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I have a variable that I'd like to use in a function that will be called at a later time. Here's the situation:

var a = 'something';

var mapFun = {
    map: function (doc) {
        if(doc.a === a) {
            emit(doc, doc);
        }
    }
};

So map() is a function that gets called later on in a different context. So a is undefined when the function is called. This makes sense, but I'm wondering how I can access the value of a within the function. For instance:

if(doc.a === a) should be if(doc.a === 'something') when the function is called.

EDIT: I understand the way I've set the example up makes it seem as though a is a global variable. This is not the case. The map() method inside mapFun gets called inside a function which does not have access to a

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1  
What do you mean "a different context?" The way it's written, a is global and should be available at a later time. – jlbruno Nov 22 '13 at 1:43
    
I mean, the object mapFun() gets passed into a function which is outside of this scope. Completely separate. It does not have access to a – Willem Ellis Nov 22 '13 at 1:44
    
This should already work since a is available in the same scope as mapFun – ShawnSauce Nov 22 '13 at 1:44
    
This should work, maybe post the rest of your code. Does this snippet sit inside a function? – NaNpx Nov 22 '13 at 1:45
    
Well if you're passing mapFun into another function, can you pass a as well? – jlbruno Nov 22 '13 at 1:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If a is no longer in scope when this function is called in different context, try making a a global by putting it in the window. Instead of var a = 'something'; do window.a = 'something';

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This works! Not sure if this is the ideal solution, but it works! Thanks – Willem Ellis Nov 22 '13 at 1:57
1  
Putting variables in a global scope so you'll have access to them is an anti pattern. First you'll create too many variables that may be overwritten by other code and second if you have multiple instances that need multiple "a" value you're in trouble and have to write even more complicated code to access them. Either have mapFun or another object remember value of a or pass a closure to the library that calls mapFun.map passing the closure of a. – HMR Nov 22 '13 at 3:22
    
@HMR I agree, it's a little tough to decipher what the OP is ultimately trying to do due to lack of info. This is definitely a hacky solution. Not sure you needed to post this comment 4 times though :) – NaNpx Nov 22 '13 at 4:08
    
If the same wrong answer is given 4 times I'll put the same comment there :-). – HMR Nov 22 '13 at 6:03

Putting variables in global scope so you'll have access to it later is an anti pattern in any language. I'm surprised all 4 answers from JavaScript programmers would suggest to do such a thing.

Let's say you need to pass mapFun.map to someLib.callBack, at the time you pass map you know the value of a therefor you can use a closure:

var a = 22;
someLib.callBack = function(doc){
  mapFun.map(doc,a);
};

It'll look as though someLib would pass "a" but it will only pass "doc". If you have to change the value of "a" later then it depends on the scope. If a is passed around then re assigning it won't change it so you'll need to pass an object that can be mutated.

var someLib = {
  callBack : function(fn){
    setTimeout(function(){
      fn("hello");
    },100);
  }
};
var mapFun = {
  map : function(doc,a){
    console.log("doc passed when called:",doc);
    console.log("variable a is:",a);
  }
};
(function(){
  var a = 22;
  someLib.callBack(function(doc){
    mapFun.map(doc,a);
  });
  a=44;//this is fine, same scope

  a=22;
  someLib.callBack(function(doc){
    mapFun.map(doc,a);
  });
  (function(a){
    a = "not changed";
  }(a));//doesn't change a because you assign it in a different scope

  var obj={};
  obj.a=22;
  someLib.callBack(function(doc){
    mapFun.map(doc,obj.a);
  });
  (function(obj){
    obj.a = "Hello World";
  }(obj));//changed a because you mutated the object
    //diffeerent scope doesn't matter here.
}());

If closures were not an option you could have myMap remember the value of a as suggested by Trendy.

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+1 I was about to write a similar answer, using an object property rather than a string. – Christophe Nov 22 '13 at 7:42
    
@Christophe Thank you, I'm surprised nobody added up scoping the variable "a" to module scope and have the mapFun in an IIFE (function(){var moduleGlobalA, mapFun ={};}()); – HMR Nov 22 '13 at 9:17

Try, instead of doing var a = "something";, try doing window.a = "something"; and then referencing it within your code by doing if(doc.a == window.a).
If that doesn't work, I don't know what will.
Good luck!

share|improve this answer
1  
Putting variables in a global scope so you'll have access to them is an anti pattern. First you'll create too many variables that may be overwritten by other code and second if you have multiple instances that need multiple "a" value you're in trouble and have to write even more complicated code to access them. Either have mapFun or another object remember value of a or pass a closure to the library that calls mapFun.map passing the closure of a. – HMR Nov 22 '13 at 3:23

If you're trying to access a variable defined within another function's scope you'll need to lift the variable from the scope, either by storing it inside the global scope or adding it to the prototype of an object in the global scope (I.E. the object you're trying to pass "a" to).

For instance:

var mapFun = {
    map: function(){
        //do something here
        alert(this.a);
    }
};

mapFun.a = "something";

See how this works: http://jsfiddle.net/z8Uvr/

share|improve this answer
1  
Putting variables in a global scope so you'll have access to them is an anti pattern. First you'll create too many variables that may be overwritten by other code and second if you have multiple instances that need multiple "a" value you're in trouble and have to write even more complicated code to access them. Either have mapFun or another object remember value of a or pass a closure to the library that calls mapFun.map passing the closure of a. +1 for at least adding an alternative. I've added using closures in my answer as well. – HMR Nov 22 '13 at 3:25

Variables a and mapFun are in the same scope, so they should generally always be available for each other.

Even though the .map() function is being called within another function, where the function was declared still has access to a

When you create a new scope, all variables and functions you create in that scope are accessible the functions and objects created in the same scope.

If you are having an issue with accessing a you could make is available to the window (global) object by saying window.a = 'something';

Be careful when adding a to the global scope as it could cause conflict.

Thanks to @HMR for pointing that out

share|improve this answer
1  
Putting variables in a global scope so you'll have access to them is an anti pattern. First you'll create too many variables that may be overwritten by other code and second if you have multiple instances that need multiple "a" value you're in trouble and have to write even more complicated code to access them. Either have mapFun or another object remember value of a or pass a closure to the library that calls mapFun.map passing the closure of a. – HMR Nov 22 '13 at 3:27
    
@HMR +1: For warning of conflict with declaring a to window. Edited answer to state possible issue. – ShawnSauce Nov 22 '13 at 3:40

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