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I have a parent Python script that launches a child (which launches grandchildren), and after some time, I terminate the child, but the grandchildren continue to pump to stdout. After I kill the child, I want to suppress/redirect the stdout and stderr of the grandchildren (and all their descendants).

Here is the parent:

import time
import subprocess
proc = subprocess.Popen('./child.sh')
print("Dad: I have begotten a son!")
time.sleep(1)
proc.kill()
proc.wait()
print("Dad: My son hath died!")
time.sleep(2)
print("Dad: Why does my grandson still speak?")

Here is the child script which I cannot modify.

#!/bin/bash
./grandchild.sh &
echo "Child: I had a son!"
for (( i = 0; i < 10; i++ )); do
    echo "Child: Hi Dad, meet your grandson!"
    sleep 1
done
exit 0

Here is a noisy grandchild which I cannot modify.

#!/bin/bash
for (( i = 0; i < 10; i++ )); do
    echo "Grandchild: Wahhh"
    sleep 1
done
exit 0

I tried doing this right before killing the child:

import os
f = open(os.devnull,"w")
proc.stdout = proc.stderr = f

But it doesn't seem to work. The output is:

> ./parent.py
Dad: I have begotten a son!
Child: I had a son!
Child: Hi Dad, meet your grandson!
Grandchild: Wahhh
Dad: My son hath died!
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
Dad: My grandson still speaketh!
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
Grandchild: Wahhh
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you invoke subprocess.Popen you can tell it to redirect stdout and/or stderr. If you don't, it leaves them un-redirected by allowing the OS to copy from the Python process's actual STDOUT_FILENO and STDERR_FILENO (which are fixed constants, 1 and 2).

This means that if Python's fd 1 and 2 are going to your tty session (perhaps on an underlying device like /dev/pts/0 for instance), the child—and with this case, consequently, the grandchild as well—are talking directly to the same session (the same /dev/pts/0). Nothing you do in the Python process itself can change this: those are independent processes with independent, direct access to the session.

What you can do is invoke ./child.sh with redirection in place:

proc = subprocess.Popen('./child.sh', stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

Quick side-note edit: if you want to discard all output from the child and its grandchildren, open os.devnull (either as you did, or with os.open() to get a raw integer file descriptor) and connect stdout and stderr to the underlying file descriptor. If you have opened it as a Python stream:

f = open(os.devnull, "w")

then the underlying file descriptor is f.fileno():

proc = subprocess.Popen('./child.sh', stdout=f.fileno(), stderr=f.fileno())

In this case you cannot get any output from any of the processes involved.


Now file descriptor 1 in the child is connected to a pipe-entity, rather than directly to the session. (Since there is no stderr= above, fd 2 in the child is still connected directly to the session.)

The pipe-entity, which lives inside the operating system, simply copies from one end (the "write end" of the pipe) to the other (the "read end"). Your Python process has control of the read-end. You must invoke the OS read system call—often not directly, but see below—on that read end, to collect the output from it.

In general, if you stop reading from your read-end, the pipe "fills up" and any process attempting an OS-level write on the write-end is "blocked" until someone with access to the read end (that's you, again) reads from it.

If you discard the read-end, leaving the pipe with nowhere to dump its output, the write end starts returning EPIPE errors and sending SIGPIPE signals, to any process attempting an OS-level write call. This kind of discard occurs when you call the OS-level close system call, assuming you have not handed the descriptor off to some other process(es). It also occurs when your process exits (under the same assumption, again).

There is no convenient method by which you can connect the read-end to an infinite data sink like /dev/null, at least in most Unix-like systems (there are a few with some special funky system calls to do this kind of "plumbing"). But if you plan to kill the child and are willing to let its grandchildren die from SIGPIPE signals, you can simply close the descriptor (or exit) and let the chips fall where they may.

Children and grandchildren can protect themselves from dying by setting SIGPIPE to SIG_IGN, or by blocking SIGPIPE. Signal masks are inherited across exec system calls so in some cases, you can block SIGPIPE for children (but some children will unblock signals).

If closing the descriptor is not suitable, you can create a new process that simply reads and discards incoming pipe data. If you use the fork system call, this is trivial. Alternatively some Unix-like systems allow you to pass file descriptors through AF_UNIX sockets to otherwise-unrelated (parent/child-wise) processes, so you could have a daemon that does this, reachable via an AF_UNIX socket. (This is nontrivial to code.)

If you wish the child process to send its stderr output to the same pipe, so that you can read both its stdout and its stderr, simply add stderr=subprocess.STDOUT to the Popen() call. If you wish the child process to send its stderr output to a separate pipe, add stderr=subprocess.PIPE. If you do the latter, however, things can get a bit tricky.

To prevent children from blocking, as noted above, you must invoke the OS read call. If there is only one pipe this is easy:

for line in proc.stdout:
    ...

for instance, or:

line = proc.stdout.readline()

will read the pipe one line at a time (modulo buffering inside Python). You can read as many or as few lines as you like.

If there are two pipes, though, you must read whichever one(s) is/are "full". Python's subprocess module defines the communicate() function to do this for you:

stdout, stderr = proc.communicate()

The drawback here is that communicate() reads to completion: it needs to get all output that can go to the write end of each pipe. This means it repeatedly calls the OS-level read operation until read indicates end-of-data. That occurs only when all processes that had, at some point, write access to the write end of the corresponding pipe, have closed that end of the pipe. In other words, it waits for the child and any grandchildren to close the descriptors connected to the write end of the pipe(s).

In general it's much simpler to use only one pipe, read as much (but only as much) as you like, then simply close the pipe:

proc = subprocess.Popen('./child.sh', stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
line1 = proc.stdout.readline()
line2 = proc.stdout.readline()
# that's all we care about
proc.stdout.close()
proc.kill()
status = proc.wait()

Whether this suffices depends on your particular problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I was able to solve the problem with your final code block, but I also greatly appreciate all the details. – supergra Nov 22 '13 at 23:31
    
Indeed, I don't care how gracefully the grandchildren die, just that they don't clutter the output stream. This works perfectly. Slightly less convenient, because you have to handle the stream manually, but I figured that is what it might take. – supergra Nov 22 '13 at 23:32

Right now, your subprocess is allowed to communicate with your terminal via STDOUT and STDERR. Instead, you can hijack this data from the subprocess like so:

import subprocess
cmd = ['./child.sh']
process = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)

This redirects all STDERR output of your child to the normal STDOUT channel, then redirects the normal STDOUT output of your child to your python script, via a PIPE. You can now read from that PIPE using line = process.stdout.readline(), which grabs a single line of output. You can print that back to STDOUT with print(line).

Once you kill your son (gasp), stop all output from your subprocess.

For a more information on subprocess, see one of my previous answers which are similar to this: python subprocess.call output is not interleaved

share|improve this answer

If you don't care about the grandchildren; you could kill them all:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import os
import signal
import subprocess
import sys
import time

proc = subprocess.Popen('./child.sh', start_new_session=True)
print("Dad: I have begotten a son!")
time.sleep(1)
print("Dad: kill'em all!")
os.killpg(proc.pid, signal.SIGKILL)

for msg in "dead... silence... crickets... chirping...".split():
    time.sleep(1)
    print(msg, end=' ', flush=True)

You can emulate start_new_session=True on old Python versions using preexec_fn=os.setsid. See Best way to kill all child processes.

You can collect children's output before the killing:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import collections
import os
import signal
import threading
from subprocess import Popen, PIPE, STDOUT

def killall(proc):
    print "Dad: kill'em all!"
    os.killpg(proc.pid, signal.SIGKILL)
    proc.wait()

proc = Popen('./child.sh', stdout=PIPE, stderr=STDOUT, preexec_fn=os.setsid)
print("Dad: I have begotten a son!")

# kill in a second
hitman = threading.Timer(1, killall, [proc])
hitman.start()

# save last 200 lines of output
q = collections.deque(proc.stdout, maxlen=200)
hitman.cancel()
proc.wait()

# print collected output
print '*'*60
print ''.join(q).decode('ascii'),
print '*'*60

See Stop reading process output in Python without hang?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. Actually killing all the grandchildren silently is even better than simply silencing them. – supergra Nov 25 '13 at 19:27
    
"If you don't care about the grandchildren; you could kill them all" Fortunately, we are in a programming forum... – antoine Jul 28 '15 at 18:38

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