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NODE.JS CODE (DOES NOT WORK AS EXPECTED)

var crypto = require('crypto');

var input = '200904281000001|DOM|IND|INR|10|orderno_unique1|others|http://localhost/sample/Success.php|http://localhost/sample/failure.php|TOML';

var Key = "qcAHa6tt8s0l5NN7UWPVAQ==";
Key =  new Buffer(Key || '', 'base64');
var cipher = crypto.createCipher('aes128', Key);

var actual = cipher.update(input, "utf8", "base64");
actual += cipher.final("base64");
console.log(actual);

Actual Output

bIK4D0hv2jcKP3eikoaM7ddqRee+RrT2FDOZA+c2sldyrqP+NrmgYOEXklUrSBQiU7w7e90nzFl/mpidy/Q8FD692bFLnESiNqGEQ7er44BXxFtNo6AKvpuohz31zm9JupJXL3jhOC+47mvDHokR4b9euDzPFitTJQW55JuSyvJphOKdiXjH+lGKxXKWsODq

Expected Output

ncJ+HX6zIdrUfEedi7YC82QOUARkySblivzysFbMqaYEMPj7UfMlE4SEkDcjg+D9dE5StGJgebSOkL7UuR6fXwodcgL0CSRds0Y+hX27gKUZK45b7Tc0EjXhepwHJ/olSdWUCkwRcZcv+wxtYzOH7+KKijJabJkU1/SF1ugExzcnqfV2wOZ9q79a4y/g3cb5

PHP CODE (WORKS AS EXPECTED)

include('CryptAES.php');

//Testing key
$Key = "qcAHa6tt8s0l5NN7UWPVAQ==";

//requestparam Testing - TOML 
$input  ="200904281000001|DOM|IND|INR|10|unique_10005|others|http://www.yourdomain.com/paymentSuccess.php|http://www.yourdomain.com/paymentFailure.php|TOML";

$aes = new CryptAES();
$aes->set_key(base64_decode($key));
$aes->require_pkcs5();

echo $aes->encrypt($input);
share|improve this question
1  
How to get CryptAES.php ? –  user568109 Nov 22 '13 at 12:01
1  
Note that you are using AES wrong, you must use an initialization vector. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 22 '13 at 13:02

2 Answers 2

There is a known issue with using PHP's inbuilt mcrypt library. It pads the key in a different manner as node.js. This issue was bugging me a lot a few months ago, and there is a workaround here. What I did was use a small php command line script with my node.js app to handle encryption and decryption.

share|improve this answer
    
We are integrating with a Payment Gateway and the encoded string is provided by that. They are using the same code with multiple clients (JAVA, PHP etc.) so it's definitely not a PHP only issue. –  Rajiv Nov 23 '13 at 6:04

First of all, your two input strings are different. On Node.js, you are using

200904281000001|DOM|IND|INR|10|orderno_unique1|others|
http://localhost/sample/Success.php|
http://localhost/sample/failure.php|TOML

whereas on PHP it's:

200904281000001|DOM|IND|INR|10|unique_10005|others|
http://www.yourdomain.com/paymentSuccess.php|
http://www.yourdomain.com/paymentFailure.php|TOML

They differ in the domain as well as the second-last string in the first line. Then, you do not explain where your CryptAES function in PHP comes from. As you do not specify any parameters, one can only guess that it's AES with 128 bits. What are its defaults? What kind of padding is used? CBC mode or EBC mode? …?

Questions over questions one can not answer for now.

For testing, I wrote a small Node.js script that takes both of your input strings, and tries all ciphers available in Node.js (you can get them using crypto.getCiphers()) combined with all possible encodings Node.js supports (i.e., utf8, ascii, utf16le and ucs2). None of them resulted in the string you gave as expected.

So, although this is not a real answer, I hope that this helps you anyway, at least a little step into the right direction.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Golo. We had also tried all the ciphers in a loop before giving up. No cipher gave the result that we were expecting. –  Rajiv Dec 2 '13 at 5:24

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