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I'm using backbone 1.1 and trying to create a collection from a 3-5 level deep tree-navigation.

A simplified version of my code looks like this.

var treeItem = Backbone.Model.extend({
    defaults : {
        'label'     : '',
        'children'  : null
    },
    initialize : function() {
        console.log('model init');
        if (_.isArray(this.get('children'))) {
            this.set({children : new treeItemCollection(this.get('children'))});
        }
    },
});

var treeItemCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    model: treeItem
});

var myTree = new treeItemCollection([
    { "label" : "first", "id": 1 },
    { "label" : "second", "id": 1, "children":
        [
            { "label" : "second.first", "id" : 21 },
            { "label" : "second.second", "id" : 22 },
            { "label" : "second.third", "id" : 22, "children" : [
                { "label" : "third.first", "id" : 31 },
                { "label" : "third.second", "id" : 32 }
            ] }
        ]
    }
]);

In my understanding this should create the deeper level child-collections correctly (as to my understanding, initialize should be called when the object is constructed thus creating the deeper levels correctly).

For some reason this doesn't seem to be the case. The second level (eg. myTree.models[0].get('children') is correctly a collection of the treeCollection type, but the 3rd level (myTree.models[0].get('children').models[0].get('children')) is just straight up JSON from the parameter object.

To me that's the weirdest part, that the second level is ok, but the third is not. The console.log in initialize() is to check, and quite right, it gets triggered 4 times, not 6.

I'm trying to understand why the 3rd level doesn't get converted to a collection.

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btw, your example works for me for some reason. except you have duplicated IDs in the json. I wonder if that's causing problems. –  Yurui Ray Zhang Nov 22 '13 at 20:33
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can overwrite the parse function in the model to do this.

var treeItem = Backbone.Model.extend({
  defaults : {
    'label'     : '',
    'children'  : null
  },
  initialize : function() {
    console.log('model init');
  },

  parse: function(response) {
    if (response["children"]) {
       response["children"] = new treeItemCollection(response["children"]);
    }
    return response;
  }
});

this way, each time when you do fetch() or save(), it will automatically wrap your children (and their nested children, if exists) in treeItemCollection.

But this does not work when you bootstrap your data, or you are just using reset(). so you may want to overwrite the constructor method as well:

var treeItem = Backbone.Model.extend({
  //other stuff shown above

  constructor: function(attributes, options){
    options = options || {};
    options.parse = true;
    Backbone.Model.call(this, attributes, options);
  }
});

and it should work for your case.

We have used this pattern in many projects and we loved it. If you wanna apply it to all models/collections, and be more flexible, you probably wanna read this: http://www.devmynd.com/blog/2013-6-backbone-js-with-a-spine-part-2-models-and-collections

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this proved useful. I ended up using essentially the same pattern. –  Marcus Nov 25 '13 at 13:55
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