Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

test_header.h:

typedef enum _test_enum test_enum;
enum _test_enum
{
    red,
    green,
    blue
};

typedef struct _test_struct test_struct;
struct _test_struct
{
    int s1;
    int s2;
    int s3;
};

test.c:

#include <test_header.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    test_struct s;
    s.s1=1;
    s.s2=2;
    s.s3=3;
    printf("Hello %d %d %d\n", s.s1, s.s2, s.s3 );
}

test_cpp.cpp:

extern "C"{
    #include <test_header.h>
}
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    test_struct s;
    s.s1=1;
    s.s2=2;
    s.s3=3;
    printf("Hello %d %d %d\n", s.s1, s.s2, s.s3 );
}

Notice how I am typedef'ing the struct and the enum the same way. When I compile in straight C with gcc -I. test.c -o test it works fine, but when compiled in C++ with gcc -I. test_cpp.cpp -o test_cpp, I get the following error:

./test_header.h:1:14: error: use of enum ‘_test_enum’ without previous declaration

So my question is twofold: why does this work in C but not C++, and why does the compiler accept the struct but not the enum?

I get the same behavior when declaring the struct above the enum. I'm using GCC 4.8.2.

share|improve this question
    
why does this work in C but not C++? -- Simple answer: C and C++ are different languages. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 22 '13 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

ISO C standard forbids forward references to enum types. I'm not completely sure, but I guess that this is the excerpt that confirms it:

6.7 Declarations

1 [...]

Constraints

2 A declaration shall declare at least a declarator (other than the parameters of a function or the members of a structure or union), a tag, or the members of an enumeration.

3 [...]

Please, if this is wrong, and you know which section exactly refers to the issue, correct me.

As a result, you are not allowed to use forward declarations of enumerations in C. Though, GCC allows it as an extension, but will certainly throw a warning if you enable -Wpedantic switch.

By the way, you could have written it like this:

typedef enum {
  red,
  green,
  blue,
} test_enum;

and it is perfectly fine according to standard, and thus will compile even with -Wpedantic -Werror.

share|improve this answer
    
can we have any reference of the standard? I mean which section of the standard? –  user1814023 Nov 22 '13 at 17:27
    
A link to that part of the standard would be nice, I would like to know why structs are treated differently. Why is it enabled by default in C but not C++? –  monkeypants Nov 22 '13 at 17:47
    
Updated, take a look. –  Haroogan Nov 22 '13 at 17:49
    
I seriously don't understand what the standard is saying here. Can anyone explain this. Want to know... –  user1814023 Nov 22 '13 at 17:50
1  
@Nishith: Basically, it says that declaration of enumeration cannot be done without specifying its members, i.e. forward declaration simply cannot be done for enum. –  Haroogan Nov 22 '13 at 17:57

The enum is an integral type and the compiler chooses the exact type according to the range of values of the enumeration. So you can't do a forward declaration of an enum.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.