing 4
Waiting for 3
Got 3
Writing 5
Waiting for 4
Got 4
Writing 6
Waiting for 5
Got 5
Writing 7
Waiting for 6
Got 6
Writing 9
Waiting for 8
Writing 8
Waiting for 7
Got 7
Got 8
Writing 10
Waiting for 9
Got 9
Writing 11
Waiting for 10
Got 10
Writing 12
Waiting for 11
Got 11
Writing 13
Writing 14
Waiting for 12
Waiting for 13
Got 12
Writing 15
Waiting for 14
Got 14
Writing 16
Waiting for 15
Got 15
Writing 1
Waiting for 16
Got 16
Got 1
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
Got 14
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----
----- END -----

As you can see, the message "14" is never received and after 3 seconds, the code frees the queue causes a fake "Got 14".

In my real code, I use semaphores to be sure that the program only exits after everybody receives his message. It implies that a deadlock occurs. Indeed, the message is never received, the semaphore is never "unlocked". So this is NOT because of the sleep time is too short or something like that. This is NOT because I delete the queue afterwards either.

But don't forget that most of the time, this is OK! I don't understand why sometime a son never gets his message.

Can you help me?

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3 Answers 3

First, a friendly pedantic nitpick regarding terminology: a forked process is customarily referred to by the more gender-neutral "child" rather than "son". :-)

Next, do you intentionally want to delay all of your worker children by 3 seconds before they exit? Because that's what the code currently does. All of the processes have to execute that sleep(3) before exiting. When testing your code, I rewrote that block as:

if (son > 0)
{
    sleep(1);
    printf("main program exiting\n");
}
else
{
    printf("(%d) ----- END -----\n", pid);
}

I think you are misinterpreting the results in that second output block. I'm theorizing that there might be some timing/buffering problems regarding your output, which can happen when multiple processes are trying to write to stdout simultaneously.

Can I ask what you're hoping to accomplish with this message queue? It seems like you're trying to arrange an assembly line of worker processes using the queue, which is not how these data structures are typically used.

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Thank for your answer!

The sleep call is here to be sure that everyone has the time to receive the message before freeing the queue

This is not an interpretation problem, the fact is that sometimes a child doesn't receive the message. If I put sleep(30),I will not have a "got" for the message until the sleep time is over and the queue is freed. (This not a real "got" but an artefact caused by the fact that the queue doesn't exist anymore.) What you see in the second example is that the child gets the message AFTER the queue has been freed, and it never gets it before that despite the message has been sent previously.

As I said, in my real program, I use semaphores instead of sleep to be sure that everybody got the message before freeing the queue. In that case, I have a deadlock because sometimes a child doesn't get the message and doesn't signal the semaphore.

Please note that this bug occurs only once over 10 or 15 runs of the program. Most of the time, everybody gets the message and everything is OK. But sometimes, a child waits for the message that has already been sent.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've finally found what happened.

When I write to the message queue, I do " msgsnd(qid, &msgbuf, 32 * sizeof(int), IPC_NOWAIT); ", the problem seems to be with "IPC_NOWAIT", it appears that sometimes the queue becomes full and the message is not actually written (it is skipped because of the flag "IPC_NOWAIT").

Without this flag, this is OK.

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