Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I asked a question earlier today, but I think I need to approach it in a different way (on top of that there was a "hang up" in regards to DataSet).

Here's a class that encapsulates the creation of a Font (in other words, it is reading data from an xml file and is creating a font, at runtime, based on what it reads from that file):

public class FontCreator
{
    private Font m_TheFont = null;

    public FontCreator( ... some parameters ... )
    {
        m_TheFont = GetTheFont();
    }

    public Font TheFont
    {
        return m_TheFont;
    }

    private Font GetTheFont()
    {
        // code, and more code, that eventually leads to:

        Font f = new Font(fntFamily, fntSize, fntStyle);
        return f;
    }
}

The consumer of the FontCreator class looks something like:

public class TheConsumer()
{
    private FontCreator m_FontCreator = null;

    public TheConsumer()
    {
        m_FontCreator = new m_FontCreator( ... some parameters ... );
        Initialize();
    }

    private void Initialize()
    {
        InitializeThis();
        InitializeThat();
    }

    private void InitializeThis()
    {
        .... some code ...
        SomeObject.ApplyFont(m_FontCreator.TheFont);
    }

    private void InitializeThat()
    {
        ... some code ...
        SomeObject.ApplyFont(m_FontCreator.TheFont);
    }
}

What code do you add, and where, to ensure that "TheFont"'s Dispose method is explicitly called?

share|improve this question
    
first ask yourself why you need to dispose of a Font, what is the purpose of your dispose? are there important resources you are trying to free up? .. it seems your questions are trying to dispose things just for the heck of disposing them. –  Stan R. Jan 6 '10 at 19:00
    
@Stan R: Wait, what!? From this msdn link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yh598w02.aspx –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 19:19
    
@Stan R (con't): a) "File and Font are examples of managed types that access unmanaged resources". b) "As a rule, when you use an IDisposable object, you should declare and instantiate it in a using statement. The using statement calls the Dispose method on the object in the correct way, and (when you use it as shown earlier) it also causes the object itself to go out of scope as soon as Dispose is called" –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 19:20
    
@Stan R (con't): In other words, disposin'g of a Font is a good practice. Not "disposing things just for the heck of disposing them". I'm really trying to figure out what issue people have with trying to dispose objects that are IDisposable. –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 19:22
    
I think you have it absolutely right. There are known cases where IDisposable is implemented where it's not needed and doesn't do much good. If you have specific knowledge of an object's Dispose method not being needed, then I guess it's fine to not call it. But, calling it every single time is a great habit. And I'm someone who is usually against blindly doing a certain practice all the time. In the case of Dispose/Using, there's just no downside, only safety. –  Patrick Karcher Feb 26 '10 at 15:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you don't wish to maintain a reference to TheFont after it is initially used, then call it's Dispose method in your constructor, right after Initialize. If you wish to keep TheConsumer alive for a while and maintain a reference to TheFont, it gets more interesting. Two Options:

  1. You can have TheFont's dispose method called from the Destructor of the TheConsumer object. This is not the common practice and has problems. Mainly, this is not called until garbage collection happens. Better is:
  2. You can make the TheConsumer object itself implement IDisposable, and call TheFont.Dispose from TheConsumer.Dispose. Since TheConsumer implements IDisposable, the code that uses it should call its Dispose method.

Edit in response to harsh comment! Yes, I should have made clear to only use 1 in addition to 2, if at all. I know all developers everywhere are supposed to notice when IDisposable is implemented, but they often don't. If the referenced managed resource might really remain around a long time and cause problems if not properly disposed, I sometimes have a safety Dispose() method call in the destructor of the object holding the reference. Is that so wrong? :)

share|improve this answer
    
Henk could you elaborate? –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 19:45
    
@Henk: One more follow-up: Let's say I implement IDisposable on FontCreator, but I have no Finalizer. In my Dispose function I call: m_TheFont.Dispose(). Now, someone comes along, they use FontCreator, but don't use a "using" or call Dispose on the "TheFont" getter. In addition, they don't call Dispose on FontCreator. Therefore, m_TheFont.Dispose() is never called. Didn't we just leak the unmanaged memory that m_TheFont was using? Even though we are one level removed? –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 20:29
1  
@Henk: Dispose() is not called by GC, right? Now, making the GC deal with a finalizer method has overhead (and can make object stay around longer), but might it not be worth it to make sure an important Dispose method gets called? To me it seems like a judgement call. Let's say an object BigShot is long-lived anyway, and has referenced to many LittleShot (implementing IDisposable) objects whose unmanaged resources are known to really need clean-up. Shouldn't we weigh creating a BigShot finalizer against making sure all those resources are cleaned up? It seems like a judgement call to me. –  Patrick Karcher Jan 6 '10 at 20:52
    
@PatrickKarcher: Just about the only cases I know of where I would consider it reasonably proper to use a finalizer are those where a logically-immutable instance of an object requires resources, and many other objects are expected to share that instance. In those cases, it may be necessary to avoid releasing the resource until nobody's using the instance any more, but there may be no practical way for the last entity with a reference to know that it's the last entity with a reference. If the resources in question are fungible and not too expensive... –  supercat Dec 5 '13 at 17:39
    
...it may make sense to use a cache of weak references to sharable instances, and let those instances' finalizers take care of cleanup. Note that in this scenario, the number of abandoned objects that would exist would be bounded to the number of different instances that had been needed since the last garbage collection--a guarantee that does not exist in most cases where finalizable objects are abandoned. –  supercat Dec 5 '13 at 17:42
public TheConsumer()
{
    using (m_FontCreator = new m_FontCreator( ... some parameters ... ))
    {
        Initialize();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So what you are saying is that I should modify the "FontCreator" class to be IDisposable? Because your code won't compile unless I do that. If that's the case (make FontCreator IDisposable), can I see how you would do that? Thx. –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 18:52
1  
FontCreator doesn't implement IDisposable... –  Meta-Knight Jan 6 '10 at 18:52
2  
you made a typo- it should be new FontCreater :) –  Stan R. Jan 6 '10 at 18:59
1  
public class FontCreator : IDisposable { ... } Stan: The spelling is correct. :) –  Neil T. Jan 6 '10 at 19:08
1  
@Neil. using (m_FontCreator = new m_FontCreator( ... some parameters ... )) ..is incorrect :P –  Stan R. Jan 6 '10 at 19:13

I am confused, if you want to quickly use the font creater object then implement IDisposable on the FontCreater and use

using(m_FontCreator = new FontCreater(....))
{
   InitializeThis();
   InitializeThat();
}

If you need to keep the instance of the FontCreater through the lifetime of TheConsumer, then implement IDisposable on both FontCreater and TheConsumer classes.

public class TheConsumer : IDisposable
{
  void Dispose()
  {
     if(m_FontCreator != null)
          m_FontCreator.Dispose();
  }
}

then use TheConsumer class like so

using(TheConsumer consumer = new TheConsumer(....))
{
  ....
}
share|improve this answer

Answer 1: Avoid it. Don't keep objectsthat contain unmanaged resources around any longer than necessary.

Answer 2: If you do need the embedded fields as shown in your code, than both the FontCreator and the Consumer class need to implement IDisposable. But not a destructor (Finalizer).
The main argument for this is that FontCreator is the 'owner' of the Font and should therefore take responsibility. And the Consumer is responsible for the Creator in the same way.

As others have noted, it appears you can at least avoid the m_FontCreator field in the Consumer class. But it depends on the rest of the code, is m_FontCreator used elsewhere?

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I agree. 1) But, in the situation above, how do I avoid it? 2) More importantly, why no Finalizer? According to msdn: "Note that even when you provide explicit control by way of Dispose, you should provide implicit cleanup using the Finalize method. Finalize provides a backup to prevent resources from permanently leaking if the programmer fails to call Dispose" This is the link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1yfkh5e(VS.71).aspx –  JustLooking Jan 6 '10 at 19:43
1  
Re the finalizer: if you go through the code you will see that the disposing parameter ensures the finalizer does nothing when there are no unmanaged resources. Better to leave it out, there is a considerable cost. The text applies to objects with unmanaged resources, like Font. –  Henk Holterman Jan 6 '10 at 20:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.