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I'm starting to develop an Oracle operator with pl/sql. There are some examples in the guide but now I stick on something.

In all examples that I have seen, it's always like this :

CREATE OPERATOR Contains 
   BINDING (VARCHAR2, VARCHAR2) 
    RETURN NUMBER 
     USING text.contains;

and we use it like this in WHERE clause :

SELECT * 
  FROM MyEmployees 
 WHERE Contains(resume, 'Oracle') = 1;

Is it possible to create an operator, which is used like =, +, ... with a left and a right side ?

In this case like :

SELECT * 
  FROM MyEmployees 
 WHERE resume Contains 'Oracle'

Thanks for your help.

EDIT : I know it's possible with PostgreSQL, but didn't find for Oracle
http://www.postgresql.org/docs/current/static/sql-createoperator.html

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That would usually be referred to as an infix operator. I'm not familiar with Oracle so can't give an answer; But most languages I've encountered don't allow you to define new infix operators (usually they have to be handled carefully by the parser). –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 22 '13 at 8:44
1  
@Damien_The_Unbeliever: Postgres allows that ;) (And I think C++ as well) –  a_horse_with_no_name Nov 23 '13 at 18:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Excerpt from your comment to @ajmalmhd04 answer

i really want to use my operator like built-in (=, + ...)

Yes, documentation is quite confusing in a way it defines user-defined operators, especially this part:

user-defined operators act like the built-in operators such as <, >, and =;

Unfortunately, it means that you can use user-defined operators where(mostly) you can use built-in operators but not in the same way(operand1 OPERATOR operand2 for instance) you use built-in operators, like < or =. User-defined operators, if not look at them very very closely, are different way of calling functions with the exception that they(operators) can only be used in DML statements (select, insert and so forth). You won't be able to use them in PL/SQL directly, only through DML. So, something like this, in PL/SQL will result in PLS-00548: invalid use of operator.

if operator(<<arguments>>) = 1 then
  -- something
end if;

The benefits of creating and using operators, if you are not involved in developing application specific server-based extensions (data cartridges), indextypes for instance, not that visible to me personally. Cannot think of a situation where you can use operators and cannot use functions. Opposite is not true, however. You may look at operator's ability to have multiple bindings as a way of using it as overloaded function. But, on the other hand, you can easily achieve the same with packages.

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1)create a TYPE:

CREATE OR REPLACE  TYPE number_type IS TABLE OF NUMBER;

2) create a function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION near_to_num_f(A number) RETURN number_type AS
l_num number_type;
BEGIN
SELECT num
BULK COLLECT INTO l_num
FROM tab1 WHERE num + 15 >= a AND num -15 <= a;
RETURN l_num;
END;

3) create the operator:

CREATE OR REPLACE OPERATOR near_to
   BINDING (number) 
   RETURN number_type
   USING near_to_num_f; 

4) Create sample table and insert some data:

 CREATE TABLE tab1 (num NUMBER);
INSERT INTO tab1 VALUES( 90);
INSERT INTO tab1 VALUES( 95);
insert into tab1 values( 120);

5) Query using:

SELECT * 
FROM tab1 
WHERE  num IN(select * from TABLE(near_to(100)));

6) Output:

 NUM
----------
  90 
  95 

Read More

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Thanks for your help, but the problem is the same i really want to use my operator like built-in (=, + ...). An arg leftside (the column) and rightside the value. –  milcaepsilon Nov 22 '13 at 15:14
1  
if you want to use as a built-in... I am not sure if it is possible, but you can try a wrapper to overcome typing braces –  realspirituals Nov 22 '13 at 15:57

Yes. you can use "Like" operator.

For Ex :

SELECT * FROM MyEmployees WHERE resume like '%Oracle%'

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Thanks but I want to use it with a special function. Something like that (with number) "price nearto 1234" and for example this return all price "nearto" 1234 which is defined by a function –  milcaepsilon Nov 22 '13 at 8:43

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