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I am All Programmer when it comes to anything including flash. I got into making games not to long ago and some people use frames to navigate from the main menu to the game screen and so on (which I have no idea how to do). and some people encapsulate the game inside of a class and call it from the document class and add and remove it when please.

I am just curious of what is the best practices when it comes to this and what is most beneficial. What do the pros do.

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it's possible to assign a label to frame and use gotoAndPlay(frameNum or label) –  oldUser Jan 6 '10 at 19:14

4 Answers 4

Using the timeline is generally regarded as not best practise. You will tend to find designers who start programming tend to use the timeline a lot as thats what they are used to. Also programmers who started off with AS1 or AS2 tend to have bad habbits. If something is worth doing its worth doing properly.

The problem with using the timeline is managing your variable states. Any variables that are declared in a frame will be lost if you then move to another frame (except for the first frame). To demonstrate imagine this basic example:

On the first frame there is an options button that when clicked goes to another frame "options". This options frame has a check button and also declares another object. It also has a button to return to the main menu. This is what it looks like when the compiler has generated it into code:

package DemoAvoid_fla
{
    import fl.controls.*;
    import flash.display.*;
    import flash.events.*;

    dynamic public class MainTimeline extends MovieClip
    {
        public var btnOptions:SimpleButton;
        public var chkHints:CheckBox;
        public var myWorld:Object;
        public var btnReturnToMainMenu:SimpleButton;
        public var declareSomeInstace:Object;

        public function MainTimeline()
        {
            addFrameScript(0, this.frame1, 1, this.frame2);
            return;
        }// end function

        public function onOptionsClick(event:MouseEvent) : void
        {
            gotoAndStop("options");
            return;
        }// end function

        function frame1()
        {
            stop();
            this.myWorld = new Object();
            this.btnOptions.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, this.onOptionsClick);
            return;
        }// end function

        public function onReturnToMainMenu(event:Event) : void
        {
            gotoAndStop("mainMenu");
            return;
        }// end function

        function frame2()
        {
            stop();
            this.chkHints.addEventListener(Event.CHANGE, this.onHintsChange);
            this.btnReturnToMainMenu.addEventListene(MouseEvent.CLICK,this.onReturnToMainMenu);
            this.declareSomeInstace = new Object();
            return;
        }// end function

        public function onHintsChange(event:Event) : void
        {
            var _loc_2:* = event.target.selected;
            trace(_loc_2);
            return;
        }// end function

    }
}

Now this is where the problem lies. If you were to navigate to the options page then return to the main menu you would end up resetting your variable state as you now create a new instance of my world (and memory usuage goes up as the garbage collector won't be instant). You have now also lost your instance in your options page.

My coding style for menus is to create each screen as a movieclip. Then place each movieclip on the first frame but on different layers. I then hide/show the layer I want. Its also easy to control from external classes and just as quick to design and avoids any of the pitfalls that I mentioned :)

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Well I feel more relieved. I didnt intend on using the timeLine anyhow. But still the biggest challenge programming is managing all those display objects. not only do you have to manually remove them all. but you must also make sure all event listeners are destroy as well. I just started actionscript, so I am learning everything. but still trying to get into habit of that. and the best practices for grouping display objects to be destroy along with listeners –  numerical25 Jan 7 '10 at 13:26
2  
It's pretty interesting how Flash, which has its roots firmly in the frame metaphor after all, has become little more than a vessel for ActionScript to speak to graphical objects. (If that). Pretty much all AS devs I know, myself included, try to spend as little time as possible in the Flash IDE and will rather work with pure ActionScript projects and import graphic assets at runtime. Just a fleeting bemusement. :) –  Martin Jan 12 '10 at 22:54
    
It certainly is :). I am now finding I am avoiding even using Adobe's compiler and writing AS3 in another language. –  Allan Jan 12 '10 at 23:52

If you start with Flash, just the IDE and then learn how to code, navigating through frames makes sense as it's dead easy to understand/implement.

The only advantage I can think of is that objects are always there, so when you're going from one frame to another, once the objects are instantiated, they'll be there for you, so no need to remove everything, add everything again.

I'm guessing pros like Keith Peters code there views and menus 100%. Once you make your nice little game engine ( with menus and screens) ready to be reused (Asobu), the timeline seems a bit pointless for switching views. The PushButtonEngine looks great from this perspective.

If you're working with a designer, and he/she is designing the screens and the timeline navigation makes more sense for him/her while prototyping, I'm guessing there is a middle ground. As long as each screen is a MovieClip on it's own, inside the main timeline, you can set a Class for each screen MovieClip and carry on from there. If you need something to declare stage instances for you, I wrote a tiny extension that could give hand with that. Then you can carry on with the logic in your preffered IDE.

My guess is for quick additive button bashing short indy games the timeline will do just fine. If you're planning to reuse a basic engine and make more complex games, on the long run, actionscript will prove the right decision. Basic rule of thumb: Don't over complicate things without reason.

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My code isnt that complex, but I see what your saying. I might as well stick with whats best for me. Coding. thanks –  numerical25 Jan 6 '10 at 20:45
    
Yup, there are many ways of doing the same thing. Do whatever makes you feel comfortable and have fun. Glad I could help :) –  George Profenza Jan 7 '10 at 0:07

I think it's a real shame that using the timeline is regarded as not best practice. I feel this is largely Adobe's fault, for not providing documentation of how to use the timeline in accordence with good development practice when AS3/CS3 came out.

If you use the timeline you have a lot more choices about things like when your embedded objects get loaded, which means that you don't have to download so much code before the movie will start--so you don't have that long preloader to advertise that you're such a coding ninja you embed everything before frame 1. Because of course users are much happier when they know that they are viewing something created by a coding ninja, so they're willing to wait for the privelege.

You might find this alternative perspective interesting http://www.developria.com/2010/04/combining-the-timeline-with-oo.html

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Personally I tend towards only using the Flash IDE for creating asset SWC files. All my logic and compilation is done using FDT. Compilation time is much faster and the debugger works.

The main exception to this is banners, because most ad serving companies use Flash extensions to communicate with their back end, and so working in the IDE is required. Also, with banners a designer does most of the work, and I only really get involved when it comes time to tie in more complex interactions that cannot be done on the timeline.

Bottom line: work however you're comfortable when you can, but be capable of working however you are required to.

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