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In main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include "poly.h"

int main (void)
{
  struct poly *p0 = polySetCoefficient (polySetCoefficient (polySetCoefficient (polyCreate() , 0, 4.0), 1, -1.0), 10, 2.0);

  //polyPrint (p0);

  return 0;
}

In poly.c I've just included two functions that I am dealing with, it seems as though polySetCoefficient is the one that's giving me problems. I've commented out the printf statements, but I used those to determine where exactly the program crashes. Apparently, it actually goes through the whole function before it crashes, so I am not exactly sure where the error is coming from. Secondly, in my main.c file I am only calling two functions. Another issue is that everytime I go through polySetCoefficient, my previous entries are replaced with 0s. I think that could be because of the way I set elements in the array to 0, but I carefully made sure to set elements to 0 from the previous size of the array to the new size of the array, excluding the last index.

struct poly *polyCreate()
{

    struct poly *q;

    q = malloc(sizeof(struct poly));
    q->c = malloc(sizeof(double));

        q->c[0] = 0.0;

    q->size = 0;

    //printf("polyCreate: %g\n", q->c[0]);

    return q;
}

struct poly *polySetCoefficient(struct poly *p, int i, double value)
{
    //printf("%d\n", i*sizeof(double));

    if (p->size < i)
    {
        printf("Old: %d, New: %d\n", sizeof(p->c)/sizeof(double), i);

        p->c = realloc(p->c, i+1*sizeof(double));

        printf("New: %d \n", sizeof(p->c));

        for(int l = p->size; l <= i; l++ )
        {

            if(l != i)
            {
                p->c[l] = 0;
                printf("set to 0\n");
            }
            else
            {
                p->c[l] = value;
                printf("F:set to %g\n", p->c[i]);
            }
        }

        printf("Did we come here?\n");

        p->size = i;

    } else {

        p->c[i] = value;

    }

    printf("The %d'th coefficient is %g\n", i, p->c[i]);

    printf("Cof 0: %g, Cof 1: %g, Cof 10: %g", p->c[0], p->c[1], p->c[10]);


    return p;


}

In poly.h

struct poly
{
    double *c;
    int size, length;
};


struct poly *polyCreate();
struct poly *polyDelete(struct poly *p);
struct poly *polySetCoefficient (struct poly *p, int i, double value);
double polyGetCoefficient (struct poly *p, int i);
int polyDegree (struct poly *p);
void polyPrint (struct poly *p);
struct poly *polyCopy (struct poly *p);
struct poly *polyAdd (struct poly *p0, struct poly *p1);
struct poly *polyMultiply (struct poly *p0, struct poly *p1);
struct poly *polyPrime (struct poly *p);
double polyEval (struct poly *p, double x);
share|improve this question
1  
As an aside, you're using realloc incorrectly. If realloc fails then you lose your original pointer, i.e., you leak memory. You need to assign to a temp pointer first. Also, after you create an instance of your struct, you allocate one double for the pointer member. Why do you set size to 0? That's just confusing, it should be 1. –  Ed S. Nov 22 '13 at 4:36
    
Size is basically the index of the array, makes it easier to work with when I have it set to 0. I allocate one double for the pointer member to essentially create an array with one entry which has the value of zero. I don't understand what's exactly wrong in the code, assuming that realloc doesn't fail. –  Maaz Nov 22 '13 at 4:39
    
Ok, but note that size is a very odd name for something that is actually an index. Most people will assume that it means, you know... the "size" of the array. –  Ed S. Nov 22 '13 at 4:55
    
@EdS. yeah I recognized that, but I was too far into the code to change it back, I was going to use length but just left it there for now. –  Maaz Nov 22 '13 at 5:04
    
You don't ever set or reference the length member of struct poly. You also don't list #include <stdlib.h>. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '13 at 5:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This version of the code compiles cleanly and runs plausibly (but not really correctly) without crashing.

One key change is the one identified by immibis in his answer, the corrected size calculation.

The other key change is not printing coefficient 10 when there is no coefficient 10 yet. If you attempt to print that sooner, then you invoke undefined behaviour; anything may happen.

I fixed some printf() formats; on a 64-bit machine, you need to use %zu (or %zd at a pinch) to print a size_t. I removed the unused length member of the structure. I really don't know how to format your single-line multi-call statement neatly. I don't mind slightly longer than 80 character lines, but I don't normally go as far as 120. I definitely prefer the p1 version, not least because it would be possible to error check as you go. At the moment, I've used assert(ptr != 0); where there should be an allocation error check.

Output:

The 0'th coefficient is 4
The 1'th coefficient is -1
Old: 1, New: 10
New: 8
p[1] set to 0
p[2] set to 0
p[3] set to 0
p[4] set to 0
p[5] set to 0
p[6] set to 0
p[7] set to 0
p[8] set to 0
p[9] set to 0
p[10] set to 2
Did we come here?
The 10'th coefficient is 2
Cof 0: 4, Cof 1: 0, Cof 10: 2

Note that you've clobbered the first coefficient with zero when you extended to 10.

Code:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct poly
{
    double *c;
    int size;
};

struct poly *polyCreate(void);
struct poly *polySetCoefficient(struct poly *p, int i, double value);

int main(void)
{
    /* I don't know how to format this neatly! */
    struct poly *p0 = polySetCoefficient(
        polySetCoefficient(
            polySetCoefficient(polyCreate(), 0, 4.0),
            1, -1.0),
        10, 2.0);

    assert(p0 != 0);

    /*
    struct poly *p1 = polyCreate();
    p1 = polySetCoefficient(p1, 0,  4.0),
    p1 = polySetCoefficient(p1, 1, -1.0);
    p1 = polySetCoefficient(p1, 10, 2.0);
    */

    return 0;
}

struct poly *polyCreate(void)
{
    struct poly *q = malloc(sizeof(struct poly));
    assert(q != 0);
    q->c = malloc(sizeof(double));
    assert(q->c != 0);

    q->c[0] = 0.0;
    q->size = 1;

    return q;
}

struct poly *polySetCoefficient(struct poly *p, int i, double value)
{
    assert(p != 0);

    if (p->size < i)
    {
        printf("Old: %zu, New: %d\n", sizeof(p->c)/sizeof(double), i);

        p->c = realloc(p->c, (i+1)*sizeof(double));
        assert(p->c != 0);

        printf("New: %zu\n", sizeof(p->c));

        for (int l = p->size; l <= i; l++)
        {
            if (l != i)
            {
                p->c[l] = 0;
                printf("p[%d] set to 0\n", l);
            }
            else
            {
                p->c[l] = value;
                printf("p[%d] set to %g\n", i, p->c[i]);
            }
        }

        printf("Did we come here?\n");

        p->size = i;
    }
    else
    {
        p->c[i] = value;
    }

    printf("The %d'th coefficient is %g\n", i, p->c[i]);

    if (i >= 10)
        printf("Cof 0: %g, Cof 1: %g, Cof 10: %g", p->c[0], p->c[1], p->c[10]);

    return p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The setting to zero is fixed by making the for loop initialize the control variable to p->size+1 so it doesn't set the element at p->size to 0. –  Maaz Nov 22 '13 at 5:45

The missing brackets here could be the problem:

p->c = realloc(p->c, i+1*sizeof(double));

Change it to:

p->c = realloc(p->c, (i+1)*sizeof(double));
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, that was dumb of me. That seems to fix the error, however, the issue is when I repeatedly call this function, like it's done in the main.c file it resets the values of the previously assigned array elements. For example: 1st iteration would for example set the 1st element to 4, then the second iteration would set the 3rd element to 2, but then the first element no longer has 4 as it's value, instead it has 0. –  Maaz Nov 22 '13 at 5:02

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