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I am designing a Javascript-based Ohms law calculator (voltage, resistance, current) using knockout.js.

I want the ability of the user being able to select what is calculated, , e.g. voltage, resistance, or current, given the other two parameters, via radio buttons.

So my question is, can you change a ko.observable into a ko.computed and vise versa, after ko.applyBindings() has been called?

My initial attempts say no, I have tried this and slaved over the non-working code for hours, trying to get it to work.

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What is a ko.calculated? –  PW Kad Nov 22 '13 at 23:00
    
Sorry, I meant ko.computed. I have updated the question to reflect this. –  gbmhunter Nov 22 '13 at 23:40
    
Why would you want to switch them? –  PW Kad Nov 23 '13 at 0:08
    
As per above, I want the user to be able to select which variable is calculated (which make it the computed and the other two observables). Ohms law can be V=IR, I=V/R or R=V/I. –  gbmhunter Nov 23 '13 at 0:22
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't do it that way, but you can make all of them read/write ko.computeds that store a "shadow" value when written to and return that value when read from if they aren't the selected quantity (and return a calculated value if they aren't)

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Would I be able to change the ko.computed's 'compute' function? If not, I may have to look for another framework. –  gbmhunter Nov 22 '13 at 23:39

You dont even need a writable computed for this like ebohlman suggests

A simple demo

http://jsfiddle.net/K8t7b/

ViewModel = function() {
    this.selected = ko.observable("1");
    this.valueOne = ko.observable(1);
    this.valueTwo = ko.observable(5);

    this.result = ko.computed(this.getResult, this);    
}

ViewModel.prototype = {
    getResult: function() {
        if(this.selected() === "1") {
            return this.valueOne() - this.valueTwo();
        }

        return this.valueOne() + this.valueTwo();
    }
};

ko.applyBindings(new ViewModel());

edit: hm, if you want the result to be presented in the correct value textbox you need to make them writable computed like ebohlman suggets

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I don't this is changing a observable into a computed and vise versa, but rather just changing the calculation formula. See my answer below... –  gbmhunter Nov 23 '13 at 21:45

As ebohlman mentioned, the vital thing I was missing was shadow-variables, and the use of separate read/write procedures (a recently added feature to knockout) for ko.computed.

The code for one of the three variables is:

this.voltageS = ko.observable();

this.voltage = ko.computed({
    read: function () {
        if(this.calcWhat() == 'voltage')
        {
            console.log('Calculating voltage');
            if(this.currentS == null)
                return;
            if(this.resistanceS == null)
                return;
            this.voltageS(this.currentS()*this.resistanceS());
            return(this.currentS()*this.resistanceS());
        }
        else
        {
            console.log('Reading from voltage');
            return this.voltageS();
        }
    },
    write: function (value) {
        console.log('Writing to voltage');
        this.voltageS(value)
    },
    owner: this
});

I have created a JSFiddle here, which demonstrates being able to switch between which variable is calculated.

Another key part to this code is that on read, if it did happen to be the selected variable, as well as calculating it from the other two, I also had to write this result back to the shadow variable. This preventing some of the variables from mysteriously dissapearing/reappearing when the selected variable was changed.

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