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I want to manipulate a javascript array in PHP. Is it possible to do something like this?

$.ajax({        
       type: "POST",
       url: "tourFinderFunctions.php",
       data: "activitiesArray="+activities,
       success: function() {
            $("#lengthQuestion").fadeOut('slow');        
       }
    }); 

Activities is a single dimensional array like:

var activities = ['Location Zero', 'Location One', 'Location Two'];

The script does not complete when I try this.. Any Ideas or reading materials that will help me accomplish this?

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possible duplicate of Pass a PHP string to a Javascript variable (and escape newlines) –  Anthon Mar 26 '13 at 5:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 66 down vote accepted
   data: { activitiesArray : activities },

that's it! now you can access it in PHP:

   <? $myArray = $_REQUEST['activitiesArray']; ?>
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2  
Why was this answer so hard to find!? Thank you, this is exactly what I needed. –  Vian Esterhuizen May 8 '12 at 23:43

You'll want to encode your array as JSON before sending it, or you'll just get some junk on the other end.

Since all you're sending is the array, you can just do:

data: { activities: activities }

which will automatically convert the array for you.

See here for details.

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You need to turn this into a string. You can do this using the stringify method in the JSON2 library.

http://www.json.org/

http://www.json.org/js.html

The code would look something like:

var myJSONText = JSON.stringify(myObject);

So

['Location Zero', 'Location One', 'Location Two'];

Will become:

"['Location Zero', 'Location One', 'Location Two']"

You'll have to refer to a PHP guru on how to handle this on the server. I think other answers here intimate a solution.

Data can be returned from the server in a similar way. I.e. you can turn it back into an object.

var myObject = JSON.parse(myJSONString);
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Tough half, This was indeed a good answer :) –  atjoshi Jun 25 at 17:24

I know it may be too late to answer this, but this worked for me in a great way:

  1. Stringify your javascript object (json) with var st = JSON.stringify(your_object);

  2. Pass your POST data as "string" (maybe using jQuery: $.post('foo.php',{data:st},function(data){... });

  3. Decode your data on the server-side processing: $data = json_decode($_POST['data']);

That's it... you can freely use your data.

Multi-dimensional arrays and single arrays are handled as normal arrays. To access them just do the normal $foo[4].

Associative arrays (javsacript objects) are handled as php objects (classes). To access them just do it like classes: $foo->bar.

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Use the JQuery Serialize function

http://docs.jquery.com/Ajax/serialize

Serialize is typically used to prepare user input data to be posted to a server. The serialized data is in a standard format that is compatible with almost all server side programming languages and frameworks.

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This worked for me:

$.ajax(
          {
          url:"../messaging/delete.php",
                     type:"POST",
                     data:{messages:selected},
                     success:function(data){
                         if(data === "done")
                         {

                         }
                         info($("#notification"), data);
                     },
                     beforeSend:function(){
                         info($("#notification"),"Deleting "+count+" messages");
                     },
                    error:function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorMessage)
                   {
                      error($("#notification"),errorMessage);
                    } 


                    });

And this for your PHP:

$messages = $_POST['messages']
foreach($messages as $msg)
{
    echo $msg;
}
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