Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically I have code which looks like this inside a header file:

class Bar;
class Foo
{
public:
   Bar GetBar();
};

class Bar
{
    Foo CreateFoo() {}
};

Bar Foo::GetBar()
{...}

The problem with this code is that as soon as the header is included in more then one file the linker will complain that there are multiple definitions of Foo::GetBar. However I can't put it inside the class definition where that would work, because Bar isn't defined at that point. I don't want to put it inside a seperate .cpp file, because the rest of the library I'm writing (which isn't that heavy weight anyway) is mostly templates I would have to place in a header anyway and it seems a bit anoying to require linking something else in only because I had to put one function outside the header.

So is there anyway to solve this problem without creating another .cpp file?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
inline Bar Foo::GetBar()
{...}
share|improve this answer
    
One question though, since inline is basically a hint to the compiler, but does not actually force the compiler to inline the function, does this still works if the compiler decides not to inline it ? –  Matthieu M. Jan 6 '10 at 17:36
3  
@Matthieu: it also gives the function "inline linkage", which basically means you're allowed multiple definitions (as long as they're all the same). –  Mike Seymour Jan 6 '10 at 17:49

You can declare this Foo::GetBar() function inline. I should solve the multiple definitions.

share|improve this answer

Make the function explicitly inline:

inline Bar Foo::GetBar()
{...}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.