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Minimal working example.

#include <cassert>
#include <list>
#include <queue>
//#define USE_PQ

struct MyClass
{
    const char* str;
    MyClass(const char* _str) : str(_str) {}
    MyClass(MyClass&& src) { str = src.str; src.str = nullptr; }
    MyClass(const MyClass&) = delete;
};

struct cmp_func
{
    bool operator() (const MyClass&, const MyClass&) const
    {
        return true;
    }
};

typedef std::priority_queue<MyClass, std::vector<MyClass>, cmp_func> pq_type;

#ifdef USE_PQ
MyClass remove_front(pq_type& l)
{
    MyClass moved = std::move(l.top());
    // error from the above line:
    // use of deleted function ‘MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass&)’
    l.pop();
    return std::move(moved);
}
#else
MyClass remove_front(std::list<MyClass>& l)
{
    MyClass moved = std::move(l.front());
    l.erase(l.begin());
    return std::move(moved);
}
#endif

int main()
{
    const char* hello_str = "Hello World!";
    MyClass first(hello_str);
#ifdef USE_PQ
    pq_type l;
    l.push(std::move(first));
    MyClass moved = remove_front(l);
#else
    std::list<MyClass> l;
    l.push_back(std::move(first));
    MyClass moved = remove_front(l);
#endif
    assert(moved.str);
    assert(!first.str);
    return 0;
}

So this works. Now remove the comment signs from line 4 and it says that copy constructors would be needed (mine is deleted). Also, it misses operator=. Questions:

  • What is the difference here?
  • Can the problem be fixed? If yes, how, if no, why not?

Note: You can also use boost's priority_queue for your answer, but I got the same error with it.

share|improve this question
2  
priority_queue::top() returns const reference, so even after move it is still an lvalue. –  Siyuan Ren Nov 22 '13 at 16:17
    
@C.R. std::move is just a cast to an rvalue reference, so any lvalue of type const T will be converted to const T&&, which is an rvalue -- even though you cannot acquire resources through it. –  dyp Nov 22 '13 at 17:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That seems to be an oversight in the design of std::priority_queue<T>. There doesn't appear to be a way to directly move (not copy) an element out of it. The problem is that top() returns a const T&, so that cannot bind to a T&&. And pop() returns void, so you can't get it out of that either.

However, there's a workaround. It's as good as guaranteed that the objects inside the priority queue are not actually const. They are normal objects, the queue just doesn't give mutable access to them. Therefore, it's perfectly legal to do this:

MyClass moved = std::move(const_cast<MyClass&>(l.top()));
l.pop();

As @DyP pointed out in comments, you should make certain that the moved-from object is still viable for being passed to the queue's comparator. And I believe that in order to preserve the preconditions of the queue, it would have to compare the same as it did before (which is next to impossible to achieve).

Therefore, you should encapsulate the cast & top() and pop() calls in a function and make sure no modifications to the queue happen in between. If you do that, you can be reasonably certain the comparator will not be invoked on the moved-from object.

And of course, such a function should be extremely well documented.


Note that whenever you provide a custom copy/move constructor for a class, you should provide the corresponding copy/move assignment operator as well (otherwise, the class can behave inconsistently). So just give your class a deleted copy assignment operator and an appropriate move assignment operator.

(Note: Yes, there are situations when you want a move-constructible, but not move-assignable class, but they're extremely rare (and you'll know them if you ever find them). As a rule of thumb, always provide the ctor and assignment op at the same time)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I still get errors, because my operator= is missing (error comes from the line l.pop()). Can we get around this error aswell? –  Johannes Nov 22 '13 at 16:36
    
@Johannes Edited; just provide the assignment op. –  Angew Nov 22 '13 at 16:44
2  
It might be necessary to carefully formulate the requirements on the moved object: it still has to be able to be compared with, as top+pop are not "atomic". Maybe someone could propose an extension? –  dyp Nov 22 '13 at 16:44
    
@Angew Thanks, this works indeed. Very good answer. –  Johannes Nov 22 '13 at 16:52
1  
There's already a proposal in the the isocpp proposals forum from May to solve this issue, see groups.google.com/a/isocpp.org/d/msg/std-proposals/TIst1FOdveo/… –  dyp Nov 27 '13 at 18:00

There might be a very good reason why there is no non-(const-ref) top(): modifying the object would break the priority_queue invariant. So that const_cast trick is probably only going to work if you pop right after.

share|improve this answer

What is the difference here?

MyClass remove_front(pq_type& l)
{
    MyClass moved = std::move(l.top()); // PROBLEM
    l.pop();
    return std::move(moved);
}

std::priority_queue::top returns a const value_type&, so you cannot call std::move (which takes a T&&).

MyClass remove_front(std::list<MyClass>& l)
{
    MyClass moved = std::move(l.front());
    l.erase(l.begin());
    return std::move(moved);
}

std::list::front has an overload that returns a reference, so it has a way to bind to a T&&.

I'm unsure why top does not have a non-const overload (potentially an oversight in the standard?). You can use const_cast to get around that, but make sure you write thorough comments describing what you are doing and why.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but any solution to the missing operator= problem from the line l.pop()? –  Johannes Nov 22 '13 at 16:38
    
You'd need to define that function. Currently you are defining the move-constructor, but not the move-assignment operator. –  Zac Howland Nov 22 '13 at 16:55

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