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I'm trying to initialize a const struct with a designated initializer. However, one of the struct elements is a fixed-width array. I already have the contents I would like to initialize the array with in another fixed-width array of appropriate size.

Is there any way to do this with a designated initializer? A simple (failing example) of what I'm trying to accomplish is demonstrated below.

struct foo {
    uint8_t array1[4];
    uint8_t array2[4];
}

uint8_t array[4] = {
    1, 2, 3, 4
};

struct foo const bar = {
   .array1 = array,     // incompatible pointer to integer conversion
   .array2 = { *array } // only copies the first element
};
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I assume that struct foo is defined with array1 and array2 as int [4]? It does work if the arrays are defined as pointers: int * array1. But obviously you lose information that way. –  Kninnug Nov 22 '13 at 0:25
    
@Kninnug, the data would be shared, not copied, but maybe that's ok. –  Charlie Burns Nov 22 '13 at 0:26
    
You could do it one by one, but that's kind of ugly and not very robust. –  Charlie Burns Nov 22 '13 at 0:26
    
@Kninnug Yes, I'll update the example to reflect that. –  Stephen Touset Nov 22 '13 at 0:36

3 Answers 3

If bar has global scope, or is declared static, then you won't be able use designated initializers to initialize from non-immediate values, regardless of whether or not the members in question are arrays.

However, if:

  1. bar is declared on the stack of some function, and
  2. Your fixed-size array really does only have 4 elements,

then you might be able to get away with something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

struct foo {
    uint8_t array1[4];
    uint8_t array2[4];
};

#define ARRAY_INIT(a) { a[0], a[1], a[2], a[3] }

int main (int argc, char **argv) {
    uint8_t arr_init[4] = {
        1, 2, 3, 4
    };
    struct foo const bar = {
        .array1 = ARRAY_INIT(arr_init),
        .array2 = ARRAY_INIT(arr_init),
    };
    printf("%d, %d\n", bar.array1[0], bar.array2[3]);
    return (0);
}

The initializer array must appear before what is being initialized in the stack frame. Or it may come from a function parameter.

Of course if your array is much bigger than this, then using a macro like this will get very messy indeed.

share|improve this answer
    
You won't be able to use non-constant elements for initialization, but designated initializer syntax itself isn't restricted by the scope or storage of the target. static struct foo f = {.array1 = {[0]=1,[1]=2,[3]=3,[4]=4}} is perfectly valid. –  tab Nov 22 '13 at 1:51
    
@tab - Yes - you're right - I clarified my answer. –  Digital Trauma Nov 22 '13 at 1:54

Short answer: you can't. C does not copy arrays (without the use of (standard library-)functions). The warnings come from the fact that you cannot assign an array as a whole, even when they are static or constant. When an array is used as an r-value in an assignment it decays to a pointer and thus cannot be assigned to another array (as a whole).

The easiest way to go would be to use memcpy, but obviously that must be inside a function.

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Thanks. I was hoping there was some magic by which I could do it, but if not, memcpy it is. –  Stephen Touset Nov 22 '13 at 0:38
    
Unfortunately so. I've been skimming over the C99 standard to find some hard evidence, but as far as I know there is no way to copy an array using pure C (syntax). –  Kninnug Nov 22 '13 at 0:40
    
@Kninnug It can be done iff the arrays are embedded in compatible structs. However structs can't be initialized by copy outside a function so it's no help in this situation. –  tab Nov 22 '13 at 1:37

While you may not be able to initialize the array by copying from another array, it may be helpful to use a preprocessor macro:

#define ARRAY_INIT {1, 2, 3, 4}

struct foo const bar = {
   .array1 = ARRAY_INIT,
   .array2 = ARRAY_INIT
};
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The array to copy bytes from contains dynamic data. –  Stephen Touset Nov 22 '13 at 0:54
    
Well, you cannot initialize with dynamic data. It must be known at compile time. –  wildplasser Nov 22 '13 at 0:57
    
@wildplasser - I think this is only true if the object in question is static / has global scope - at least that's what seems to work for me. –  Digital Trauma Nov 22 '13 at 1:33

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