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I have a client connected to the server (TCP connection). In the case when server crashes (I disconnect it) my client needs to be connected to another server, in order to continue service. But when the first server comes back, I need to reconnect client to it again. I was able to connect my client to the back up server after the first server crashes, but I have a problem with reconnecting my client to the first server. I made a function create_newconnect() for reconnecting to the server, but it doesn't work (that is why I'm not calling it in the code) I tried to simplify my program as much as I could, so it wouldn't be to big This is a client side

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <time.h>
#define SIZE sizeof(struct sockaddr_in)


struct sockaddr_in server;
void tcp_protocol();//execute client tcp protocol
void server_check();
void tcp();
void create_newconnect();

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{

    int portno;

    //Test for correct number of arguments
    if (argc != 3)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage:  %s Port# IP Address \n", argv[0]);
        exit(1);
    }
    portno = atoi(argv[1]);//convert  port # to int
    server.sin_family = AF_INET;
    server.sin_port = htons(portno);
    server.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(argv[2]);//use client ip address
    tcp();//call tcp function
    return 0;
}
void tcp()
{
   int sockfd;
   char c ;
   //create socket
   if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0))==-1)
   {
       perror ("socket call faild");
       exit (1);
   }
   //connect to the server
   if (connect (sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&server, SIZE)==-1)
   {
       perror ("connect call faild");
       exit (1);
   }
   while(1)
   {
  printf("Enter char\n");
  scanf("%c",&c);
      server_check(sockfd);
      //send packet to server
      if (send(sockfd, &c, sizeof(c),0)<0)
      {
         printf("error sending\n");
      }
      //if packet is received from server
      if(recv(sockfd, &c, sizeof(c),0)>0)
      {
          printf("server's respond %c\n", c);//print result
      }
   }
close(sockfd);
}


void server_check(int sock)
{
    char b ='b';
    //send packet to server
    if (send(sock, &b, sizeof(b),0)<0)
        printf("error sending\n");
    //if packet is received from server
    if((recv(sock, &b, sizeof(b),0)>0))
    {
        printf("server responded\n");

    }
    else//if server is not responding
    {
    printf("server crashed\n");
        close(sock);//close socket
        server.sin_port = htons(5002);
        server.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("127.0.0.1");
        tcp();//create new connection
    }


}
void create_newconnect()
{
    int newsockfd;
    server.sin_port = htons(5001);
    //create socket
    if ((newsockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0))==-1)
    {
        perror ("socket call faild");
        exit (1);
    }
    //connect to the server
    if (connect (newsockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&server, SIZE)==-1)
    {
        perror ("connect call faild");
        exit (1);
    }
        tcp();//call function to execute tcp protocol

 }
share|improve this question
1  
It would be helpful to know what is not working for you and the diagnostics you see. I can see a number of problems in the code, but making it work against a test service I implemented may not address your issues. Does your real situation have the client and both the primary and backup server all residing on the same host, or is that an artifact of your test version? Are you wanting this test program fixed, or answers on how to solve the original problem of a client automatically failing between primary and backup servers? – gwaigh Nov 26 '13 at 3:21
up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

I think the first thing you're going to have to consider is: after your first server has crashed and your client has successfully reconnected to the backup server, how would your client ever know that that the first server has come back on line?

I can think of two possibilities: one might be that the backup server might notify the client about the re-appearance of the primary server (e.g. by sending some sort of PRIMARY_SERVER_ONLINE message over the TCP connection, or perhaps simply by closing the TCP connection, with the expectation that that would cause the client to try to connect to the primary server again).

The other approach would be to make your client smart enough that it can periodically (e.g. once per minute) try to reconnect to the primary server even while it is using the TCP connection to the backup server. That is doable, but not with a single thread and blocking I/O like your posted code has... (because if your program is blocked in a recv() call, there is no way for it to do anything else like try to connect a TCP connection). You'd need to either use non-blocking I/O and select() (or similar), or asynchronous I/O, or multiple threads, in order to do it properly.

share|improve this answer
1  
From a bandwidth perspective the first option is almost certainly better. That way only the backup server(s) are polling the primary server. Will your primary server be out of sync once it comes back up? If so it may need to talk to the backup before it restores service anyway. If not then are your servers basically stateless? If so why do you have a primary and a backup...they are just peers. In that case you should be trying to keep clients distributed between them for load reasons and to ease the strain when one fails. – Speed8ump Nov 26 '13 at 16:37
    
@JeremyFriesner I will try second approach, what I think is that I will try to connect to the main server before I send message to the back up server. Also can you elaborate more on blocking I/O that I have, I'm not really familiar with that. Thanks – swiftk Nov 27 '13 at 4:12
    
@swiftk sockets are created in blocking mode by default, which means that if they can't send/recv data at the moment send()/recv() is called, then the send()/recv() call will not return until there is some data sent/received (i.e. possibly not for a long time). If you'd rather have those calls never block (i.e. so your thread can do something else while you are waiting for the socket to become ready to send/recv), then you can set the socket to non-blocking mode after you create it, via fcntl(fd, F_SETFL, O_NONBLOCK); or under Windows it's unsigned long m=1; ioctlsocket(fd, FIONBIO, &m); – Jeremy Friesner Nov 27 '13 at 17:18

Your program recursively calls tcp() after reconnecting. This is almost certainly not correct and will result in resource (mainly stack) use on each disconnection.

You need to avoid having the code pass the socket file descriptor (sockfd) by value to the functions as it will change after each new connection.

As a general principle, you can have a list of (two or more) hosts in order of preference. Then, at all times attempt to create connections to those that have higher preference than the one you currently have a connection to. Then, when a connection is established, close all the other open sessions, and switch to the new preferred connection.

Keep this encapsulated and have it return the current active sockfd for use by all the other functions.

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