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I'm trying to understand fork, mkfifo and select.

I fork N children, each child writes his ID to the pipe, the parent reads the IDs from the pipe.

    int myPipe = mkfifo("pipe", S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR);
    if (myPipe < 0)
        perror("mkfifo: ");

    int n = 3;
    pid_t* pids = malloc(n * sizeof(pid_t));

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        pids[i] = fork();
        if (pids[i] < 0)
            perror("Fork: ");
    }

    fd_set fdMyPipe;
    FD_ZERO(&fdMyPipe);
    FD_SET(myPipe, &fdMyPipe);

    for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        if (pids[i] == 0) //child
        {
            printf("Child[%d] : I write my ID to the pipe.\n", i);
            write(myPipe, &i, sizeof(i));
        }
        else //parent
        {
            int j;
            for (j = 0; j < n; ++j)
            {   
                int r = select(myPipe + 1, &fdMyPipe, NULL, NULL, NULL);

                if (FD_ISSET(myPipe, &fdMyPipe))
                {
                    int child;
                    read(myPipe, &child, sizeof(&child));
                    printf("Parent : Child[%d]'s ID is %d.\n", child, child);
                }
            }
        }
    }

The output is the following:

Child[0] : I write my ID to the pipe.
Child[0] : I write my ID to the pipe.
Child[0] : I write my ID to the pipe.
Child[1] : I write my ID to the pipe.
Child[0] : I write my ID to the pipe.
Child[1] : I write my ID to the pipe.
Child[2] : I write my ID to the pipe.

I can't understand why there are 4 zeros, 2 ones and why they are mixed up.

Also, when I hit enter several times, I get the following:

Parent : Child[10]'s ID is 10.

Parent : Child[10]'s ID is 10.

Parent : Child[10]'s ID is 10.

Why the ID is 10, and why is it always ten?

EDIT

Now I get the correct number/order of children.

    for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        pids[i] = fork();
        if (pids[i] < 0)
            perror("Fork: ");

        if (pids[i] == 0) //child
        {
            printf("Child[%d] : I write my ID to the pipe.\n", i);
            write(myPipe, &i, sizeof(i));
            return;
        }
        else //parent
        {
            int j;
            for (j = 0; j < n; ++j)
            {   
                int r = select(myPipe + 1, &fdMyPipe, NULL, NULL, NULL);

                if (FD_ISSET(myPipe, &fdMyPipe))
                {
                    int child;
                    read(myPipe, &child, sizeof(child));
                    printf("Parent : Child[%d]'s ID is %d.\n", child, child);
                }
            }
        }
    }

However, the parent still reads some random ID.

Parent : Child[1426203146]'s ID is 1426203146.

Parent : Child[1426203146]'s ID is 1426203146.

share|improve this question
2  
You're forking inside of the loop, and child processes when i<n-1 are forking as well. –  Jordonias Nov 23 '13 at 9:27
1  
myPipe (the returned value of mkfifo()) is not a valid file descriptor. You need to open the named pipe separately to get valid file descriptors. Also, use _exit(EXIT_SUCCESS) instead of return in children. Add error handling. btw, you don't need mkfifo, select here pipe and read are enough. select would be useful if there were more than one pipe. mkfifo would be useful if you needed a filename for the pipe. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 24 '13 at 6:01
    
@j-f-sebestian Thank you, I didn't open the pipe.. :) –  otisonoza Nov 24 '13 at 6:39
    
I've updated the code to start reading ids before all children are forked using select to avoid blocking , and reap children automatically. It allows large number of child processes (I've tried with 100000 children ) –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 24 '13 at 16:11

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