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Since variables declared inside a method are available only within that method, and variables declared private within a class are only available within a class. What is the purpose of the this key word? Why would I want to have the following:

private static class SomeClass : ISomeClass
{
    private string variablename;
    private void SomeMethod(string toConcat)
    {
        this.variablename = toConcat+toConcat;
        return this.variablename;
    }
}

When this will do the exact same thing:

private static class SomeClass : ISomeClass
{
    private string variablename;
    private void SomeMethod(string toConcat)
    {
        variablename = toConcat+toConcat;
        return variablename;
    }
}

to practice my typing skills?

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6  
this keyword is to the instance of the class, it will do the exact same thing. People maybe prefer this.variablename over variablename for readability. –  Anthony Forloney Jan 6 '10 at 15:15
5  
Small note: I don't think you want to be returning anything from a method marked as void... –  Sarah Vessels Jan 6 '10 at 16:04
1  
In a struct, this can actually be assigned to, which is pretty cool. I would build a big answer around this, but the question is about classes. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Jan 6 '10 at 16:58
    
you also cant have instance level methods in a 'static' class, i also dnt think a static class can inherit another class... –  Kurru Jan 7 '10 at 9:04
    
ok . . . so I appreciate people critiqing the crappy example I whipped up . . . . ;) –  andrewWinn Jan 7 '10 at 13:06

19 Answers 19

up vote 32 down vote accepted

There are a couple of cases where it matters:

  • If you have a function parameter and a member variable with the same names, you need to be able to distinguish them:

    class Foo {
      public Foo(int i) { this.i = i; }
    
    
      private int i;
    }
    
  • If you actually need to reference the current object, rather than one of its members. Perhaps you need to pass it to another function:

    class Foo {
      public static DoSomething(Bar b) {...}
    }
    
    
    class Bar {
      public Bar() { Foo.DoSomething(this); }
    }
    

    Of course the same applies if you want to return a reference to the current object

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5  
Third place where you need it: to chain to another constructor in the same class. –  Jon Skeet Jan 6 '10 at 15:28
2  
Fourth example: To call extension methods on yourself. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 15:35
3  
@Jon: True, although I consider that a bit of a special case. They could have easily used a unique keyword there, since it's not really acting as just a reference to the current object in that case. It has special semantics. –  jalf Jan 6 '10 at 15:36
1  
The case of a method parameter having the same name as a member variable just seems like bad design. –  Sarah Vessels Jan 6 '10 at 16:07
2  
@Sarah: take a Person class as example. Why should the ctor name parameter be named differently from the name field, if that's what it is, the name? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 16:10

In your example it is purely a matter of taste, but here is a case where it is not:

private string SomeMethod(string variablename)
{
    this.variablename = variablename;
    return this.variablename;
}

Without this, the code would work differently, assigning the parameter to itself.

share|improve this answer
6  
It's still a matter of taste. Some programmers name instance fields with an underscore prefix and need not to use this. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 15:17
8  
It is a matter of taste but, as you point out, having a particular preference can lead to subtle, hard to detect bugs. My preference is to always use this for instance variables. –  tvanfosson Jan 6 '10 at 15:18
5  
@Martinho Fernandes - except when you make a mistake and don't follow the arbitrary guideline, then you're really confused. Much better to use the language feature than an arbitrary naming mechanism to tell the difference IMO. –  tvanfosson Jan 6 '10 at 15:19
1  
@tvanfosson: Agree, but unfortunately I'm not able to convince the underscore-prefix-camp... It's another holy war. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 15:24
1  
Doesn't matter if it's arbitrary as long as it's consistent. Since the compiler won't tell you if you're wrong either way, they're both effectively just conventions in this specific context. Personally I use underscore and it seems to be very widespread within the C# community. I find it easy to 'read over' the '_' while still noticing it's there compared to 'this.', which just bothers me. Horses for courses, as they say... –  Neil Hewitt Jan 6 '10 at 15:26

There are many cases where this is useful. Here's one example:

class Logger { 
   static public void OutputLog (object someObj) {
      ...
   }
}

class SomeClass { 
   private void SomeMethod () { 
      Logger.OutputLog (this);
   } 
}

Here's another example. Suppose I were writing a Stream.Out method that outputs an object, and returns a reference to the stream itself, like so:

class Stream {
   public Stream Out (object obj) { 
      ... code to output obj ...
      return this; 
   }
}

Then, one could use this Out call in a chained mode:

Stream S = new Stream (...);
S.Out (A). Out (B). Out (C);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - you often need to use "this" in a method where you want to pass yourself to some other object. –  Eric Petroelje Jan 6 '10 at 15:20
    
@Eric: Exactly, good summary. Also, as in the second example I've provided above, when you want to return yourself from a method. –  Tarydon Jan 6 '10 at 15:23

In addition to the "field disambiguation" and "passing a reference of the current isntance" answers (already given), there is an additional scenario where this is necessary; to call extension methods on the current instance (I'm ignoring the usage of this in declaring an extension method, as that isn't quite the same meaning as the question):

class Foo
{
    public void Bar()
    {
        this.ExtnMethod(); // fine
        ExtnMethod(); // compile error
    }
}
static class FooExt
{
    public static void ExtnMethod(this Foo foo) {}
}

To be fair, this isn't a common scenario. A more likely one is simply to make code more readable, for example:

public bool Equals(Foo other) {
    return other != null && this.X == other.X && this.Y == other.Y;
}

In the above (or similarly for Compare, Clone etc), without the this. I find it a little... "unbalanced".

share|improve this answer
    
I "had" to use this when the base class had extension methods to provide a simpler interface for some operations. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 17:08
    
And this is actually a special case of the "pass a reference to yourself" case, except that it is (syntax) sugar-coated. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 17:20

In most cases, using this simply clutters the code. However, I've seen it used by other programmers, presumably to trigger the intellisense for members of the local class.

The this keyword is also required for use in extension methods.

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static int WordCount(this String str)
    {
        return str.Split(new char[] { ' ', '.', '?' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Length;
    }
}  
share|improve this answer

Firstly, your examples are flawed because you've marked the class as static, so it cannot be instantiated.

Regardless, this is simply a reference to the current instance. It can be used to resolve conflicts between local variables and member variables, for example:

public class Foo
{
    private string baz;

    public void Bar(string baz)
    {
        this.baz = baz;
    }
}

It can also be used simply as an object in its own right, for example:

public class Foo
{
    public List<Foo> GetList(string baz)
    {
        var list = new List<Foo>();
        list.Add(this);

        return list;
    }
}

(Not that this example is particularly useful, but you get the idea.)

Edit: A more realistic example is the event model in .NET:

public class Foo
{
    public EventHandler SomeEvent;

    public void Bar()
    {
        if (SomeEvent != null)
        {
            SomeEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
again . . . thanks for critiqing a crappy example I whipped up with note pad . . . ;) –  andrewWinn Jan 7 '10 at 13:09

You need this if your method-parameter has the same name as the field.

private string variablename;
private void SomeMethod(string variablename)
{
    this.variablename = variablename+variablename;
    return this.variablename;
}
share|improve this answer

The first thing that comes into my mind is readability and/or personal preference.

Sometimes when I am working with a rather large class... or a class with a base class (where I cannot "see" some variables)... I utilize the "this" keyword... at minimum for intellisense in Visual Studio.

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Outside of perhaps Javascript, "this" is mostly a placeholder keyword and it is most useful is making your intent obvious when writing a piece of code.

Basically it will help with readability.

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  1. this signifies your current class instance member not
    a. your base class member
    b. scope member
    c. static member
  2. To make your code more readable.
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First and foremost, this is necessary when a class method needs to pass a reference to the object to some method in another class.

For example:

class Image
{
    void Refresh()
    {
        Screen.DrawImage(this);
    }
}

Unlike some other scenarios where using or not using "this." is a matter of style, or a means for resolving an artificial ambiguity.

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I respectfully disagree with some of the other posters. In C#, it isn't just a matter of taste; it is also in line with Microsoft's C# style guidelines (both internally and externally, though they do not seem to ahdere to their own guidelines internally).

There are examples of cases when the notation you used will not work:

private void DoSomething(object input) 
{ 
    input = input; 
} 

Instead, you would need to use the following notation:

private void DoSomething(object input) 
{ 
    this.input = input; 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
There is a reason these are guidelines and not a rule of law that is punishable by death. There are many guidelines that may not be of use. (See the debate of tagging interfaces versus meta attributes) stackoverflow.com/questions/983037/… –  Matthew Whited Jan 6 '10 at 15:34
    
Style guidelines are a matter of taste. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 15:38
    
I don't disagree that style guidelines are subjective, but what you're saying is tantamount to, "Capitalizing book titles is a matter of taste." It isn't, in fact, a matter of "taste." It's a matter of accepted standards for styling text. –  Ed Altorfer Jan 6 '10 at 15:51
    
The Microsoft style guidelines are not accepted standards (I do follow them, mind you). The discussion generated in Thomas' question, the different styles of code you find in samples around the web, and in open-source projects are proof of that. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 6 '10 at 17:02
    
I agree that there are other, competing standards, just like there are in English for style. However, and this is my opinion only, since Microsoft developed the language and the style guide, I would argue that they should be considered the authoritative source unless your project has a compelling reason to break from their standard. –  Ed Altorfer Jan 6 '10 at 17:28

this refers to the instance of the class, and in the example you show us: you use this to refer to the field called variablename.

If you had a local variable or parameter with the same name, you would need to have a way of differentiating between them. In that case this will refer to the field, while not prefixing with this refers to the local variable or parameter.

You should have a naming convention that helps you differ between fields and locals. This will save you from the troubles that could occur if you later added a local with the same name to your method. (Since code without this would then break...)

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Common use is with constructor arguments that have the same name:

public SomeClass(string variablename)
{
   this.variablename = variablename;
}
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It is a style issue primarily. If your method has a variable name that's the same as a private class member, using this helps disambiguate. This could potentially prevent silly bugs.

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1) First, and the most important, is a situation when an object needs to pass a reference to itself:

public class Element{
//...
public Element Parent;
public Element Root()
{
 if( Parent == null )
  return this;
 return Parent.Root();
}
}
public void OnEvent()
{
 Event(this, new EventArgs());
}

In fluent interface:

public class Query{ public Query Add(Parameter parameter) { _list.Add(parameter); return this; } }

2) Second, in and extension method:

public class Extension
{
 public Element Root(this Element element) {
  if( element.Parent == null )
   return element;
  return element.Parent.Root();
 }
}

3) Third, and you really don't need it, to distinguish parameters from class members. You don't need it, because a good coding convention saves you from using 'this' keyword.

public class Element
{
 public Element Parent;
 publlc void SetParent(Element parent)
 {
   // this.Parent = parent; // see, you don't need it
   Parent = parent;
 }
}
//...
public class Element
{
 public Element _parent;
 public Element Parent { get { return _parent; } }
 publlc void SetParent(Element parent)
 {
   // this._parent = parent; // see, you don't need it
   _parent = parent;
 }
}
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There is one principle that should guide you in deciding whether or not to use 'this'. Do you need to refer specifically to THIS instance of the class? If you do, then use 'this'. Otherwise, leave it out.

The Logger example another poster provided is a good example of this. He could not rely on an implicit this, since he needed the object itself.

There is no point on using 'this' as a prefix to a method of the class itself, in the class itself, since it is implicit.

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I can't help but...

if (this == null)
    throw new NullReferenceException();

[KIDDDIIIING!!!]

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Another scenario I'v already found:

private int value;
public int Value
{
    get { return this.value; }
    set { this.value = value; } //without this it doesn't make sense
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this won't work, cause you named the backing field _value and not value. –  Oliver Jun 1 '11 at 10:49
    
@Oliver, yap +1 for you, fixed by me. –  Dariusz Jun 1 '11 at 11:40

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