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Say I have a task like:

for(Object object: objects) {
    Result result = compute(objects);
    list.add(result);
}

What is the easiest way to parallelize each compute() (assuming they are already parallelizable)?

I do not need an answer that matches strictly the code above, just a general answer. But if you need more info: my tasks are IO bound and this is for a Spring Web application and the tasks are going to be executed in a HTTP request.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I would recommend taking a look at ExecutorService.

In particular, something like this:

ExecutorService EXEC = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
List<Callable<Result>> tasks = new ArrayList<Callable<Result>>();
for (final Object object: objects) {
    Callable<Result> c = new Callable<Result>() {
        @Override
        public Result call() throws Exception {
            return compute(object);
        }
    };
    tasks.add(c);
}
List<Future<Result>> results = EXEC.invokeAll(tasks);

Note that using newCachedThreadPool could be bad if objects is a big list. A cached thread pool could create a thread per task! You may want to use newFixedThreadPool(n) where n is something reasonable (like the number of cores you have, assuming compute() is CPU bound).

Here's full code that actually runs:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;

public class ExecutorServiceExample {
    private static final Random PRNG = new Random();

    private static class Result {
        private final int wait;
        public Result(int code) {
            this.wait = code;
        }
    }

    public static Result compute(Object obj) throws InterruptedException {
        int wait = PRNG.nextInt(3000);
        Thread.sleep(wait);
        return new Result(wait);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException,
        ExecutionException {
        List<Object> objects = new ArrayList<Object>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            objects.add(new Object());
        }

        List<Callable<Result>> tasks = new ArrayList<Callable<Result>>();
        for (final Object object : objects) {
            Callable<Result> c = new Callable<Result>() {
                @Override
                public Result call() throws Exception {
                    return compute(object);
                }
            };
            tasks.add(c);
        }

        ExecutorService exec = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
        // some other exectuors you could try to see the different behaviours
        // ExecutorService exec = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);
        // ExecutorService exec = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
        try {
            long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
            List<Future<Result>> results = exec.invokeAll(tasks);
            int sum = 0;
            for (Future<Result> fr : results) {
                sum += fr.get().wait;
                System.out.println(String.format("Task waited %d ms",
                    fr.get().wait));
            }
            long elapsed = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
            System.out.println(String.format("Elapsed time: %d ms", elapsed));
            System.out.println(String.format("... but compute tasks waited for total of %d ms; speed-up of %.2fx", sum, sum / (elapsed * 1d)));
        } finally {
            exec.shutdown();
        }
    }
}
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Is there a c# version of this? –  Malfist Jan 6 '10 at 20:48
1  
Also look at Executors, which functions as a factory for various flavors of executor services. –  Rob H Jan 6 '10 at 20:49
    
@Malfist in C# there's tasks (well for the upcoming .net 4) that make all of these a breeze :). And there are delegates/lambdas and threads, funcs, threadstart, etc to do it in 3.5 –  Francisco Noriega Jan 16 '10 at 18:44

For a more detailed answer, read Java Concurrency in Practice and use java.util.concurrent.

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You can use the ThreadPoolExecutor. Here is sample code: http://programmingexamples.wikidot.com/threadpoolexecutor (too long to bring it here)

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Fork/Join's parallel array is one option

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One can simple create a few thread and get the result.

Thread t = new Mythread(object);

if (t.done()) {
   // get result
   // add result
}

EDIT : I think other solutions are cooler.

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Here's something I use in my own projects:

public class ParallelTasks
{
    private final Collection<Runnable> tasks = new ArrayList<Runnable>();

    public ParallelTasks()
    {
    }

    public void add(final Runnable task)
    {
        tasks.add(task);
    }

    public void go() throws InterruptedException
    {
        final ExecutorService threads = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(Runtime.getRuntime()
                .availableProcessors());
        try
        {
            final CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(tasks.size());
            for (final Runnable task : tasks)
                threads.execute(new Runnable() {
                    public void run()
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            task.run();
                        }
                        finally
                        {
                            latch.countDown();
                        }
                    }
                });
            latch.await();
        }
        finally
        {
            threads.shutdown();
        }
    }
}

// ...

public static void main(final String[] args) throws Exception
{
    ParallelTasks tasks = new ParallelTasks();
    final Runnable waitOneSecond = new Runnable() {
        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            }
            catch (InterruptedException e)
            {
            }
        }
    };
    tasks.add(waitOneSecond);
    tasks.add(waitOneSecond);
    tasks.add(waitOneSecond);
    tasks.add(waitOneSecond);
    final long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    tasks.go();
    System.err.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
}

Which prints a bit over 2000 on my dual-core box.

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I to was going to mention an executor class. Here is some example code that you would place in the executor class.

    private static ExecutorService threadLauncher = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);

    private List<Callable<Object>> callableList = new ArrayList<Callable<Object>>();

    public void addCallable(Callable<Object> callable) {
        this.callableList.add(callable);
    }

    public void clearCallables(){
        this.callableList.clear();
    }

    public void executeThreads(){
        try {
        threadLauncher.invokeAll(this.callableList);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public Object[] getResult() {

        List<Future<Object>> resultList = null;
        Object[] resultArray = null;
        try {

            resultList = threadLauncher.invokeAll(this.callableList);

            resultArray = new Object[resultList.size()];

            for (int i = 0; i < resultList.size(); i++) {
                resultArray[i] = resultList.get(i).get();
            }

        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return resultArray;
    }

Then to use it you would make calls to the executor class to populate and execute it.

executor.addCallable( some implementation of callable) // do this once for each task 
Object[] results = executor.getResult();
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It always annoyed me that there is no wrapper class for a set of jobs –  Alexander Torstling Jan 6 '10 at 20:50

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