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There are some actions I want to do in different queues, so I use semaphore.But there are leaks when I check it with instruments. The frame is dispatch_semaphore_create. I use ARC and there's no leaks when I check it before. The code looks like :

dispatch_async(queue,^{
     dispatch_semaphore_t signal = dispatch_semaphore_create(1);
     for (int i=0;i<100;i++)
     {
            dispatch_semaphore_wait(signal, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);
            dispatch_async(queue,^{
                /* some actions */
                dispatch_semaphore_signal(signal);
            }); 
     }
});

The code is just like this, I use WINDOWS computer when enter it, so there are some spell errors, I'm sorry.

P.S.

I want to delete cells of a table view with animation one by one, if I delete them with a array of their indexpaths by using deleteRowsAtIndexpaths method or with for circulation to delete them in main queue, they will be deleted together, not one by one, so I use two queues to do it. The code is like:

dispatch_async(queue,^{

     dispatch_semaphore_t signal = dispatch_semaphore_create(1);

     for (int i=0;;i++)
     {
            dispatch_semaphore_wait(signal, DISPATCH_TIME_FOREVER);

            if (i == [indexPathsAry count])
            {
                 dispatch_semaphore_signal(finishAllSignal);
                 break;
            }

            dispatch_async(main_queue,^{
                NSIndexPath *indexPath = indexPathsAry[0];
                id item = items[indexPath.row];
                [items removeObject:item];

                [tableView beginUpdates];
                [tableView deleteRowsAtIndexPaths:indexPath withAnimation:...];
                [tableView endUpdates];
                dispatch_semaphore_signal(signal);
            }); 
     }
});

P.S. Sorry,NSIndexPath *indexPath = indexPathsAry[i]; needs to change to NSIndexPath *indexPath = indexPathsAry[0]; The code will delete cells one by one correctly not delete them together. And it said that there are leaks in line dispatch_semaphore_t signal = dispatch_semaphore_create(1); but when I test this code in a small demo, it works well, so I don't know why. And at first I use dispatch_sync instead of semaphore, but it doesn't work synchronously sometimes, it confused me. Is it because there are too many queues in my project?

share|improve this question
    
How about dispatch_release(signal); when you're all done? Whether or not dispatch objects behave as ObjC objects (and therefore participate in ARC) is dependent on the deployment target version of your project. IIRC, you need iOS6 or later and/or OSX 10.8 or later to get that behavior. Otherwise, dispatch_release. – ipmcc Nov 22 '13 at 17:21
    
If this was done on a serial queue, this code would deadlock that queue because you're signaling and waiting on the same queue. You'd leak as a result. Also, you say you're dealing with communicating between different queues, so perhaps you can update your example to illustrate what you're doing. This particular example could be implemented far more simply with a simple serial queue with no semaphore needed. Help us understand what these two queues are for and the dependencies between their respective tasks, and then we can provide more useful counsel. – Rob Nov 22 '13 at 17:51
    
The target version is iOS 7.So I didn't release the signal. – pingshw Nov 23 '13 at 2:51
    
Thank you, Rob. And I add some codes. – pingshw Nov 23 '13 at 3:10

The cause of your leak isn't evident from the code you've posted. That said, using background queues and semaphores probably isn't the best way go about this. At best, it leaves two threads blocked for most of the duration of the sequence (one that periodically wakes up to enqueue the next remove operation and the other that's waiting on finishAllSignal.) There are better approaches. Which approach is best really depends on the exact effect you're going for.

For instance, your current approach looks like it will, in the common case, allow (at least) one spin of the main runloop between starting the delete operations/animations (see below for explanation.) My first thought would be to use a timer to start each removal a frame or two later than the previous. It would look something like this:

NSArray* indexPathsAry = @[ ... ];
const NSTimeInterval intervalInSeconds = 1.0 / 30.0;

__block NSUInteger i = 0;

dispatch_source_t timer = dispatch_source_create(DISPATCH_SOURCE_TYPE_TIMER, 0, 0, dispatch_get_main_queue());
dispatch_source_set_timer(timer, DISPATCH_TIME_NOW,  (uint64_t)(intervalInSeconds * NSEC_PER_SEC), 0);
dispatch_source_set_event_handler(timer, ^{
    NSIndexPath *indexPath = indexPathsAry[i++];
    id item = items[indexPath.row];
    [items removeObject:item];

    [tableView beginUpdates];
    [tableView deleteRowsAtIndexPaths:indexPath withAnimation:...];
    [tableView endUpdates];

    if (i >= indexPathsAry.count)
    {
        dispatch_source_cancel(timer);
    }
});

dispatch_source_set_cancel_handler(timer, ^{
    // whatever you want to happen when all the removes are done.
})
dispatch_resume(timer);

If you really need to guarantee exactly/only one spin (which isn't guaranteed by your semaphore approach FWIW) of the run loop then NSOperation is probably the easiest way (since the main thread NSOperationQueue only services one operation per run loop spin.) If you need the "completion" behavior (i.e. finishAllSignal) you can achieve that using NSOperation dependencies. It might look like this:

NSOperation* finishOp = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{
    // ... whatever you want to have happen when all deletes have been processed.
}];

for (NSIndexPath* toDelete in indexPathsAry)
{
    NSOperation* op = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{
        id item = items[toDelete.row];
        [items removeObject: item];

        [tableView beginUpdates];
        [tableView deleteRowsAtIndexPaths: @[toDelete] withAnimation:...];
        [tableView endUpdates];
    }];
    [finishOp addDependency: op];
    [[NSOperationQueue mainQueue] addOperation: op];
}
[[NSOperationQueue mainQueue] addOperation: finishOp];

Neither of these approaches should suffer leaks. Furthermore, either of these approaches are going to be better than leaving two threads waiting on semaphores for however long.

More details:

Here's an explanation of what I think the posted approach is going to do:

  • The background thread enqueues a block for the main thread, then goes to sleep waiting on the semaphore.
  • The main thread runloop is woken up by libdispatch and eventually executes the block.
  • That block removes the item, and starts the remove animation on the table view for removing that one row.
  • Then it signals the semaphore, and is done. The main thread is currently executing (i.e. not sleeping) and will continue to process blocks from the main dispatch queue until there are no more, and will eventually move on with the run loop, eventually going to sleep waiting for the next event/wake up.
  • The background thread wakes up at some later time because of the semaphore signaling. At this point, these steps repeat.

One thing to note is that there is not strong coupling between the main run loop and the background threads. If there were another, unrelated, block enqueued on the main queue after your block, then the background queue might get the next delete block onto the main queue before the unrelated block is finished. If that happens, those two delete blocks could execute on the same runloop pass, and the two corresponding items would appear to be deleted simultaneously. In the common case, this probably won't happen, but my point is that the one-delete-per-runloop-pass behavior is not guaranteed by the semaphore approach, but I believe will be guaranteed by the NSOperation approach.

Honestly, the timer approach is probably the best because it semantically captures what it sounds like you want here, i.e. for rows to delete one after the another with some minimal delay between them.

share|improve this answer
    
First, both of these examples would appear to suffer from OPs original flaw that he's mutating his table and data source, but then referencing is original array of indexPaths, which is no longer valid. As soon as you remove one object (unless you iterate backwards), the old indexPaths array is no longer valid. Second, I infer from his example that he wanted some delay between the various row deletions (otherwise, he would have just removed all in a single call), so your operation queue example will appear to happen nearly instantaneously unless you introduce some delay somehow. – Rob Nov 23 '13 at 16:41
    
Also, aren't the beginUpdates and endUpdates calls redundant? I only use them if I have a more than one change to my tableview between beginUpdates and endUpdates. – Rob Nov 23 '13 at 16:41
    
+1 But the basic timer approach is a good one (as long as pingshw handles the fact that the index paths have changed every tick). – Rob Nov 23 '13 at 16:45
    
Yeah, I didn't dig into the logic of his code, but you're right -- it's flawed. I've observe that [NSOperationQueue mainQueue] only processes one operation per runloop pass, so I presented that as the minimal means by which to have them not disappear all at once (i.e. each remove operation separated by a pass of the run loop). As mentioned, I think the timer approach is probably the best based on his question. Nice catch on the dispatch_group -- a vestige of earlier thoughts. Edited. – ipmcc Nov 23 '13 at 16:58
    
Understood, but the runloops happen so quickly (measured in milliseconds) and the table update animation happens asynchronously, so the effect will appear to be to animate all of the rows simultaneously, in my experience. Just delaying to the next run loop is not enough to have a observable difference in the UI (which is why I used the sleepforTimeInterval on a background queue to which you objected in my example). But without timer or discernible delay, it will appear to happen simultaneously. – Rob Nov 23 '13 at 17:17

I don't see how this could have possibly worked, as there strike me as a bunch of issues with this code:

  1. I'm inferring that your intent was to animate each of the rows being deleted individually, this wouldn't do it, because the deleteRowsAtIndexPaths only initiates the animation. This code will make them look like they were all deleted at almost the same time.

  2. I don't see how this could possibly work, as you're mutating the structures (your array and tableview) as you're iterating through that structure. For example, when i == 0, everything is fine as you've remove the first item, but by the time i == 1, what was the second item in you array is now the first item in the array, so when you are referencing indexPathsAry[i], you're now grabbing what was originally the third item, as what was originally the second item is now at indexPathsAry[0].

  3. The deleteRowsAtIndexPaths method takes an array of index paths, not a single index path.

  4. The use of semaphores here is entirely unnecessary. A more logical pattern is:

    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create("com.company.app.tableupdate", 0);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        dispatch_async(queue, ^{
            dispatch_sync(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                // do some stuff to the table
            });
            [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:0.1]; // if you want a little delay before the next one
        });
    }
    

    This creates a serial queue, adds a bunch of tasks to that queue, which, themselves, synchronously do something on the main queue and then waits before starting the next one. This achieves the same effect as I think you intended.

  5. You are going through your entire table view data source, deleting items one at a time. That's fine if the number of items does not greatly exceed the number of visible rows, but I'd suggest that you really want to (a) remove anything not currently visible; (b) then animate the removing of the visible ones. That will achieve the desired visual effect while not making the user wait for the animation of rows that were not original visible.

Having said all of that, I don't see anything in this code sample that would suggest a leak (which was your original question). You should share information about what objects were being reported as leaking.


By the way, if you want to animate the visible cells' removal from the tableview before you remove everything from the table, you could also do something like:

NSInteger count = [self.tableView.indexPathsForVisibleRows count];

// first animate the cells flying off to the right

[self.tableView.indexPathsForVisibleRows enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(NSIndexPath *indexPath, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.25 delay:idx * 0.05 options:0 animations:^{
        UITableViewCell *cell = [self.tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:indexPath];
        cell.transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(self.view.frame.size.width, 0);
    } completion:^(BOOL finished) {

        // if it's the last one, empty the data source and refresh the table

        if (idx == (count - 1)) {
            [self emptyTableDataSource];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
        }
    }];
}];
share|improve this answer
    
Replacing OP's use of semaphores with calls to [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:0.1] may be semantically closer to what OP wants but is still kinda bogus (in as much as any "sleep" call is bogus.) – ipmcc Nov 23 '13 at 16:10
    
@ipmcc Perhaps, though I personally don't object to it too much when (a) done on a background queue; and (b) is such a negligibly small value. But I'm sympathetic to the observation and as you'll see in my final example, I'm just using the delay option on the animation rather than sleeping. – Rob Nov 23 '13 at 16:19
    
yeah, it should always delete cell at indexPaths[0], I enter it with some errors, Sorry! There are leaks in the line which create a semaphore. – pingshw Nov 24 '13 at 7:15
    
@pingshw Better, but this code still can't possibly work (deleteRowsAtIndexPaths takes array of NSIndexPath objects; after you delete the first row of the table, any index paths in your array that were in the same section are now invalid so even using indexPathsAry[0] will not fix that; etc.). It's silly for us to look for leaks in something other than the real code. And we would simply advise that you refactor to eliminate semaphores altogether as this is, at best, an inelegant pattern. – Rob Nov 24 '13 at 14:30
    
@pingshw But, as to why you're leaking, there's nothing in the code provided that would explain it. I'd suggest (a) make sure the dispatched blocks are completing (one misplaced semaphore could keep block from completing, hanging on to any objects the block references); and (b) make sure the object that created this wasn't subject to strong reference cycle. Bottom line, use instruments to identify what objects are still "live" (don't rely on "leaks" tool, use "allocations" with heap shots) and then backtrack their retain count lifecycle. – Rob Nov 24 '13 at 14:33

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