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I have only a single key-value pair in dictionary. I want to assign key to one variable and it's value to another variable. I have tried with below ways but I am getting error for same.

>>> d ={"a":1}

>>> d.items()
[('a', 1)]

>>> (k,v) = d.items()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: need more than 1 value to unpack

>>> (k, v) = list(d.items())
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: need more than 1 value to unpack

I know that we can extract key and value one by one, or by for loop and iteritems(), but isn't there a simple way such that we can assign both in single statement?

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5  
k, v = d.items()[0] ? – Jakob Bowyer Nov 22 '13 at 13:19
    
Out of curiosity - what reason do you have for doing this? – Jon Clements Nov 22 '13 at 13:21
    
dict = {'Name': 'Zara', 'Age': 7, 'Class': 'First'}; print "dict['Name']: ", dict['Name']; print "dict['Age']: ", dict['Age']; – Unknown User Nov 22 '13 at 13:21
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Add another level, with a tuple (just the comma):

(k, v), = d.items()

or with a list:

[(k, v)] = d.items()

or pick out the first element:

k, v = d.items()[0]

The first two have the added advantage that they throw an exception if your dictionary has more than one key.

Demo:

>>> d = {'foo': 'bar'}
>>> (k, v), = d.items()
>>> k, v
('foo', 'bar')
>>> [(k, v)] = d.items()
>>> k, v
('foo', 'bar')
>>> k, v = d.items()[0]
>>> k, v
('foo', 'bar')
share|improve this answer
    
@MartijnPieters, what's the technical explanation behind : (k, v), = d.items(). I cannot get my head around the last comma. – dmeu Jul 13 '15 at 6:25
    
@dmeu: it is a tuple assignment, the comma makes the left-hand side target a tuple. – Martijn Pieters Jul 13 '15 at 7:41
    
@MartijnPieters And what is on the right-hand side? :) I mean why does it no twork without the comma? – dmeu Jul 13 '15 at 8:26
1  
@dmeu: why not try it out? dict.items() returns an iterable containing (key, value) pairs. What do you think happens with foo = dict.items() vs. foo, = dict.items()? The first binds foo to whatever dict.items() returns (a list in Python 2, a dictionary view in Python 3). foo, = dict.items() binds foo to the first element in the dict.items() sequence and throws an exception if there are 0 or more than 1 elements in that sequence. – Martijn Pieters Jul 13 '15 at 8:33
    
@dmeu: (k, v), = d.items() just takes that one step further. Take the first item, a (key, value) pair, and assign that to (k, v). – Martijn Pieters Jul 13 '15 at 8:34

items() returns a list of tuples so:

(k,v) = d.items()[0]
share|improve this answer
>>> d = {"a":1}
>>> [(k, v)] = d.items()
>>> k
'a'
>>> v
1

Or using next, iter:

>>> k, v = next(iter(d.items()))
>>> k
'a'
>>> v
1
>>>
share|improve this answer
    d ={"a":1}

you can do

    k, v = d.keys()[0], d.values()[0]

d.keys() will actually return list of all keys and d.values return list of all values, since you have a single key:value pair in d you will be accessing the first element in list of keys and values

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This is best if you have many items in the dictionary, since it doesn't actually create a list but yields just one key-value pair.

k, v = next(d.iteritems())

Of course, if you have more than one item in the dictionary, there's no way to know which one you'll get out.

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You have a list. You must index the list in order to access the elements.

(k,v) = d.items()[0]
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