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Every now and then I come across code like this:

foo = Foo()
...
if foo.bar is not None and foo.bar.baz == 42:
   shiny_happy(...)

Which seems, well, unpythonic, to me.

In Objective-C, you can send messages to nil and get nil as the answer. I've always thought that's quite handy. Of course it is possible to implement a Null pattern in Python, however judging from the results Google's given me, it seems this is not very widely used. Why's that?

Or even better—would it be a bad idea to let None.whatever return None instead of raising an exception?

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1  
I'm not very experienced in Python but I think foo = Foo() in case of error should not return null, but raise an exception –  Valentin Golev Jan 6 '10 at 15:46
    
Did you mean and foo.baz.bar ? –  Skilldrick Jan 6 '10 at 15:46
    
Yup, sorry and thanks. Fixed. –  Tomas Brambora Jan 6 '10 at 16:00
9  
If even JavaScript considers it an error, it probably should be an error. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 6 '10 at 16:35
3  
As someone who develops in both Python and Objective-C, I must say that the ability to send messages to nil is a handy piece of syntactic sugar, and one of the few ObjC idioms I miss in Python. –  Jarret Hardie Jan 7 '10 at 0:48
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11 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

PEP 336 - Make None Callable might answer your question. The reason for why it was rejected was simply "It is considered a feature that None raises an error when called."

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2  
The general python philosophy is found by import this. Specifically: "In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess." Python also goes out of it's way to make sure that None is returned if no explicit return statement is found. The implementation would have made it easy to return the last thing on the stack, like lisp, or the first argument to the callable, like smalltalk. –  Shane Holloway Jan 6 '10 at 17:38
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Couldn't you do a try except? The Pythonic way says It is Easier to Ask for Forgiveness than Permission.

So:

try:
    if foo.bar.baz == 42:
        shiny_happy(...)
except AttributeError:
    pass #or whatever

Or do it without possibly silencing more exceptions than desired:

try:
    baz = foo.bar.baz
except AttributeError:
    pass # handle error as desired
else:
    if baz == 42:
        shiny_happy(...)
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2  
The python way has always been and should always be to try and catch in place of explicitly checking for errors. If you assume that stuff works, it will run faster when it actually does. When it doesn't work, then it's ok that things take a little longer because it should be the exception to the rule. –  Tor Valamo Jan 6 '10 at 16:33
1  
Squelching AttributeError like that is a terrible idea. This is much worse than the original code. What if shiny_happy, or code called from it, has a bug? –  Jason Orendorff Jan 6 '10 at 17:22
4  
@Skilldrick: you miss my point. What if foo doesn't have an attribute bar at all. What if it has a bar, but that bar doesn't have a .baz attribute? Worse yet what if shiny_happy() raise an AttributeError? You are catching (and ignoring) multiple possible errors unintentionally. That is just BAD programming. BAD because you don't say to the reader of the code how many of those error conditions you actually mean to ignore, and BAD because you do ignore them all, which may or may not be the correct thing to do. This code is indefensible, and it saddens me that it got so many upvotes. –  Eloff Jan 6 '10 at 17:42
2  
Sigh. This can still mask bugs. Suppose .bar or .baz has a getter. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 6 '10 at 18:18
1  
Jason: The essence of programming is in tradeoffs, and the example code in the question is abstract, so it's difficult to pin down requirements for it because it doesn't have any. This answer is one way to approach those tradeoffs, but of course you can never have a perfect solution, because There Is No Silver Bullet(tm). You've gone from saying "hiding errors in shiny_happy is a problem" to describing a concrete implementation issue that is both more easily detectable in other ways (such as unit tests for Foo) and much less common. That's essentially a different complaint. –  Roger Pate Jan 6 '10 at 18:25
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I'm sorry, but that code is pythonic. I think most would agree that "explicit is better than implicit" in Python. Python is a language that is easy to read compared to most, and people should not defeat that by writing cryptic code. Make the meaning very clear.

foo = Foo()
...
if foo.bar is not None and foo.bar.baz == 42:
    shiny_happy(...)

In this code sample, it is clear that foo.bar is sometimes None on this code path, and that we only run shiny_happy() if it is not None, and .baz == 42. Very clear to anyone what is going on here and why. The same can not be said for the null pattern, or the try ... except code in one of the answers posted here. It's one thing if your language, like Objective-C or javascript enforces a null pattern, but in a language where it is not used at all, it will just create confusion and code that is difficult to read. When programming in python, do as the pythonistas do.

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The handiness comes at the expense of dumb mistakes not being detected at the earliest possible time, as close to the buggy line of code as possible.

I think the handiness of this particular feature would be occasional at best, whereas dumb mistakes happen all the time.


Certainly a SQL-like NULL would be bad for testing, which really banks on propositions being either true or false. Consider this code, from unittest.py:

class TestCase:
    ...
    def failUnless(self, expr, msg=None):
        """Fail the test unless the expression is true."""
        if not expr: raise self.failureException, msg

Now suppose I have a test that does this:

conn = connect(addr)
self.failUnless(conn.isOpen())

Suppose connect erroneously returns null. If I'm using the "null pattern", or the language has it built-in, and conn is null, then conn.isOpen() is null, and not conn.isOpen() is null too, so the assertion passes, even though the connection clearly is not open.

I tend to think NULL is one of SQL's worst features. And the fact that null silently passes for an object of any type in other languages is not much better. (Tony Hoare called null references “my billion-dollar mistake”.) We need less of that sort of thing, not more.

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As others have said, PEP 336 describes why this is the behavior.

Adding something like Groovy's "safe navigation operator" (?.) could perhaps make things more elegant in some cases:

foo = Foo()

if foo.bar?.baz == 42:
    ...
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I don't think it's a good idea. Here's why. suppose you have

foo.getValue()

Suppose getValue() returns a number, or None if not found. Now suppose foo was none by accident or a bug. As a result, it would return None, and continue, even if there's a bug.

In other words, you are no longer able to distinguish if there's no value (returns None) or if there's an error (foo was None to begin with). You are altering the return contract of a routine with a fact that is not under control of the routine itself, eventually overwriting its semantics.

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Hmm... Not a bad point. But I think that's just a question of how you define the afformentioned contract. Either it could be "throw an exception" or "return Null". –  Tomas Brambora Jan 6 '10 at 16:14
    
@Tomas Brambora: Correct. And almost everything is defined as "throw an exception" so that they can return meaningful None's. Since we have a choice, we prefer to reserve None to be distinct from exceptional behavior. –  S.Lott Jan 6 '10 at 18:11
    
None is not exceptional in this case. Why would it be ? if there's no value, it's not an exceptional situation, you just have no value, and returning None is the correct behavior. –  Stefano Borini Jan 7 '10 at 3:31
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Here's why I don't think that's a good idea:

foo = Foo() // now foo is None

// if foo is None, I want to raise an exception because that is an error condition.
// The normal case is that I expect a foo back whose bar property may or may not be filled in.
// If it's not filled in, I want to set it myself.

if not foo.bar // Evaluates to true because None.bar is None under your paradigm, I think
  foo.bar = 42 // Now what?

How would you handle this case?

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In that case Null should probably raise an exception. I'm not saying you should be able to set Null attributes, just be able to return Null when comparing (i.e., getting the attribute value). –  Tomas Brambora Jan 6 '10 at 15:59
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While I wholeheartedly agree with other answers here that say that it's a good thing that None raises an exception when asked for a member, this is a little pattern I sometimes use:

getattr(foo.bar, 'baz', default_value)
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Personally I believe throwing an exception is what should happen. Lets say for some reason you are writing software for missiles in Python. Imagine the atomic bomb and lets say there was a method called explode(timeToExplode) and timeToExplode got passed in as None. I think you would be unhappy at the end of the day when you lost the war, because you didn't find this in testing.

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3  
Interesting. The only winning move is not to play. –  balpha Jan 6 '10 at 15:57
    
Well, I don't really get your point. Would you be happier if you've passed None rather than Null? Somewhere you have to test for null-ness or none-ness anyway. –  Tomas Brambora Jan 6 '10 at 16:16
1  
I would be more happy if you properly handled nulls in the manner in which the language specifies. But hey that's just me and my quirkiness. –  Woot4Moo Jan 6 '10 at 16:20
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I am not a python programmer (just starting to learn the language) but this seems like the never-ending discussion on when to return error or throw exception, and the fact is that (of course this is only an opinion) it depends.

Exceptions should be used for exceptional conditions, and as such move the checks for rare situations outside of the main block of code. They should not be used when a not-found value is a common condition (think of requesting the left child of a tree, in many cases --all leaves-- it will be null). There is yet again a third situation with functions that return sets of values, where you might just want to return a valid empty set to ease the code.

I believe that following the above advice, code is much more legible. When the situation is rare you do not need to worry about null (an exception will be called) so less used code is moved out of the main block.

When null is a valid return value, processing it is within the main flow of control, but that is good, as it is a common situation and as such part of the main algorithm (do not follow a null edge in a graph).

In the third case, when requesting values from a function that can possibly return no values, returning an empty set simplifies the code: you can assume that the returned container exists and process all found elements without adding the extra checks in the code.

Then again, that is just an opinion, but being mine I tend to follow it :)

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I can't see why an exception should be rare. An exception should be raised if there is an error, which can be very frequent depending the situation and the context. Of course, usually errors are exceptional, but some times that's not the case. To me, the most pythonic way will be raising an error in Foo() if it doesn't return a correct value... –  Khelben Jan 6 '10 at 18:03
    
Exceptions are meant (at least in most languages I know, of which python is not one yet) to deal with exceptional situations. In most cases there is a cost associated with the use of exceptions as compared to checking return values. The use of exception not only has a cost, but breaks the flow of execution of the function making it harder to read, or (if each function call is wrapped in a try) adds quite a lot of error control code intermixed with the algorithm, again difficulting the reading. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 6 '10 at 18:40
    
The point there is whether null (None) is an expected result of the function or else an error. If it is an error, then an exception should be thrown, but if it is expected (requesting the left child in a tree node is expected to yield null in many cases) then exceptions should not be used. In the case of retrieving data, while requesting an element from a database by primary key (with a key that was previously obtained) failing to get the element is an error, and as such should be an exception. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 6 '10 at 18:45
    
On the other hand, finding no items when searching for a given property from an inventory (say all green cars in stock in an autodealer) is not an error but rather a valid result: there are no green cars now. That condition should not trigger an exception, but rather return an empty set --which is a valid result semantically. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 6 '10 at 18:47
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foo = Foo()
...
if foo.bar is not None and foo.bar.baz == 42:
   shiny_happy(...)

The above can be cleaned up using the fact that None resolves to False:

if foo.bar and foo.bar.baz == 42:
    shiny_happy(...)
else:
    not_happy(...)
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2  
Except it's not the same. If foo.bar happens to be an empty list or 0, you've got trouble. –  James Hopkin Jan 6 '10 at 16:42
    
It really is counter-intuitive for None to be called upon and return anything. After all None is nothing, so why would you be able to do anything with it? The "elegance" lost should only be due to the fact that bar is not guaranteed to be something. –  manifest Jan 6 '10 at 16:48
    
In the question example, foo very obviously is not a list or a number, it is an object. If it were a list or a number, than yes, this would have to be treated differently. –  manifest Jan 6 '10 at 16:52
    
@James, if foo.bar is an empty list or 0, then foo.bar.baz will fail anyway, so we won't be happy.. –  poke Jan 6 '10 at 17:45
    
It's quite possible that foo.bar is a container object that has a baz attribute or property. It will evaluate as False depending on the __nonzero__ special method or just on len(foo.bar) being zero. As James says, the if foo.bar shortcut is not safe in general. –  Scott Griffiths Jan 6 '10 at 18:25
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