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I'm trying to find best polynomial fit to set of input points.

this is my code so far:

    x=(1:length(meanValues));
    y=meanValues(:);        

    A=fliplr(vander(x));
    v=A \ y;
    P(1: length(x))=0;
    for i=1: length(x)
        for j=1: length(v)
            P(i)=P(i)+v(j)*x(i).^(j-1);
        end
    end    
    plot(x,y,'r*');
    hold on;
    plot(x, P);
  • meanValues is [1x127] vector filled with double values between (0.0000-5.0000]

Bellow are plotted meanValues:

raw set of points

and result: result of polyfit

Anybody knows, where the errors are?

EDIT 1:

So this time, I went trough all polynomial orders and find the best fitting one. Is this better? Can I optimize this code? It needs approximately 1s to compute, so in total amount will take ~ 30s.

    tic
    x=(1:length(meanValues));
    y=meanValues(:)'; 
    for i=1:length(meanValues)-1
        [p,s,mu] = polyfit(x,y, i);
        [f,delta] = polyval(p,x,s,mu);
        if i==1
            minf=f;
            minmse = mean(delta.^2);
            minp=p;
        elseif minmse>mean(delta.^2)
            minf=f;
            minmse = mean(delta.^2);
            minp=p;
        end
    end
    toc
    plot(x,y,'r*',x,minf,'-');
    axis([0 length(meanValues) 0 max(meanValues)]);

poly fit

share|improve this question
    
My opinion is that, if you need to study the concavity of a set of points as you say in your comment below, you should use a spline. Two adjacent segments with slopes of opposite signs will give you the right concavity. –  randomatlabuser Nov 23 '13 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to develop some method of iterating through all the polynomial orders that you would like to consider for a fit. Throughout this iteration you then calculate the error between the model P and the data y. Mean squared error is a common measure of similarity that I would suggest.

Currently you have no way of changing the model order and it is in fact VERY high (127) so your final result is unstable.

In this modified code I've generated my own noisy meanValues which would be best fit using a second order fit. Yet the order value is set to 4 so you will find that the third and fourth order coefficients in v are very small compared to the 0th, 1st and 2nd coefficients.

At least for my generated data you should be able to verify that the MSE between y and P for the 2nd order fit is lower than a 4th order fit. There doesn't seem to be much of a trend in your data so you would do best to test a few different orders and take the one with the lowest MSE. That's not to say it correctly models the system that produced your data, so be careful.

clear all;
meanValues = (1:127)/25;
meanValues(:) = meanValues(:).^2;
for i = 1:length(meanValues)
    meanValues(i) = meanValues(i) + rand(1,1)*4;
end

x=(1:length(meanValues));
y=meanValues(:);

Order = 4;
A(:,1) = ones(127,1);
for j = 1:Order
    A(:,j+1) = (x'.^j);
end
%   A=fliplr(vander(x));
v=A \ y;
P(1: length(x))=0;
for i=1: length(x)
    for j=1: length(v)
        P(i)=P(i)+v(j)*x(i).^(j-1);
    end
end
plot(x,y,'r*');
hold on;
plot(x, P);

EDIT: This version computes MSE and finds the minimum order. Only takes 0.324198 seconds to check up to 100th order fit. Maybe there is some advantage to using polyfit... I'm not sure.

clear all;
meanValues = (1:127)/25;
meanValues(:) = meanValues(:).^2;
for i = 1:length(meanValues)
    meanValues(i) = meanValues(i) + rand(1,1)*4;
end

x=(1:length(meanValues));
y=meanValues(:);
tic
minMSE = Inf;
nOrder = 100;
for Order = 1:nOrder

    A(:,1) = ones(127,1);
    for j = 1:Order
        A(:,j+1) = (x'.^j);
    end
    %   A=fliplr(vander(x));
    v=A \ y;
    P = zeros(1,length(x));
    for i=1: length(x)
        for j=1: length(v)
            P(i)=P(i)+v(j)*x(i).^(j-1);
        end
    end
   P = P';
    newMSE = norm(P-y);
    if (newMSE < minMSE)
        minMSE = newMSE;
        minOrder = Order;
        minP = P';
    end
end

toc
plot(x,y,'r*');
hold on;
plot(x, minP);
minMSE
minOrder
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer, I have updated my question. –  user755974 Nov 22 '13 at 20:20
    
I don't have polyfit function so I'm not sure what else it is doing for you, but 1s per fit seems like an awfully long time. With the manually written fit it only takes 0.002259 seconds for the 4th order fit. Even a 100th order fit is only 0.009741 seconds. –  Falimond Nov 22 '13 at 20:40
    
Falimond, this approach is not good - the minimum order will always be 6 - right? Polynomial regressions with Order > 6 and N > 100 cause this kind of trouble. Now, I am not sure what the user is after - it seems that they intend to find the minimum order exact polynomial that fits all the points perfectly. They will have to do it symbolically - I don't see any other alternative. –  randomatlabuser Nov 22 '13 at 22:01
    
I'm not sure why the 6th order fit would always provide the lowest MSE for any and all data (not just my meanValues data). What is the reasoning behind this? Maybe for the specific meanValues that I have generated, yes 6th order seems to provide the minimum, but this is just a consequence of the random noise that was added to the perfect model [meanValues(:) = meanValues(:).^2;]. Generally speaking, and it depends on the application or reason for doing a fit, an exact polynomial fit to each point is in fact "over" fitting and not really useful. –  Falimond Nov 22 '13 at 23:23
    
For a perfect fit to all points the order number should be one less than the number of points (or maybe exactly equal). But it is true that my method won't result in a perfect fit, so maybe I am forgetting something else about fitting to each point exactly. Although this method does give you least MSE fit. –  Falimond Nov 22 '13 at 23:46

This code works OK:

% Data and regression
y = cumsum(randn(100, 1));
x=(1:length(y));
x = x(:);
A=fliplr(vander(x));
A = A(:, 1:7);
v=A \ y;

% Calculate P your way
P(length(x))=0;
for i=1: length(x)
  for j=1: length(v)
    P(i)=P(i)+v(j)*x(i).^(j-1);
  end
end

% Calculate P by vectorization
Q = A * v;

% P and Q should be the same - they are!
tmp = P - Q';
plot(tmp, '.')

% Plot data and fitted data
figure
plot(x,y,'r*');
hold on;
plot(x, P, '-b');
plot(x, Q, '-g');

This regression is equivalent to

p = fliplr(polyfit(x,y,6))';

which returns a warning

Warning: Polynomial is badly conditioned. Add points with distinct X
         values, reduce the degree of the polynomial, or try centering
         and scaling as described in HELP POLYFIT. 

If you try this

A=fliplr(vander(x));
A = A(:, 1:8);
v=A \ y;

it returns a warning:

Warning: Rank deficient, rank = 7,  tol =   5.9491e+000. 

because A(end) is 1.0000e+014.

So, you see, regressions with polynomials are nasty methods. You have to find another way.

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