Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I didn't know Python 3 has made such change.

Python 2.7.5 (default, May 15 2013, 22:44:16) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
>>> def f():
    pass

>>> f.__name__ = 'g'
>>> f
<function g at 0x000000000264C6D8>

While in Python 3:

Python 3.3.2 (v3.3.2:d047928ae3f6, May 16 2013, 00:06:53) [MSC v.1600 64 bit (AMD64)]   on win32
Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
>>> def f():
    pass

>>> f.__name__ = 'g'
>>> f
<function f at 0x0000000003335AE8>

What's the reason to do so? Am I missing anything?

share|improve this question
1  
please don't post screenshots of code – user4815162342 Nov 22 '13 at 14:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use __qualname__ instead:

>>> def f():
...     pass
...
>>> f.__qualname__ = 'g'
>>> f
<function g at 0x0000000002AE5C80>

According to PEP 3155 -- Qualified name for classes and functions - Proposal:

The repr() and str() of functions and classes is modified to use __qualname__ rather than __name__.

See also: What's New in Python 3.3 - PEP 3155: Qualified name for classes and functions.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.