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This snippet of code is from the php.net manual on eval:

<?php

$string = 'cup';
$name = 'coffee';

$str = 'This is a $string with my $name in it.';
echo $str. "<br>";

eval("\$str = \"$str\";"); 
echo $str. "<br>";

?>

I somehow cannot comprehend what this line of code does: eval("\$str = \"$str\";").

I am guessing the net effect is something like:$str = "$str"; But when I use this in place of the eval code, I don't get the same effect. Can somebody walk me through this line of code. I am aware about the vulnerabilities that the function brings with it. But my point of interest is only limited to understanding that particular line of code.

I think I have my answer now -

eval("\$str = \"$str\";") and $str = "$str"; aren't the same thing. In the second case, $str is evaluated to This is a $string with my $name in it. and in the first case, the same string, since it is still inside the eval construct is further evaluated and results in This is a cup with my coffee in it.

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What output do you get when you run this? –  Amal Murali Nov 23 '13 at 12:40
4  
It abuses eval to make it interpret the $vars in the originally single quoted string, by using a double quoted one, replacing them with their values. I would suggest not using this, as there are all kinds of problems, like for instance "s in the source string. –  Wrikken Nov 23 '13 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

eval() will execute the string it gets as if it were PHP code.

$string = 'cup';
$name = 'coffee';

That's pretty much self-explanatory. Two values are stored in two variables, $string and $name.

$str = 'This is a $string with my $name in it.';
echo $str. "<br>";

This will output:

This is a $string with my $name in it.

Notice that the variable isn't expanded. Variables aren't interpolated when they're used inside single-quotes -- so the result is as expected. This is documented here.

eval("\$str = \"$str\";"); 
echo $str. "<br>";

This is probably what confuses you. Let's inspect it in detail. Inside the eval() statement, you have the following:

"\$str = \"$str\";"
  • \$str - the variable is escaped with \ to avoid it from being interpreted as a string. If you remove the backslash from the beginning, PHP will throw a Parse error.
  • \"$str\"; -- the actual value of the variable is used here, and the backslashes are used to escape the double-quotes.

When run, the PHP code to be executed would look like this:

$str = "This is a $string with my $name in it.";

In the end, you're just echoing the variable as normal, and it would just output:

This is a cup with my coffee in it.

The eval() function, like anything else could be very dangerous if incorrectly used. The manual warns you:

The eval() language construct is very dangerous because it allows execution of arbitrary PHP code. Its use thus is discouraged. If you have carefully verified that there is no other option than to use this construct, pay special attention not to pass any user provided data into it without properly validating it beforehand.

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Would you say that these 2 lines of code are identical: eval("\$str = \"$str\";"); vs $str="$str"; –  user1720897 Nov 23 '13 at 15:51
    
@user1720897: In this particular example, yes they are identical. However, that's not what eval is used for. This example might demonstrate the use better. –  Amal Murali Nov 23 '13 at 16:05
    
But running these 2 codes results in separate outputs - eval("\$str = \"$str\";"); outputs This is a cup with my coffee in it, whereas $str="$str"; outputs This is a $string with my $name in it. –  user1720897 Nov 23 '13 at 16:14
1  
@user1720897: It would be identical, if you had used double-quotes instead of single-quotes. See demo. –  Amal Murali Nov 23 '13 at 16:40

It evaluates the string as PHP. Notice how the first string doesn't print the $string & $name variable, as the string is surrounded by single quotes (and the variable's aren't escaped)

Running the same string through the eval function will evaluate the variables in that string.

The output being,

This is a $string with my $name in it.

This is a cup with my coffee in it.

This is all explained on the page you got the example from, http://php.net/manual/en/function.eval.php

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1  
you're missing half the explanation... and worse yet, you're simply repeating what's on the manual page which, judging by the question, the OP is most likely already reading. –  zamnuts Nov 23 '13 at 13:02
$str = 'This is a $string with my $name in it.';

Remember string interpolation? This will not show the values of variables in it, right? Because variables don't work in single quotes. Now If you say

eval("\$str = \"$str\";"); 

What this is doing is essentially evaluating this PHP expression

$str="$str";

And the backslashes you see there are just for escaping the required characters. It will be more clear if you make it like

eval(" \$myNewString = \"$str\"; " ); 
echo $myNewString;

Since This parameter to eval is a PHP expression and now with Double quotes, it will be evaluated and those variables will now give out their value to that string. Use the same expression with single quotes and again it wont work.

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You are saying that this is what its essentially doing: $str="$str";But when I run that code, the output is: This is a $string with my $name in it. –  user1720897 Nov 23 '13 at 15:47

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