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How can I get the default value in match case?

//Just an example, this value is usually not known
val something: String = "value"

something match {
    case "val" => "default"
    case _ => smth(_) //need to reference the value here - doesn't work
}

UPDATE: I see that my issue was not really understood, which is why I'm showing an example which is closer to the real thing I'm working on:

val db =    current.configuration.getList("instance").get.unwrapped()
            .map(f => f.asInstanceOf[java.util.HashMap[String, String]].toMap)
            .find(el => el("url").contains(referer))
            .getOrElse(Map("config" -> ""))
            .get("config").get match {
                case "" => current.configuration.getString("database").getOrElse("defaultDatabase")
                case _  => doSomethingWithDefault(_)
            }
share|improve this question
2  
Not sure, you mean this maybe? case _ => smth(something) –  David Riccitelli Nov 22 '13 at 15:34
1  
val config = current.configuration.getList("instance").get.unwrapped() .map(f => f.asInstanceOf[java.util.HashMap[String, String]].toMap) .find(el => el("url").contains(referer)) .getOrElse(Map("config" -> "")) .get("config").get and then config match .... –  David Riccitelli Nov 22 '13 at 15:47
2  
nope it's not ... I'll try to get the speech from Martin Odersky where he specifically tells: "don't do one liners" :-) –  David Riccitelli Nov 22 '13 at 15:51
1  
@Caballero not necessarily, readability wins, always =) –  abronan Nov 22 '13 at 15:53
1  
There we go, youtube.com/watch?v=kkTFx3-duc8, minute 15 onwards "Don't pack too much as an expression". –  David Riccitelli Nov 22 '13 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
something match {
    case "val" => "default"
    case default => smth(default)
}

It is not a keyword, just an alias, so this will work as well:

something match {
    case "val" => "default"
    case everythingElse => smth(everythingElse)
}
share|improve this answer
    
or if you don't need to use the variable, it can be anonymous: case _ => doSomething –  Jeroen Kransen Nov 22 '13 at 16:05
    
@JeroenKransen your proposition is exactly equals to what op started from –  om-nom-nom Nov 22 '13 at 16:16
    
I didn't understand the valid question either. There was a similar recent question, How do I refer to _ in an anon function. Maybe it's like one of those optical illusion puzzles. –  som-snytt Nov 23 '13 at 2:18

The "_" in Scala is a love-and-hate syntax which could really useful and yet confusing.

In your example:

something match {
    case "val" => "default"
    case _ => smth(_) //need to reference the value here - doesn't work
}

the _ means, I don't care about the value, as well as the type, which means you can't reference to the identifier anymore. Therefore, smth(_) would not have a proper reference.
The solution is that you can give the a name to the identifier like:

something match {
    case "val" => "default"
    case x => smth(x)
}

I believe this is a working syntax and x will match any value but not "val".

More speaking. I think you are confused with the usage of underscore in map, flatmap, for example.

val mylist = List(1, 2, 3)
mylist map { println(_) }

Where the underscore here is referencing to the iterable item in the collection. Of course, this underscore could even be taken as:

mylist map { println } 
share|improve this answer
    
Actually it is not only the Scala thing -- the underscode-for-things-I-don't care is used in SML, Clojure and some other languages. –  om-nom-nom Nov 22 '13 at 18:43

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