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I would like to remove all changes to my working copy.
Running 'git status' shows files modified.
Nothing I do seems to remove these modifications.
E.g.:

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Enumerables/CachingEnumerable.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Pipelines/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuter.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/Rhino.Etl.Tests.csproj
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuterTest.cs
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git checkout -- Rhino.Etl.Core/Enumerables/CachingEnumerable.cs

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Enumerables/CachingEnumerable.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Pipelines/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuter.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/Rhino.Etl.Tests.csproj
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuterTest.cs
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git checkout `git ls-files -m`

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Enumerables/CachingEnumerable.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Pipelines/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuter.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/Rhino.Etl.Tests.csproj
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuterTest.cs
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git reset --hard HEAD
HEAD is now at 6c857e7 boo libraries updated to 2.0.9.2 and rhino.dsl.dll updated.

rbellamy@PROMETHEUS /d/Development/rhino-etl (master)
$ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Enumerables/CachingEnumerable.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Core/Pipelines/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuter.cs
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/Rhino.Etl.Tests.csproj
#       modified:   Rhino.Etl.Tests/SingleThreadedPipelineExecuterTest.cs
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")
share|improve this question
2  
Not sure why the git reset --hard didn't work here. Note: it should be git checkout -- `git ls-files -m` to cancel the files (--) –  VonC Jan 6 '10 at 21:41
    
If you delete the files and use checkout -- <file> it should work. The change detection is a bit picky in some situations (among others if CRLF mismatch is present) –  eckes May 23 '13 at 18:57

7 Answers 7

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Try this:

git config --global core.autocrlf false

I've had these kinds of problems too. It comes down to git automatically converting crlf to lf. Why it keeps telling me the files are changed is not really clear to me either.

Edit:

The git manpages say this:

http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/v1.7.3/git-config.html

CRLF conversion bears a slight chance of corrupting data. autocrlf=true will convert CRLF to LF during commit and LF to CRLF during checkout. A file that contains a mixture of LF and CRLF before the commit cannot be recreated by git. For text files this is the right thing to do: it corrects line endings such that we have only LF line endings in the repository. But for binary files that are accidentally classified as text the conversion can corrupt data.

share|improve this answer
3  
Okay... so that did it... now git status shows no changes. I've read up on the autocrlf settings, and I just can't seem to get it right. –  rbellamy Jan 6 '10 at 21:45
    
Added more information –  Ikke Jan 6 '10 at 21:52
1  
Good catch! +1. Yet another argument for me setting that to false (stackoverflow.com/questions/1249932/…). –  VonC Jan 6 '10 at 22:46
    
What does this mean: "A file that contains a mixture of LF and CRLF before the commit cannot be recreated by git." Is this because git will always normalize line endings, based on the core.autocrlf setting? –  rbellamy Jan 8 '10 at 15:50
    
@rbellamy Indeed. If core.autocrlf is set to auto, when pulling it converts all line endings to crlf, and when pushing, to lf. –  Ikke Jan 10 '10 at 11:12

Having consistent line endings is a good thing. For example it will not trigger unnecessary merges, albeit trivial. I have seen Visual Studio create files with mixed line endings.

Also some programs like bash (on linux) do require that .sh files are LF terminated.

To make sure this happens you can use gitattributes. It works on repository level no matter what the value of autcrlf is.

For example you can have .gitattributes like this: * text=auto

You can also be more specific per file type/extension if it did matter in your case.

Then autocrlf can convert line endings for Windows programs locally.

On a mixed C#/C++/Java/Ruby/R, Windows/Linux project this is working well. No issues so far.

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For future people having this problem: Having filemode changes can also have the same symptoms. git config core.filemode false will fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I've been having a frustrating time trying to work out why I kept getting modified files in a mixed Linux/Windows environment when the line endings hadn't changed. This finally gave me a clean git status. –  Emma Burrows Feb 7 '13 at 16:15
    
After doing this, you may need to do a git checkout . –  Martin Neal Jun 19 '13 at 22:24
    
Worked for me without having to checkout again –  phillee Sep 17 '13 at 0:41

This has been driving me crazy, especially that I couldn`t fix this without any of the solutions found online. Here is how I solved it. Can't take the credits here since this is the work of a colleague :)

Setup: Xubuntu 12.04 Git repo with glfw project

Problem: Unable to reset glfw files. They always show as modified, regardless of what I tried.

Solved:

edit .gitattributes

Comment out the line:    # text=auto

Save the file

restore .gitattributes:   git checkout .gitattributes
share|improve this answer
    
It might be helpful to mention the contents of the commented line. –  rbellamy Aug 31 '13 at 21:08
    
Unfortunately, most projects don't have this optional .gitattribute file –  mchiasson Jul 29 at 18:03

I was only able to fix this by temporary deleting my repo's .gitattributes file (which defined * text=auto and *.c text).

I ran git status after deleting and the modifications were gone. They didn't return even after .gitattributes was put back in place.

share|improve this answer
    
We discovered the same thing on our side. –  mchiasson Jul 29 at 18:04

I was having this problem on Windows but wasn't prepared to look into the ramifications of using config --global core.autocrlf false I also wasn't prepared to abandon other private branches and goodies in my stash and start with a fresh clone. I just need to get something done. Now.

This worked for me, on the idea that you let git rewrite your working directory completely:

git rm --cached -r .
git reset --hard

(Note that running just git reset --hard wasn't good enough nor was a plain rm on the files before the reset as are suggested in the comments to the original question)

share|improve this answer
    
This worked well for me, thanks! –  sparrowt Sep 20 '13 at 14:29
    
Worked for me too! Thanks! –  jdg Mar 23 at 16:24
    
Another success here after changing core.autocrlf didn't have any effect. –  Daniel Buckmaster Aug 9 at 1:36

I had a .bat file with the same problem (couldn't get rid it it in untracked files). git checkout -- didn't work, neither did any of the suggestions on this page. The only thing that worked for me was to do:

git stash save --keep-index

And then to delete the stash:

git stash drop
share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic -- this worked! I couldn't get git to stop thinking a .png file had been changed and nothing else worked. –  Kevin Lo Mar 19 at 23:24

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