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we use logrotate and it runs daily ... now we have had some situations where logs have grown significantly (read: gigbaytes) and killing our server. So now we would like to set a maximum filesize to the logs ....

can I just add this to the logrotate.conf?

size 50M

and would it then apply to all log files? Or do I need to set this on a per log basis?

Or any other advice?

(ps. I understand that if you want to be notified is the log grows like described and what we want to do is not ideal - but it is better than not being able to logon anymore because there is no space available)

thanks, Sean

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It specifies the size of the log file to trigger rotation. For example “size 50M” will trigger a log rotation once the file is 50MB or greater in size. You can use the prefix M for megabytes, k for kilobytes and G for gigabytes. If no prefix is used it will take it to mean bytes. You can check the example at the end. There are three directives available 'size', 'maxsize' and 'minsize'. According to manpage:

minsize size
              Log  files  are  rotated when they grow bigger than size bytes,
              but not before the additionally specified time interval (daily,
              weekly,  monthly, or yearly).  The related size option is simi-
              lar except that it is mutually exclusive with the time interval
              options,  and  it causes log files to be rotated without regard
              for the last rotation time.  When minsize  is  used,  both  the
              size and timestamp of a log file are considered.

size size
              Log files are rotated only if they grow bigger then size bytes.
              If size is followed by k, the size is assumed to  be  in  kilo-
              bytes.  If the M is used, the size is in megabytes, and if G is
              used, the size is in gigabytes. So size 100,  size  100k,  size
              100M and size 100G are all valid.
maxsize size
              Log files are rotated when they grow bigger than size bytes even before
              the additionally specified time interval (daily, weekly, monthly, 
              or yearly).  The related size option is  similar  except  that  it 
              is mutually exclusive with the time interval options, and it causes
              log files to be rotated without regard for the last rotation time.  
              When maxsize is used, both the size and timestamp of a log file are                  
              considered.

Here is an example:

"/var/log/httpd/access.log" /var/log/httpd/error.log {
           rotate 5
           mail www@my.org
           size 100k
           sharedscripts
           postrotate
               /usr/bin/killall -HUP httpd
           endscript
       }

Here is an explanation for both files /var/log/httpd/access.log and /var/log/httpd/error.log. They are rotated whenever it grows over 100k in size, and the old logs files are mailed (uncompressed) to www@my.org after going through 5 rota- tions, rather than being removed. The sharedscripts means that the postrotate script will only be run once (after the old logs have been compressed), not once for each log which is rotated. Note that the double quotes around the first filename at the beginning of this sec- tion allows logrotate to rotate logs with spaces in the name. Normal shell quoting rules apply, with ’, ", and \ characters supported.

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As mentioned my Zeeshan, the logrotate options size, minsize, maxsize are triggers for rotation.

To better explain it. You can run logrotate as often as you like, but unless a threshold is reached such as the filesize being reached or the appropriate time passed, the logs will not be rotated.

The size option(s) does not ensure that your rotated logs are also of the specified size. To get them to be close to the specified size you need to call the logrotate program sufficiently often. This is critical.

For log files that build up very quickly (e.g. in the hundreds of MB a day), unless you want them to be very large you will need to ensure logrotate is called often! this is critical.

Therefore to stop your disk filling up with multi-gigabyte log files you need to ensure logrotate is called often enough, otherwise the log rotation will not work as well as you want.

on Ubuntu, you can easily switch to hourly rotation by moving the script /etc/cron.daily/logrotate to /etc/cron.hourly/logrotate

Or add

*/5 * * * * /etc/cron.daily/logrotate 

To your /etc/crontab file. To run it every 5 minutes.

The size option ignores the daily, weekly, monthly time options. But minsize & maxsize take it into account.

The man page is a little confusing there.

minsize rotates only when the file has reached an appropriate size and the set time period has passed. e.g. minsize 50MB + daily If file reaches 50MB before daily time ticked over, it'll keep growing until the next day.

maxsize will rotate when the log reaches a set size or the appropriate time has passed. e.g. maxsize 50MB + daily. If file is 50MB and we're not at the next day yet, the log will be rotated. If the file is only 20MB and we roll over to the next day then the file will be rotated.

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I've never used that as a global option, but one way to test it is to use the -d flag. This will not process any rotations, but it will tell you what logrotate would do.

So I tested this just now with the -d flag. My experiences seem to go against the man page. If I set a 'size 10' which would rotate if a log file was larger then 10 bytes, but also set the rotation to weekly, it will not rotate the file, even if it is larger than 10 bytes. If I comment out the 'weekly' parameter, then logrotate indicates it will rotate the file. That seems to be contrary to what I expected from the man page.

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Why? reading man page extract by @Zeeshan I would expect just that behaviour... ("minsize: ... Log files are rotated when they grow bigger than size bytes, but not before the additionally specified time interval ...") –  MarcoS Feb 14 '14 at 10:50

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