Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code

foreach (var rssItem in rss.Channel.Items)
{
    // ...
}

But only want 6 items not all items, how can I do it in C#?

share|improve this question
4  
Which 6? Any 6? First 6? Random 6? The 6 that satisfy a certain criterion? –  Mark Byers Jan 6 '10 at 16:27
2  
What version of .NET? –  Mark Byers Jan 6 '10 at 16:27
2  
If var is in the sample code in the question, it's C# 3.0+ –  p.campbell Jan 6 '10 at 16:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 33 down vote accepted

just iterate over the top 6 from the collection:

foreach(var rssItem in rss.Channel.Items.Take(6))
share|improve this answer
5  
When you say "too slow", are you referring to the time it takes to iterate over the collection or too slow to post the answer ? –  Scott Davies Jan 6 '10 at 16:28

Not to be too obvious but...

int max = Math.Min(6, rss.Channel.Items.Count);
for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
{
   var rssItem = rss.Channel.Items[i];
   //...
}

I know it's old school, and not filled with all sorts of Extension method goodness, but sometimes the old school still works... especially if you're still using .NET 2.0.

share|improve this answer
2  
What if the sequence doesn't have an indexer? Suppose it is an infinite sequence of randomly-generated numbers, for example. –  Eric Lippert Jan 6 '10 at 17:04
    
It'll still work for a list or array, which rss.Channel.Items probably is. Obviously "Take" is more simple if Linq is an option. –  Meta-Knight Jan 6 '10 at 17:17
    
I suggest a language improvement for version 5.0 maybe. for(;;), ++ operators and the like would need setting 'oldschool' context, something like current 'unsafe' –  George Polevoy Jan 6 '10 at 17:22
    
As I said... sometimes Linq and Extension methods are not an option b/c of the framework version you are working on. –  Nick Jan 6 '10 at 18:54
    
+1, sometimes you can't always use the latest and greatest! :) –  Joshua Jan 6 '10 at 19:35

Use Enumerable.Take:

foreach(var rssItem in rss.Channel.Items.Take(6)) {
    // go time!
}

Note that

rss.Channel.Items.Take(6)

does not do anything except instantiate an implementation of IEnumerable that can be iterated over to produce the first six items in the enumeration. This is the deferred execution feature of LINQ to Objects.

Note further that this assumes .NET 3.5. If you are working with an earlier version of .NET, you could use something along the lines of the following:

static IEnumerable<T> Take<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int take) {
    if (source == null) {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    }
    if (take < 0) {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("take");
    }
    if (take == 0) {
        yield break;
    }
    int count = 0;
    foreach (T item in source) {
        count++;
        yield return item;
        if (count >= take) {
            yield break;
        }
    }
}

Then:

foreach(var rssItem in Take(rss.Channel.Items, 6)) {
    // go time!
}

This assumes .NET 2.0. If you're not using .NET 2.0 you should seriously consider upgrading.

share|improve this answer
    
yield isn't in C# 2, Take would have to build and return a new IEnumerable<T> to work if the developer is still using VS2005. –  Chris Charabaruk Jan 6 '10 at 16:43
3  
No, yield is C# 2.0. Iterators were introduced in C# 2.0/.NET 2.0. cf. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dscyy5s0(VS.80).aspx and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9k7k7cf0(VS.80).aspx –  Jason Jan 6 '10 at 16:45
rss.Channel.Items.Take(6)
share|improve this answer

If you're interested in a condition (i.e. ordering by date created)

foreach(var rssItem in rss.Channel.Items.OrderByDescending(x=>x.CreateDate).Take(6)) 
{
//do something
}

Perhaps if you want to get those created by a certain user, with that same sort

foreach(var rssItem in rss.Channel.Items
                          .Where(x=>x.UserID == 1)
                          .OrderByDescending(x=>x.CreateDate)
                          .Take(6)) 
{
//do something
}
share|improve this answer

You could also just break out of the loop if you don't want to use linq.

        int count = 0;
        foreach (var rssItem in rss.Channel.Items)
        {
            if (++count == 6) break;
            ...
        }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.