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Edit2: Now fails for test({64, 1, 36, 81}, 82)
Edit1: Now updated to fix problems because of delta > max(items)
Edit0: Now updated to fix the infinite recursion due to oscillating delta problem.


In this algorithms video (at around 2:52) Prof. Skiena specifies the knapsack problem as follows...

The Knapsack problem: Given a set of integers S = {s1, s2,..., sN} and given a target number T find a subset of S which adds up exactly to T.

Then he goes on to say that this is one of those problems for which no known efficient solution exists!

But I tried anyway and here is my attempt at a solution (and it seems to work for the numbers I have tried)...

from itertools import accumulate

#items   - All available items
#target  - The size of the knapsack
#returns - A subset of {items} whose sum adds upto target
#          if possible else returns None
def KnapsackItems(items, target):
    s = sum(items)
    if s < target:
        return None
    delta = s - target

    if delta == 0:
        return items

    if delta in items:
        result = items - {delta}
        return result

    if delta > max(items):
        sortedItems = list(sorted(items))
        deltas = list(map(lambda x: x - target, accumulate(sortedItems)))
        ul = [i for i,d in zip(sortedItems, deltas) if d <= i]
        return KnapsackItems(set(ul), target)
    else:
        U = {i for i in items if i < delta}

    V = KnapsackItems(U, delta)
    if V:
        result = items - V
        return result
    return None

And here is the test harness...

def test(items, target):
    print("Items:", items)
    print("Target:", target)

    result = KnapsackItems(items, target)

    if result and not sum(result) == target:
        print("Result:", result)
        print("FAIL: sum of returned set does not match target ({})".format(target))
    elif result:
        print("Result:", result)
        print("Success (sum of returned set:{})".format(sum(result)))
    else:
        print("No solution could be found")

Examples from the video...

test({1,2,5,9,10}, 22)
test({1,2,5,9,10}, 23) #No solution expected
test({1,2,3,4,5}, 11)
test({1,2}, 2)
test({4,3,2}, 5)
test({1, 3, 4, 7, 9}, 13)
test({6,7,8,3,14,5,15,2,4}, 29)
test({1,2,3,4,5,6,7},14)
test({64, 1, 36, 81}, 82)

Result...

Items: {9, 10, 2, 5, 1}
Target: 22
Result: {9, 10, 2, 1}
Success (sum of returned set:22)

Items: {9, 10, 2, 5, 1}
Target: 23
No solution could be found

Items: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}
Target: 11
Result: {1, 2, 3, 5}
Success (sum of returned set:11)

Items: {1, 2}
Target: 2
Result: {2}
Success (sum of returned set:2)

Items: {2, 3, 4}
Target: 5
Result: {2, 3}
Success (sum of returned set:5)

Items: {9, 3, 4, 1, 7}
Target: 13
Result: {9, 4}
Success (sum of returned set:13)

Items: {2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 14, 15}
Target: 29
Result: {14, 15}
Success (sum of returned set:29)

Items: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7}
Target: 14
Result: {2, 5, 7}
Success (sum of returned set:14)

Items: {64, 81, 36, 1}
Target: 82
No solution could be found

So now I guess the question is what is wrong with my solution to the knapsack problem? Is it inefficient and unusable for very large sets of numbers? Also please let me know if this is not the right place for such questions.

share|improve this question
    
Might be better suited for codereview.stackexchange.com –  CDspace Nov 22 '13 at 17:49
    
KnapsackItems({1, 3, 5}, 9) gives a stack overflow error –  sanity Nov 22 '13 at 17:49
    
So does KnapsackItems({1, 3, 4, 7, 9}, 13) –  sanity Nov 22 '13 at 17:50
    
@sanity nice catch! Let me see if I can fix this. –  Sandeep Datta Nov 22 '13 at 17:50
    
I suspect the core issue here is that there needs to be a way for the algorithm to "backtrack", ie. try something, but then go back and try something else. –  sanity Nov 22 '13 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

When max(items) < target < sum - max(items) (I don't know Python) then delta will always be more than max(items) and no items will ever be removed before the recursive check, and the algorithm will never terminate.

Edited version:

It now fails when max(items) cannot be part of the solution (such as when max(items) > target) and max(items) < delta. Example: {2, 3, 4, 6}, 5. After the first iteration, it becomes {2, 3, 4}, 10, which returns None, causing the top level call to return None, which is incorrect.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually in the first step, no of item shall be removed. But will it be true for successive steps as well? Because delta is changing at each step. –  user1990169 Nov 22 '13 at 18:22
    
@KendallFrey Yup this seems to be the problem with the example given by sanity. KnapsackItems({1, 3, 4, 7, 9}, 13). May be this is a fatal flaw (or may be not) let me see if I can work this out. Delta oscillates between 13 and 11 in this case. –  Sandeep Datta Nov 22 '13 at 18:23
    
@AbhishekBansal Yes, when this is true for the first step, it will be true for future steps as well. –  Kendall Frey Nov 22 '13 at 18:23
    
@KendallFrey Aah yes I see, then delta will oscillate. –  user1990169 Nov 22 '13 at 18:28
    
@KendallFrey please see updated solution. Does it fix your problem? –  Sandeep Datta Nov 22 '13 at 18:49
KnapsackItems({6,7,8,3,14,5,15,2,4}, 29)

  File "C:\Program Files (x86)\Wing IDE 101 4.1\src\debug\tserver\_sandbox.py", line 95, in KnapsackItems
  File "C:\Program Files (x86)\Wing IDE 101 4.1\src\debug\tserver\_sandbox.py", line 95, in <setcomp>
builtins.RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth excee

Apparently 1 million dollar question is not that easy to solve :)

share|improve this answer
    
Lol, I guess so :) –  Sandeep Datta Nov 22 '13 at 18:05

There are chances of infinite recursion, like the following data set.

For example,
{(1,2,3,4,5,6,7),14}
sum = 28.
delta = 14.

So if sum = 2 * target, and max(items) < target then it will cause infinite recursion.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the main issue with this answer is that the OP is right. If any single item larger than the delta is not in the solution, the remaining items must sum to less than the target, and thus the solution is not a solution. –  Kendall Frey Nov 22 '13 at 18:03
    
@KendallFrey Yes you are right. I have edited my answer. –  user1990169 Nov 22 '13 at 18:10
    
@AbhishekBansal I have fixed this problem. –  Sandeep Datta Nov 22 '13 at 19:36

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