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In MySQL, how do I get a list of all foreign key constraints pointing to a particular table? a particular column? This is the same thing as this Oracle question, but for MySQL.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 184 down vote accepted

For a table

select
  TABLE_NAME,COLUMN_NAME,CONSTRAINT_NAME, REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME,REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME
from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE
where
  REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME = '<table>';

for a column, the same but add an and for the REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME.

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2  
this always gives me an empty set, while query proposed by Node below works fine –  Acute May 17 '12 at 10:36
4  
@Acute: Are you sure you are asking about the correct table? If Node's query work, then you are likely asking about the other direction (i.e., keys FROM mytable, not keys TO mytable.) This expecting you wrote '<table>' with the table name and without the '<' and '>'? –  Vinko Vrsalovic May 17 '12 at 11:27
1  
Seems like I misunderstood you query, because I was querying for keys referencing FROM the <table> :) (yes, I wrote table name instead of "<table>" XD) –  Acute May 20 '12 at 1:12
    
Unless you are sure your table name is unique, you'll probably want to restrict your query to a particular database as well. Change the where clause to this: where REFERENCED_TABLE_SCHEMA = 'mydatabase' and REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME = 'mytable' –  user93341 Jul 2 at 3:10
    
This wont work in case of non root user even though the user have all permissions to the database –  Deepak Ram Oct 29 at 15:18

Here is a good way to find this information without going through information_schema:

SHOW CREATE TABLE `<yourtable>`;

I found this answer here: MySQL : show constraints on tables command

I needed this way because I wanted to see how the FK functioned, rather than just see if it existed or not.

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1  
simple yet effective! ty –  loostro Jan 12 at 18:51
11  
This shows all the constraints in <yourtable>, not all the constraints that point to <yourtable>. –  Barmar Apr 21 at 21:30
5  
As @Barmar says, this is entirely wrong; it will show the foreign keys belonging to the specified table, but will not show foreign keys pointing TO the table, which is what the question asks for. No idea how this got 50 upvotes; I guess people ended up here when really they were looking for the answer to the opposite question, found their answer here anyway, and didn't bother reading the original question (or even its title) before upvoting. –  Mark Amery Sep 4 at 15:25

If you use InnoDB and defined FK's you could query the information_schema database e.g.:

SELECT * FROM information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS 
WHERE information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' 
AND information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS.TABLE_SCHEMA = 'myschema'
AND information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS.TABLE_NAME = 'mytable';
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2  
actually, that points the wrong direction. that query shows all the foreign keys pointing FROM 'mytable', not all foreign keys pointing TO 'mytable'. –  Christian Oudard Oct 14 '08 at 15:29
    
This one works better in my case. I need to drop every foreign key constraint (and only those) from a table to be able to change the InnoDB engine MyISAM or NDB. –  Kohányi Róbert Jul 26 '12 at 4:11
    
You can get foreign keys in both directions from the REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS table – I have added another answer with the query. –  ChrisV Dec 12 '13 at 12:04
    
That is what I needed :D –  FosAvance Nov 5 at 22:06

Posting on an old answer to add some useful information.

I had a similar problem, but I also wanted to see the CONSTRAINT_TYPE along with the REFERENCED table and column names. So,

  1. To see all FKs in your table:

    USE '<yourschema>';
    
    SELECT i.TABLE_NAME, i.CONSTRAINT_TYPE, i.CONSTRAINT_NAME, k.REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME, k.REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME 
    FROM information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i 
    LEFT JOIN information_schema.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE k ON i.CONSTRAINT_NAME = k.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
    WHERE i.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' 
    AND i.TABLE_SCHEMA = DATABASE()
    AND i.TABLE_NAME = '<yourtable>';
    
  2. To see all the tables and FKs in your schema:

    USE '<yourschema>';
    
    SELECT i.TABLE_NAME, i.CONSTRAINT_TYPE, i.CONSTRAINT_NAME, k.REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME, k.REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME 
    FROM information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i 
    LEFT JOIN information_schema.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE k ON i.CONSTRAINT_NAME = k.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
    WHERE i.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' 
    AND i.TABLE_SCHEMA = DATABASE();
    
  3. To see all the FKs in your database:

    SELECT i.TABLE_SCHEMA, i.TABLE_NAME, i.CONSTRAINT_TYPE, i.CONSTRAINT_NAME, k.REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME, k.REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME 
    FROM information_schema.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i 
    LEFT JOIN information_schema.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE k ON i.CONSTRAINT_NAME = k.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
    WHERE i.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY';
    

Remember!

This is using the InnoDB storage engine. If you can't seem to get any foreign keys to show up after adding them it's probably because your tables are using MyISAM.

To check:

SELECT * TABLE_NAME, ENGINE FROM information_schema.TABLES WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = '<yourschema>';

To fix, use this:

ALTER TABLE `<yourtable>` ENGINE=InnoDB;
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6  
Those queries run much faster (from 2 secs to 0.0015 secs) if you specify k.TABLE_SCHEMA = DATABASE() and k.TABLE_NAME = '<table>' on the WHERE clause, as documented here dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/… –  guigouz Jan 21 '13 at 20:13

Most simplest way to see all foreign keys

SHOW CREATE TABLE table_name;

This will show the entire detail of the table named tbl_name.

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reposting a wrong answer...tsk, tsk... –  Steve Horvath Sep 30 at 1:37

As an alternative to Node’s answer, if you use InnoDB and defined FK’s you could query the information_schema database e.g.:

SELECT CONSTRAINT_NAME, TABLE_NAME, REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME
FROM information_schema.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS
WHERE CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = '<schema>'
AND TABLE_NAME = '<table>'

for foreign keys from <table>, or

SELECT CONSTRAINT_NAME, TABLE_NAME, REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME
FROM information_schema.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS
WHERE CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = '<schema>'
AND REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME = '<table>'

for foreign keys to <table>

You can also get the UPDATE_RULE and DELETE_RULE if you want them.

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I personally prefer this answer as using the REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS table gives you the update and cascade rule. +1 –  Luke Madhanga Oct 6 at 13:54

The solution I came up with is fragile; it relies on django's naming convention for foreign keys.

USE information_schema;
tee mysql_output
SELECT * FROM TABLE_CONSTRAINTS WHERE CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND TABLE_SCHEMA = 'database_name';
notee

Then, in the shell,

grep 'refs_tablename_id' mysql_output
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This solution will not only display all relations but also the constraint name, which is required in some cases (e.g. drop contraint):

select
    concat(table_name, '.', column_name) as 'foreign key',
    concat(referenced_table_name, '.', referenced_column_name) as 'references',
    constraint_name as 'constraint name'
from
    information_schema.key_column_usage
where
    referenced_table_name is not null;

If you want to check tables in a specific database, at the end of the query add the table name:

select
    concat(table_name, '.', column_name) as 'foreign key',
    concat(referenced_table_name, '.', referenced_column_name) as 'references',
    constraint_name as 'constraint name'
from
    information_schema.key_column_usage
where
    referenced_table_name is not null
    and table_schema = 'database_name';

Likewise, for a specific column name, add

and table_name = 'table_name

at the end of the query.

Inspired by this post here

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A quick way to list your FKs (Foreign Key references) using the

KEY_COLUMN_USAGE view:

SELECT CONCAT( table_name, '.',
column_name, ' -> ',
referenced_table_name, '.',
referenced_column_name ) AS list_of_fks
FROM information_schema.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE
WHERE REFERENCED_TABLE_SCHEMA = (your schema name here)
AND REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME is not null
ORDER BY TABLE_NAME, COLUMN_NAME;

This query does assume that the constraints and all referenced and referencing tables are in the same schema.

Add your own comment.

Source: the official mysql manual.

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To find all tables containing a particular foreign key such as employee_id

SELECT DISTINCT TABLE_NAME 
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE COLUMN_NAME IN ('employee_id')
AND TABLE_SCHEMA='table_name';
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