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Is there an easy way in C# to create Ordinals for a number? For example:

  • 1 returns 1st
  • 2 returns 2nd
  • 3 returns 3rd
  • ...etc

Can this be done through String.Format() or are there any functions available to do this?

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9 Answers

up vote 159 down vote accepted

This page gives you a complete listing of all custom numerical formatting rules:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0c899ak8.aspx

As you can see, there is nothing in there about ordinals, so it can't be done using String.Format. However its not really that hard to write a function to do it.

public static string AddOrdinal(int num)
{
    if( num <= 0 ) return num.ToString();

    switch(num % 100)
    {
        case 11:
        case 12:
        case 13:
            return num + "th";
    }

    switch(num % 10)
    {
        case 1:
            return num + "st";
        case 2:
            return num + "nd";
        case 3:
            return num + "rd";
        default:
            return num + "th";
    }

}

Update: Technically Ordinals don't exist for <= 0, so I've updated the code above. Also removed the redundant ToString() methods.

Also note, this is not internationalised. I've no idea what ordinals look like in other languages.

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2  
Assert.AreEqual("0", AddOrdinal(0)); See wisegeek.com/what-is-an-ordinal-number.htm –  Si. Mar 6 '09 at 21:36
2  
Using an extention method (or whatever it's called -- see @Stu's answer) would work great here. @Si, Adding that condition would be very easy if it is required. –  strager Mar 6 '09 at 21:44
1  
If I made it an extension method I would call it "ToOrdinalString". –  samjudson Mar 19 '09 at 15:55
5  
Forgot about '11th, 12th 13th'... should be an interview question. :-) –  Holf Mar 13 '12 at 16:10
    
Nice answer. As a note, the .ToString() calls are redundant, removing these improves readability (slightly) –  Dylan Hogg Aug 20 '13 at 0:05
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Remember internationalisation!

The solutions here only work for English. Things get a lot more complex if you need to support other languages.

For example, in Spanish "1st" would be written as "1.o", "1.a", "1.os" or "1.as" depending on whether the thing you're counting is masculine, feminine or plural!

So if your software needs to support different languages, try to avoid ordinals.

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3  
Excellent point, and very easy to forget. –  Electrons_Ahoy Mar 6 '09 at 20:22
2  
How can 1st be plural? –  Andomar Apr 29 '09 at 17:34
3  
@ Andomar: "The first 2 readers" => in Italian (and Spanish too, I suppose) "first" is plural here. So you have singular masculine, singulare feminine, plural masculine, plural feminine; maybe some language has also a neutral case (distinguing things from men/animals) –  Turro Jun 9 '09 at 9:42
2  
That said, you don't have to avoid ordinals: include them in localization, once you know all the case you could face, or (make your customer) accept some limitations. –  Turro Jun 9 '09 at 9:44
14  
This explains why the .NET team steered clear of adding it to the DateTime formatters –  Chris S Apr 28 '10 at 23:08
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My version of Jesse's version of Stu's and samjudson's versions :)

Included unit test to show that the accepted answer is incorrect when number < 1

    /// <summary>
    /// Get the ordinal value of positive integers.
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// Only works for english-based cultures.
    /// Code from: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/20156/is-there-a-quick-way-to-create-ordinals-in-c/31066#31066
    /// With help: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-an-ordinal-number.htm
    /// </remarks>
    /// <param name="number">The number.</param>
    /// <returns>Ordinal value of positive integers, or <see cref="int.ToString"/> if less than 1.</returns>
    public static string Ordinal(this int number)
    {
        const string TH = "th";
        string s = number.ToString();

        // Negative and zero have no ordinal representation
        if (number < 1)
        {
            return s;
        }

        number %= 100;
        if ((number >= 11) && (number <= 13))
        {
            return s + TH;
        }

        switch (number % 10)
        {
            case 1: return s + "st";
            case 2: return s + "nd";
            case 3: return s + "rd";
            default: return s + TH;
        }
    }

    [Test]
    public void Ordinal_ReturnsExpectedResults()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("-1", (1-2).Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("0", 0.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("1st", 1.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("2nd", 2.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("3rd", 3.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("4th", 4.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("5th", 5.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("6th", 6.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("7th", 7.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("8th", 8.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("9th", 9.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("10th", 10.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("11th", 11.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("12th", 12.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("13th", 13.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("14th", 14.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("20th", 20.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("21st", 21.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("22nd", 22.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("23rd", 23.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("24th", 24.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("100th", 100.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("101st", 101.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("102nd", 102.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("103rd", 103.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("104th", 104.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("110th", 110.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("111th", 111.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("112th", 112.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("113th", 113.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("114th", 114.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("120th", 120.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("121st", 121.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("122nd", 122.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("123rd", 123.Ordinal());
        Assert.AreEqual("124th", 124.Ordinal());
    }
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While I haven't benchmarked this yet, you should be able to get better performance by avoiding all the conditional case statements.

This is java, but a port to C# is trivial:

public class NumberUtil {
  final static String[] ORDINAL_SUFFIXES = {
    "th", "st", "nd", "rd", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th"
  };

  public static String ordinalSuffix(int value) {
    int n = Math.abs(value);
    int lastTwoDigits = n % 100;
    int lastDigit = n % 10;
    int index = (lastTwoDigits >= 11 && lastTwoDigits <= 13) ? 0 : lastDigit;
    return ORDINAL_SUFFIXES[index];
  }

  public static String toOrdinal(int n) {
    return new StringBuffer().append(n).append(ordinalSuffix(n)).toString();
  }
}

Note, the reduction of conditionals and the use of the array lookup should speed up performance if generating a lot of ordinals in a tight loop. However, I also concede that this isn't as readable as the case statement solution.

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I rather liked elements from both Stu's and samjudson's solutions and worked them together into what I think is a usable combo:

    public static string Ordinal(this int number)
    {
        const string TH = "th";
        var s = number.ToString();

        number %= 100;

        if ((number >= 11) && (number <= 13))
        {
            return s + TH;
        }

        switch (number % 10)
        {
            case 1:
                return s + "st";
            case 2:
                return s + "nd";
            case 3:
                return s + "rd";
            default:
                return s + TH;
        }
    }
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what's the rationale behind using a constant for "th"? –  nickf Sep 17 '08 at 5:37
    
because it's used twice in the code. Just utilizing the age-old wisdom that you shouldn't repeat yourself :) In this case, the .NET runtime should only create one copy of the string while with two "th"s in the code, there'd be two strings created and referenced in memory. –  Jesse C. Slicer Sep 25 '08 at 16:24
15  
and also, if the value of TH ever changes, you'll be set. –  Eclipse Dec 27 '08 at 17:03
4  
@Jesse - You get my +1, but I don't believe .NET handles strings this way, see yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/strings.html#interning, my reading of that is each reference to the "th" literal would reference the same bit of memory. But I agree about DRY :) –  Si. Mar 6 '09 at 20:43
    
@Si - Rereading my last response, I'm reversing what I said and agree with your assessment. .NET is pretty darn smart when it comes to string handling and you have to go out of your way to make it work badly. –  Jesse C. Slicer Mar 7 '09 at 15:15
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You'll have to roll your own. From the top of my head:

public static string Ordinal(this int number)
{
  var work = number.ToString();
  if (number == 11 || number == 12 || number == 13)
    return work + "th";
  switch (number % 10)
  {
    case 1: work += "st"; break;
    case 2: work += "nd"; break;
    case 3: work += "rd"; break;
    default: work += "th"; break;
  }
  return work;
}

You can then do

Console.WriteLine(432.Ordinal());

Edited for 11/12/13 exceptions. I DID say from the top of my head :-)

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1  
This function doesn't work: Ordinal(1011) -> 1011st –  nickf Sep 17 '08 at 5:36
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Similar to Ryan's solution, but even more basic, I just use a plain array and use the day to look up the correct ordinal:

private string[] ordinals = new string[] {"","st","nd","rd","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","st","nd","rd","th","th","th","th","th","th","th","st" };
DateTime D = DateTime.Now;
String date = "Today's day is: "+ D.Day.ToString() + ordinals[D.Day];

I have not had the need, but I would assume you could use a multidimensional array if you wanted to have multiple language support.

From what I can remember from my Uni days, this method requires minimal effort from the server.

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public static string OrdinalSuffix(int ordinal)
{
    //Because negatives won't work with modular division as expected:
    var abs = Math.Abs(ordinal); 

    var lastdigit = abs % 10; 

    return 
        //Catch 60% of cases (to infinity) in the first conditional:
        lastdigit > 3 || lastdigit == 0 || (abs % 100) - lastdigit == 10 ? "th" 
            : lastdigit == 1 ? "st" 
            : lastdigit == 2 ? "nd" 
            : "rd";
}
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Another alternative that I used based on all the other suggestions, but requires no special casing:

    public static string DateSuffix(int day)
    {
        Math.DivRem(day, 10, out day);
        switch (day)
        {
            case 1:
                return "st";
            case 2:
                return "nd";
            case 3:
                return "rd";
            default:
                return "th";
        }
    }
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Fails for 11. –  CodesInChaos Jun 6 at 10:25
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